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Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 18 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 16 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, Three orations on the Agrarian law, the four against Catiline, the orations for Rabirius, Murena, Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 16 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 10 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 8 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 8 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 6 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, Three orations on the Agrarian law, the four against Catiline, the orations for Rabirius, Murena, Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson). You can also browse the collection for Campania (Italy) or search for Campania (Italy) in all documents.

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C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Julius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 20 (search)
nstrument as witnesses, did not add " in the consulship of Caesar and Bibulus," but, "of Julius and Caesar;" putting the same person down twice, under his name and surname. The following verses likewise were currently repeated on this occasion: Non Bibulo quidquam nuper, sed Caesare factum est; Nam Bibulo fieri consule nil memini. Nothing was done in Bibulus's year: No; Caesar only then was consul here. The land of Stellas, consecrated by our ancestors to the gods, with some other lands in Campania left subject to tribute, for the support of the expenses of the government, he divided, but not by lot, among upwards of twenty thousand freemen, who had each of them three or more children. He eased the publicans, upon their petition, of a third part of the sum which they had engaged to pay into the public treasury; and openly admonished them not to bid so extravagantly upon the next occasion. He made various profuse grants to meet the wishes of others, no one opposing him; or if any such
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Augustus (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 4 (search)
was the daughter of Marcus Atius Balbus, and Julia, sister to Caius Julius Caesar. Balbus was, by the father's side, of a family who were natives of Aricia,Now Laricia, or Riccia, a town of the Campagna di Roma. on the Appian Way, about ten miles from Rome. and many of whom had been in the senate. By the mother's side he was nearly related to Pompey the Great; and after he had borne the office of praetor, was one of the twenty commissioners appointed by the Julian law to divide the land in Campania among the people. But Mark Antony, treating with contempt Augustus's descent even by the mother's side, says that his great grand-father was of African descent, and at one time kept a perfumer's shop, and at another, a bake-house, in Aricia. And Cassius of Parma, in a letter, taxes Augustus with being the son not only of a baker, but a usurer. These are his words: "Thou art a lump of thy mother's meal, which a money-changer of Nerulum taking from the newest bake-house of Aricia, kneaded int
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Augustus (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 70 (search)
museum; what treasures of science do you not discover to us !--Epist. i. 9. or he went to some villa belonging to his freedmen near the city. But when he was indisposed, he commonly took up his residence in the house of Maecenas. Maecenas had a house and gardens on the Esquiline Hill, celebrated for their salubrity: Nunc licet Esquiliis habitore salubribus. Hor. Sat. i. 8, 14. Of all the places of retirement from the city, he chiefly frequented those upon the seacoast, and the islands of Campania,Such as Baiae, and the islands of Ischia, Procida, Capri, and others; the resorts of the opulent nobles, where they had magnificent marine villas. or the towns nearest the city, such as Lanuvium, Praeneste, and Tibur,Now Tivoli, a delicious spot, where Horace had a villa, in which he hoped to spend his declining years. Ver ubi longum, tepidasque praebet Jupiter brumas: … … ibi, tu calentem Debit sparges lachryma favillam Vatis amici. Odes, B. ii. 5. Adrian also had a magnificent villa near
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Augustus (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 96 (search)
His malady proceeded from diarrhoea; notwithstanding which, he went round the coast of Campania, and the adjacent islands, and spent four days in that of Capri; where he gave himself up entirely to repose and relaxation. Happening to sail by the bay of Puteoli, the passengers and mariners aboard a ship of Alexandria, "Puteoli"-" a ship of Alexandria." Words which bring to our recollection a passage in the voyage of St. Paul, Acts xxvili. 11-13. Alexandria was at that time the seat of an extensive commerce. and not only exported to Rome and other cities of Italy, vast quantities of corn and other products of Egypt, but was the mart for spices and other commodities, the fruits of the traffic with the east. just then arrived, clad all in white, with chaplets upon their heads, and offering incense, loaded him with praises and joyful acclamations, crying out, " By you we live, by you we sail securely, by you enjoy our liberty and our fortunes." At which being greatly pleased, he distribu
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Tiberius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 11 (search)
From Ostia, journeying along the coast of Campania, he halted awhile on receiving intelligence of Augustus's being taken ill, but this giving rise to a rumour that he stayed with a view to something extraordinary, he sailed with the wind almost full against him, and arrived at Rhodes, having been struck with the pleasantness and healthiness of the island at the time of his landing there in his return from Armenia. Here contenting himself with a small house, and a villa not much larger, near the town, he led entirely a private life, taking his walks sometimes about the Gymnasia, The Gymnasia were places of exercise, and received their name from the Greek word signifying naked, because the contending parties wore nothing but drawers. without any lictor or other attendant, and returning the civilities of the Greeks with almost as much complaisance as if he had been upon a level with them. One morning, in settling the course of his daily excursion, he happened to say, that he should vis
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Tiberius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 39 (search)
But after the loss of his two sons, of whom Germanicus died in Syria, and Drusus at Rome, he withdrew into Campania;A.U.C. 779 at which time opinion and conversation were almost general, that he never would return, and would die soon. And both nearly turned out to be true. For indeed he never more came to Rome; and a few days after leaving it, when he was at a villa of his called the Cave, near Terracina,Terracina, standing at the southern extremity of the Pontine Marshes, on the shore of the Mediterranean. It is surrounded by high calcareous cliffs, in which there are caverns, affording, as Strabo informs us, cool retreats, attached to the Roman villas built round. during supper a great many huge stones fell from above, which killed several of the guests and attendants; but he almost hopelessly escaped.
