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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,604 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 760 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 530 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 404 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 382 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 346 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 330 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 312 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 312 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 310 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 20, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) or search for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 7 document sections:

Swearing in East Tennessee. --Judge Humphreys, of the Confederate District for East Tennessee, has been holding court at Knoxville. The Register notices the proceedings of a late day: By far the larger portion of the Knoxville bar came foEast Tennessee, has been holding court at Knoxville. The Register notices the proceedings of a late day: By far the larger portion of the Knoxville bar came forward and took the oath to support the Constitution and Government of the Confederate States of America, as well as the usual oath of faithfulness administered in our courts to all practicing attorneys. Among the gentlemen thus sworn was Mr. John Baxter, who has been considered by the late Union party of East Tennessee as a prominent leader among them, and who has been regarded by Southern men as one of the most violent and ultra of the opponents of Southern Rights in the State. During theReed, solemnly and sincerely swear that I will truly and faithfully demean myself as a good and true citizen of the State of Tennessee and of the Confederate States of America, and that I will be subject to the powers and authorities that are now est
Tennessee prisoners. --Capt. H. M. Ashby, with an escort, arrived in Nashville a few days ago, from knoxville, having in charge four prisoners who have been sent on for trial before the Confederate States District Court, at the October term, on a charge of treason. The names of the prisoners are John Gray, John W. Smith, Joel W. Jarvis and J. W. Thornburg. They were leaders in the rebellious movements in East Tennessee, and took an active part in leading citizens of that end of the StatEast Tennessee, and took an active part in leading citizens of that end of the State estray by the most despicable misrepresentations. They had a preliminary hearing before the Hon. West H. Humphreys, at Knoxville, and their guilt was so clear that he sent them before the Confederate States District Court for further trial, but the Sheriff of Knox county having refused to take an oath to support the Constitution of the Confederate States, Judge Humphreys felt unwilling to commit them to his custody, as jailor of Knox county, and ordered that they be confined in the jail of Da
More prisoners. --The Central train brought down yesterday fifteen prisoners from Manassas, sixty-seven from Gen. Lee's command, and one man arrested as a spy, and sent hither from Huntersville. Quite a crowd gathered around Gen. Lee's prisoners, these being the first sent down by him, and some persons entered into conversation with them. One of our German citizens amused the by-standers very much by his comic remarks, and enjoyed his own jokes as much as anybody else did. These prisoners are from the Northwestern States--chiefly from Ohio — and were taken in a skirmish between two Tennessee regiments, under Col. Savage, and a smaller Federal force, near Kircher's (or Crrutcher's) Orchard — a point somewhere between Big Spring and Huttonsville. They were marched to the military prison, followed by a number of curious spectator
Death of Hon. R. G. Payne. --The Hon. Robert Garnett Payne, of Tennessee, died at his residence in Memphis, on Monday night last.
Manufacture on gunpowder. --The manufacture of gunpowder is said to be progressing rapidly in the South. The establishment of a Government powder factory is only needed to give us abundant supplies of this important article. The material is plentiful. The most valuable ingredient of powder, saltpetre, is found abundantly in the limestone caves in Tennessee, Georgia and North Alabama.
"Tennessee Exiles." --Some sharpers are making a good thing in Cincinnati and other Western cities, playing the role of Tennessee exiles. The costume is an antiquated wagon, a venerable horse, with great development of kip and rib, and an ordinary stock of sunburnt children clad in dilapidated costume. The caravan parades the streets, and a crowd of curious spectators is soon assembled; when the doleful tale of exile is told. Driven from home with barely enough time to get aboard of thTennessee exiles. The costume is an antiquated wagon, a venerable horse, with great development of kip and rib, and an ordinary stock of sunburnt children clad in dilapidated costume. The caravan parades the streets, and a crowd of curious spectators is soon assembled; when the doleful tale of exile is told. Driven from home with barely enough time to get aboard of their carts, they have traveled, so the story goes, through "thick and thin," and reached their destination penniless of course. Then the contributions are solicited — the hat goes around — and $40 or $50 is subscribed at onc
The Telegraph in Tennessee. New Orleans, Sept. 19. --The failure on yesterday to receive our usual supply of news induces the belief that the Lincoln Government has taken possession of the telegraph lines. Later.--It is now known that the Tennessee troops have possession of the line.