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Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 168 0 Browse Search
Hesiod, Theogony 48 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 38 0 Browse Search
Homer, Iliad 36 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 26 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 22 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 18 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 16 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 16 0 Browse Search
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 14 0 Browse Search
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Aeschylus, Suppliant Women (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.), line 154 (search)
Chorus Yet, if she will not, we, a dark,sun-burned race, with suppliant boughs will invoke the underworld Zeus, Zeus the great hostof the dead; for if the gods of Olympus hear us not, we will hang ourselves.
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
. In these lines Hephaestus plainly recognizes Hera as his mother, but it is not equally clear that he recognizes Zeus as his father; the epithet “father” which he applies to him may refer to the god's general paternity in relation to gods and men. Him Zeus cast out of heaven, because he came to the rescue of Hera in her bonds.See Hom. Il. 1.590ff. For when Hercules had taken Troy and was at sea, Hera sent a storm after him; so Zeus hung her from Olympus.See Hom. Il. 15.18ff., where Zeus is said to have tied two anvils to the feet of Hera when he hung her out of heaven. Compare Apollod. 2.7.1; Nonnus, in Westermann's Mythographi Graeci (Brunswick, 1843), Appendix Narrationum, xxix, 1, pp. 371ff. Hephaestus fell on Lemnos and was lamed of his legs,The significance of lameness in myth and ritual is obscure. The Yorubas of West Africa say that Shankpanna, the god of smallpox, is lame and limps along
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
d on the throne of Apollo at Amyclae (Paus. 3.18.15), and it was the subject of a group of statuary dedicated by the Cnidians at Delphi (Paus. 10.11.1). His sufferings in hell were painted by Polygnotus in his famous picture of the underworld at Delphi. The great artist represented the sinner worn to a shadow, but no longer racked by the vultures gnawing at his liver (Paus. 10.29.3). Apollo also slew Marsyas, the son of Olympus. For Marsyas, having found the pipes which Athena had thrown away because they disfigured her face,As she played on the pipes, she is said to have seen her puffed and swollen cheeks reflected in water. See Plut. De cohibenda ira 6; Athenaeus xiv.7, p. 616ef; Prop. iii.22(29). 16ff.; Ovid, Fasti vi.697ff.; Ovid, Ars Am. iii.505ff.; Hyginus, Fab. 165; Fulgentius, Mytholog. iii.9; Scriptores rerum mythicarum Latini, ed. G
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
Fab. 28. These grew every year a cubit in breadth and a fathom in height; and when they were nine years old,This answers to the e)nne/wroi of Homer (Hom. Od. 11.31), the meaning of which has been disputed. See Merry, on Hom. Od. x.19. Hyginus, Fab. 28 understood e)nne/wroi in the same way as Apollodorus (“cum essent annorum novem”). being nine cubits broad and nine fathoms high, they resolved to fight against the gods, and they set Ossa on Olympus, and having set Pelion on Ossa they threatened by means of these mountains to ascend up to heaven, and they said that by filling up the sea with the mountains they would make it dry land, and the land they would make sea. And Ephialtes wooed Hera, and Otus wooed Artemis; moreover they put Ares in bonds.They are said to have imprisoned him for thirteen months in a brazen pot, from which he was rescued, in a state of great exhaustion, by the interposition
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
is, Attis, Osiris ii.97ff. The games at Abdera are alluded to by the poet Machon, quoted by Athenaeus viii.41, p. 349 B. and bringing the mares he gave them to Eurystheus. But Eurystheus let them go, and they came to Mount Olympus, as it is called, and there they were destroyed by the wild beasts. The ninth labour he enjoined on Hercules was to bring the belt of Hippolyte.As to the expedition of Herakles to fetch the belt of the Amazon, see Eur. ded giant Briareus. We have already heard of Apollo serving a man in the capacity of neatherd as a punishment for murder perpetrated by the deity (see above, Apollod. 1.9.15, with the note). These back-stair chronicles of Olympus shed a curious light on the early Greek conception of divinity. Therefore Apollo sent a pestilence, and Poseidon a sea monster, which, carried up by a flood, snatched away the people of the plain. But as oracles foretold de
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