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Tiberius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 40 (search)
After he had gone round Campania, and dedicated the capitol at Capua, and a temple to Augustus at Nola,Augustus died at Nola, a city in Campania. See c. lviii. of his life. which he made the pretext of his journey, he retired to Capri; being greatly delighted with the island, because it was accessible only by a narrow beach, being on all sides surrounded with rugged cliffs, of a stupendous height, and by a deep sea. But immediately, the people of Rome being extremely clamorous for his return,Campania. See c. lviii. of his life. which he made the pretext of his journey, he retired to Capri; being greatly delighted with the island, because it was accessible only by a narrow beach, being on all sides surrounded with rugged cliffs, of a stupendous height, and by a deep sea. But immediately, the people of Rome being extremely clamorous for his return, on account of a disaster at Fidenae, Fidenae stood in a bend of the Tiber, near its junction with the Anio. There are few traces of it remaining. Where upwards of twenty thousand persons had been killed by the fall of the amphitheatre, during a public spectacle of gladiators, he crossed over again to the continent, and gave all people free access to him; so much the more, because, at his departure from the city, he had caused it to be proclaimed that no one should address him, and had declined
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Tiberius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 72 (search)
, to keep off all who should offer to come to meet him. The second time he travelled on the Appian way, So called from Appius Claudius, the Censor, one of Tiberius's ancestors, who constructed it. It took a direction southward from Rome, through Campania to 'Brundusium, starting from what is the present Porta di San Sebastiano, from which the road to Naples takes its departure. as far as the seventh mile-stone from the city, but he immediately returned, without entering it, having only taken a n the habit of diverting himself with a snake, and upon going to feed it with his own hand, according to custom, he found it devoured by ants: from which he was advised to beware of the fury of the mob. On this account, returning in all haste to Campania, he fell ill at Astura ; A small town on the coast of Latium, and the present Nettuno. It was here that Cicero was slain by the satellites of Antony. but recovering a little, went on to Circeii. A town on a promontory of the same dreary coast,
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Tiberius (ed. Alexander Thomson), Remarks on Tiberius (search)
addressed to Lollius, he mentions him as great and accomplished in the superlative degree; maxime Lolli, liberrime Lolli; so imposing had been the manners and address of this deceitfnl courtier. Lucius, the second son of Julia, was banished into Campania, for using, as it is said, seditious language against his grandfather. In the seventh year of his exile, Augustus proposed to recall him; but Livia and Tiberius, dreading the consequences of his being restored to the emperor's favour, put in praberius from the capital. With this view, under the pretence of relieving his master from the cares of government, he persuaded him to retire to a distance from Rome. The emperor, indolent and luxurious, approved of the proposal, and retired into Campania, leaving to his ambitious minister the whole direction of the empire. Had Sejanus now been governed by common prudence and moderation, he might have attained to the accomplishment of all his wishes; but a natural impetuosity of temper, and the i
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Caligula (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 14 (search)
ouse, Tiberius's will was set aside, it having left his other grandson,His name was also Tiberius. See before, TIBERIUS, C. lxxvi. then a minor, co-heir with him, the whole government and administration of affairs was placed in his hands; so much to the joy and satisfaction of the public, that, in less than three months after, above a hundred and sixty thousand victims are said to have been offered in sacrifice. Upon his going, a few days afterwards, to the nearest islands on the coast of Campania,Procida, Ischia, Capri, etc. vows were made for his safe return; every person emulously testifying their care and concern for his safety. And when he fell ill, the people hung about the Palatium all night long; some vowed, in public handbills, to risk their lives in the combats of the amphitheatre, and others to lay them down, for his recovery. To this extraordinary love entertained for him by his countrymen, was added an uncommon regard by foreign nations. Even Artabanus, king of the Parth
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