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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 10 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 9 1 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 8 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 1 1 Browse Search
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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Epitaph of the valiant Esquire M. Peter Read in the south Ile of Saint Peters Church in the citie of Norwich , which was knighted by Charles the fift at the winning of Tunis in the yeere of our Lord 1538. (search)
The Epitaph of the valiant Esquire M. Peter Read in the south Ile of Saint Peters Church in the citie of Norwich , which was knighted by Charles the fift at the winning of Tunis in the yeere of our Lord 1538. HERE under lyeth the corpes of Peter Reade Esquire, who hath worthily served, not onely his Prince and Countrey, but also the Emperour Charles the fift, both at his conquest of Barbarie, and at his siege at Tunis , as also in other places. Who had given him by the sayd Emperour for his valiant deedes the order of Barbary. Who dyed the 29 day of December, in the yeere of our Lord God 1566.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A briefe Remembrance of things to be indevoured at Constantinople, and in other places in Turkie, touching our Clothing and our Dying, and things that bee incident to the same, and touching ample vent of our natural commodities, & of the labour of our poore people withall, and of the generall enriching of this Realme: drawen by M. Richard Hakluyt of the middle Temple, and given to a friend that was sent into Turkie 1582. (search)
This citie is situate upon Nilus the river, and thence this is brought to Venice and to divers other Cities of Italie, and to Antwerpe. 9 To note all kindes of clothing in Turkie, and all degrees of their labour in the same. 10 To endevour rather the vent of Kersies, then of other Clothes as a thing more beneficiall to our people. 11 To endevour the sale of such our clothes as bee coloured with own owne naturall colours as much as you can, rather then such as be coloured with forren colours. 12 To seeke out a vent for our Bonettos, a cap made for Barbarie, for that the poore people may reape great profite by the trade. 13 To endevour vent of knit Stocks made of Norwich yarne, & of other yarne, which brought to great trade, may turne our poore people to great benefite, besides the vent of the substance, of our colours, and of our divers labour. 14 To endevor a vent of our Saffron for the benefit of our poore people: for a large vent found, it setteth many on worke.
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.25 (search)
wards the sea, where the quieter people love to brood and dream away their summer. Finally, I came to the Queen's, ordered my lunch, and afterwards took train to Norwich. As I was not yet too tired for sight-seeing, I drove to the Cathedral. It is like a long Parish-church within. The gateways are grim-looking objects, similar got up as for a Chicago Exhibition. The mound on which it stands, and the deep, dry ditch around, are sufficiently ancient. As I walked around the Castle, old Norwich looked enchanting. I cannot tell whether the town is worth looking at, but I have seldom seen one which appeared to promise so much. The worst of these old town hotels are always so depressing. If the Grand Hotel of Cromer was at Yarmouth, it would totally change the character of the town, and so would a similar one for Norwich. On the Continent, they have just as interesting old towns to show the visitor, but they have also good hotels. Yarmouth beach is equal to that of Cromer, but t
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
ey reads, in the wilds of Africa, 252-255; the scavenger-beetles of, 288; thoughts on reading the, 527. Ngalyema and the fetish, 339-342. Nile, the, Stanley's discoveries regarding the sources of, 301, 371, 405. North-Welsh, the, 52. Norwich, 452. Odessa, Stanley at, 247. O'Kelly, James J., 468, 469, 471, 472. Owen, Hicks, 18. Owen, Mary, aunt of Stanley, 42-57, 207, 208. Owen, Moses, 41-51. Parke, Surgeon, joins the expedition for the rescue of Emin, 354; on the march, ent, 439; defeated, 439; his speeches on second candidacy, 440-442; his disgust at electioneering methods, 443, 444; on Beauregard, Lee, and Grant, 445; on Mackinnon and the East African Company, 446-449; on East Anglia and Yarmouth, 450-452; on Norwich, 452; his enjoyment of solitude by the sea, 453; on the Matabele War, 454, 455; on a coal-strike, 455; on W. T. Stead, 455, 456; on the destruction of the slave-trade in Africa, 457, 458; on Lowell's Letters, 458, 459, 461; on A. L. Bruce, 459,
ustian; other varieties of fustian are known by the names of corduroy, velverett, velveteen, thicksett, double-jean, velvet-tuft, moleskin (cropped before dyeing), beaverteen (cropped after dyeing), cantoon. These goods were first made in Norwich, England, in 1554, and were called Norwich satins. Fut′chel. (Carriage.) The jaws between which the hinder end of a tongue is inserted; the similar parts in a wagon are called tongue-hounds. Fut′tock. (Shipwrighting.) One of the timbeNorwich satins. Fut′chel. (Carriage.) The jaws between which the hinder end of a tongue is inserted; the similar parts in a wagon are called tongue-hounds. Fut′tock. (Shipwrighting.) One of the timbers in the compound rib of a vessel. A timber of the dimensions and form for the rib of a vessel cannot be procured in one piece; the rib is built up of pieces scarfed together. The number is according to the length of the sections of the requisite hight. They are known as the first, second, and third futtock, terminated by the top-timber. See frame. Fut′tock-hoop. (Nautical.) A hoop encircling the mast at a point below the head, and serving for the attachment of the sha