When Hercules was sailing from Troy, Hera sent grievous storms,See Hom. Il. 14.249ff., Hom. Il. 15.24ff. which so vexed Zeus that he hung her from Olympus.See Apollod. 1.3.5. Hercules sailed to Cos,With the following account of Herakles's adventures in Cos, compare the Scholiasts on Hom. Il. i.590, xiv.255; Tzetzes, Chiliades ii.445; Ov. Met. 7.363ff. The Scholiast on Hom. Il. xiv.255 tells us that the story was found in Pherecydes, he had Antiades; by Chryseis he had Onesippus; by Oriahe had Laomenes; by Lysidice he had Teles; by Menippis he had Entelides; by Anthippe he had Hippodromus; by Eury he had Teleutagoras; by Hippo he had Capylus; by Euboea he had Olympus; by Nice he had Nicodromus; by Argele he had Cleolaus; by Exole he had Erythras; by Xanthis he had Homolippus; by Stratonice he had Atromus; by Iphis he had Celeustanor; by Laothoe he had Antiphus; by Antiope he had Alopius; by Cal
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
ed by Athena. And being exceedingly grieved for her, Athena made a wooden image in her likeness, and wrapped the aegis, which she had feared, about the breast of it, and set it up beside Zeus and honored it. But afterwards Electra, at the time of her violation,See above, Apollod. 3.12.1. took refuge at the image, and Zeus threw the Palladium along with AteHomer tells (Hom. Il. 19.126-131) how Zeus in anger swore that Ate should never again come to Olympus, and how he seized her by the head and flung her from heaven. into the Ilian country; and Ilus built a temple for it, and honored it. Such is the legend of the Palladium. And Ilus married Eurydice, daughter of Adrastus, and begat Laomedon,Compare Hom. Il. 20.236. Homer does not mention the mother of Laomedon. According to one Scholiast on the passage she was Eurydice, daughter of Adrastus, as Apollodorus has it; according to another she was Batia,
Aristophanes, Birds (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.), line 550 (search)
how will mankind recognize us as gods and not as jays? Us, who have wings and fly? Pisthetaerus You talk rubbish! Hermes is a god and has wings and flies, and so do many other gods. First of all, Victory flies with golden wings, Eros is undoubtedly winged too, and Iris is compared by Homer to a timorous dove. Euelpides But will not Zeus thunder and send his winged bolts against us? Pisthetaerus If men in their blindness do not recognize us as gods and so continue to worship the dwellers in Olympus? Then a cloud of sparrows greedy for corn must descend upon their fields and eat up all their seeds; we shall see then if Demeter will mete them out any wheat. Euelpides By Zeus, she'll take good care she does not, and you will see her inventing a thousand excuses. Pisthetaerus The crows too will prove your divinity to them by pecking out the eyes of their flocks and of their draught-oxen; and then let Apollo cure them, since he is a physician and is paid for the purpose. Euelpides Oh! don
Aristophanes, Birds (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.), line 592 (search)
! you will make a most profitable venture.” Euelpides I shall buy a trading-vessel and go to sea. I will not stay with you. Pisthetaerus You will discover treasures to them, which were buried in former times, for you know them. Do not all men say, “None knows where my treasure lies, unless perchance it be some bird.” Euelpides I shall sell my boat and buy a spade to unearth the vessels. Leader of the Chorus And how are we to give them health, which belongs to the gods? Pisthetaerus If they are happy, is not that the chief thing towards health? The miserable man is never well. Leader of the Chorus Old Age also dwells in Olympus. How will they get at it? Must they die in early youth? Pisthetaerus Why, the birds, by Zeus, will add three hundred years to their life. Leader of the Chorus From whom will they take them? Pisthetaerus From whom? Why, from themselves. Don't you know the cawing crow lives five times as long as a man? Euelpides Ah! ah! these are far better kings for us than
Aristophanes, Birds (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.), line 685 (search)
less egg in the bosom of the infinite deeps of Erebus, and from this, after the revolution of long ages, sprang the graceful Eros with his glittering golden wings, swift as the whirlwinds of the tempest. He mated in deep Tartarus with dark Chaos, winged like himself, and thus hatched forth our race, which was the first to see the light.That of the Immortals did not exist until Eros had brought together all the ingredients of the world, and from their marriage Heaven, Ocean, Earth and the imperishable race of blessed gods sprang into being. Thus our origin is very much older than that of the dwellers in Olympus. We are the offspring of Eros; there are a thousand proofs to show it. We have wings and we lend assistance to lovers. How many handsome youths, who had sworn to remain insensible, have opened their thighs because of our power and have yielded themselves to their lovers when almost at the end of their youth, being led away by the gift of a quail, a waterfowl, a goose, or a cock.
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