other regularly published journals. During the period of the Commonwealth and the Restoration their number multiplied, but none appear to have been published oftener than once a week until about the reign of Queen Anne, when the demand for news from the Duke of Marlborough's army led to their being issued tri-weekly. The first London daily was the Courant, published by Samuel Buckley in 1703. The first established newspaper in England, outside of London, is believed to have been the Norwich postman, 1706. The first actually published in Scotland was at Edinburgh in 1654. The Dublin News-letter, the earliest Irish paper, was established in 1685. In the United States a newspaper was attempted as early as 1690. The first number was dated September 25 of that year, but its farther issue was prevented by the colonial government, it being published contrary to law, and containing reflections of a very high nature. In 1704 the Boston News-letter, published by authority, wa
dia shawls are sometimes made of pure Thibetian goats' wool, frequently of goats' wool and sheep's wool, and often wholly of the latter. The manufacture of imitation Cashmere shawls was introduced into England about 1784 by a manufacturer of Norwich. He employed a warp of Piedmontese silk and a weft of worsted yarn, the design being afterward worked in by a process of hand darning. Norwich shawls were first produced entirely in the loom in 1805. Paisley then took up the manufacture and sNorwich shawls were first produced entirely in the loom in 1805. Paisley then took up the manufacture and succeeded in producing successful imitation of Cashmere, using wool only, at very low prices. In 1802 the manufacture was begun at Paris. The invention of Jacquard's loom, or at least its perfection by Jacquard, is said to have originated in this manufacture. The French imitations of India or Cashmere shawls still approach nearer the original than any others, and command a corresponding price. Those of Scotch manufacturers are, however, but little behind them, and are constantly improving.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
s a very great man. When I asked who at the bar now was most like him, he said: Nobody: there is a degenerate race now; there are no good speakers at the bar, except Sir William Follett and Mr. Pemberton. He spoke of Lord Langdale as a person who had never done any thing, and who never would do any thing, and who was an ordinary man. He said that Mr. and Mrs. Austin, John Austin, 1797-1860; author of The Province of Jurisprudence Determined; and Mrs. Sarah Austin of the Taylor family of Norwich, the translator of Ranke's History of the Popes, and other German works. Mrs. Austin died in 1867. Their daughter, Lady Duff Gordon, well-known in literature, died in Egypt, in 1869.—who had just returned from Malta, where Mr. Austin went to reform the law,—would probably cease to be reformers, having experienced the practical difficulties of reform, and would retire disheartened from the cause. In making this remark, he obviously intended to allude to a supposed want of perseverance and
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 8: (search)
and among them were certainly some interesting men: such as Sir William Gell, to whom I had letters, and who is a man of learning and taste, but a consummate fop in person and in letters; Lord Guilford (Frederick North), a man of more learning, and whose active benevolence will do more for Greece than Gell's pretensions and showy books; Randohr, the Prussian Minister; the Marquis de Sommariva, a Milanese and a kind of Maecenas of the arts now; and Mr. Benjamin Smith, son of the member from Norwich, who is here with his sister for his health. I always had a plate at their table, and generally met somebody that interested or instructed me: such as Sir William Cumming, a Scotchman of talent; the famous Azzelini, who was with Bonaparte in Egypt, and gave me once a curious account of the shooting the prisoners and poisoning the sick at Jaffa; Miss Lydia White, the fashionable blue-stocking; and many others of the same sort, so that the two or three days in the week I dined there were ve
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 9: (search)
ife. Some laughed, some looked sober about it, but all thought it was outrageous. Sedgwick was the only person who rebuked him, and he did it in a manner rather too measured and moderate for my taste . . . About eleven o'clock we got away from Lord Fitzwilliam's and went to Mr. Babbage's, who, at this season, gives three or four routs on successive weeks. It was very crowded to-night, and very brilliant; for among the people there were Hallam, Milman and his pretty wife; the Bishop of Norwich,—Stanley,—the Bishop of Hereford, —Musgrave,—both the Hellenists; Rogers, Sir J. Herschel and his beautiful wife, Sedgwick, Mrs. Somerville and her daughters, Senior, the Taylors, Sir F. Chantrey, Jane Porter, Lady Morgan, and I know not how many others. We seemed really to know as many people as we should in a party at home, which is a rare thing in a strange capital, and rarest of all in this vast overgrown London. Notwithstanding, therefore, our fatiguing day, we enjoyed it very much.
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