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C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 174 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 54 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 24 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 8 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 6 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 4 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 4 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 4 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, Germany and its Tribes (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 2 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 2 0 Browse Search
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Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Chapter 25 (search)
might say, of the state. It was furthermore stipulated in the agreement that when tribunes had served their year of office they should see that an equal number of tribunes were appointed in their place, and that if they failed to do this they should be burned aliveDiodorus is the only authority for this law, which probably derives from the story of the burning to death of nine tribunes (Valerius Maximus 6.3.2; Dio Cassius fr. 22).; also, in case the tribunes could not agree among themselves, the will of the interceding tribune must not be prevented.Some such a provision as this may be hidden in to\n a)na\ me/son kei/menon. See Eduard Meyer, "Untersuchungen über Diodors römische Geschichte," Rhein. Museum, 37 (1882), 610-627, especially pp. 618 ff., where he discusses the defective tradition which Diodorus has followed in the legislation described above. Such then, we find, was the conclusion of the civil discord in Rome
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Messenia, chapter 34 (search)
From Messene to the mouth of the Pamisus is a journey of eighty stades. The Pamisus is a pure stream flowing through cultivated lands, and is navigable some ten stades from the sea. Sea-fish run up it, especially in spring, as they do up the Rhine and Maeander. The chief run of fish is up the stream of the Achelous, which discharges opposite the Echinades islands. But the fish that enter the Pamisus are of quite a different kind, as the water is pure and not muddy like the rivers which I have mentioned. The grey mullet, a fish that loves mud, frequents the more turbid streams. The rivers of Greece contain no creatures dangerous to men as do the Indus and the Egyptian Nile, or again the Rhine and Danube, the Euphrates and Phasis. These indeed produce man-eating creatures of the worst, in shape resembling the cat-fish of the Hermus and Maeander, but of darker color and stronger. In these respects the cat-fish is inferior. The Indus and Nile both contain crocodiles, and the Nile river-h
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Arcadia, chapter 28 (search)
alth. Scopas was the artist. The natives also say that Alexander the son of Philip dedicated to Asclepius his breastplate and spear. The breastplate and the head of the spear are still there to-day. Through Gortys flows a river called by those who live around its source the Lusius (Bathing Riuer), because Zeus after his birth was bathed in it; those farther from the source call it the Gortynius after the village. The water of this Gortynius is colder than that of any other river. The Danube, Rhine, Hypanis, Borysthenes, and all rivers the streams of which freeze in winter, as they flow through land on which there is snow the greater part of the time, while the air about them is full of frost, might in my opinion rightly be called wintry; I call the water cold of those which flow through a land with a good climate and in summer have water refreshing to drink and to bathe in, without being painful in winter. Cold in this sense is the water of the Cydnus which passes through Tarsus, and
Strabo, Geography, Book 7, chapter 1 (search)
Now that I have described Iberia and the Celtic and Italian tribes, along with the islands near by, it will be next in order to speak of the remaining parts of Europe, dividing them in the approved manner. The remaining parts are: first, those towards the east, being those which are across the Rhenus and extend as far as the TanaïsThe Don. and the mouth of Lake Maeotis,The sea of Azof. and also all those regions lying between the AdriasThe Adriatic. and the regions on the left of the Pontic Sea that are shut off by the IsterThe Danube. and extend towards the south as far as Greece and the Propontis;The Sea of Marmora. for this river divides very nearly the whole of the aforesaid land into two parts. It is the largest of the European rivers, at the outset flowing towards the south and then turning straight from the west towards the east and the Pontus. It rises in the western limits of Germany, as also near the recess of the Adriatic (at a distance from it of about one thousand st
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War, Book 1, chapter 1 (search)
to the Germans, who dwell beyond the Rhine , with whom they are continually waging war; for which reRhine , with whom they are continually waging war; for which reason the Helvetii also surpass the rest of the Gauls in valor, as they contend with the Germans in almost daily battles, when they either repel tani and the Helvetii, upon the river Rhine , and stretches toward the north. The Belgae rises from tRhine , and stretches toward the north. The Belgae rises from the extreme frontier of Gaul, extend to the lower part of the river Rhine ; and l Rhine ; and look toward the north and the rising sun. Aquitania extends from the river Garonne to the Pyrenaean mountains and to thaRhine ; and look toward the north and the rising sun. Aquitania extends from the river Garonne to the Pyrenaean mountains and to that part of the ocean which is near Spain: it looks between the setting of the sun, and the north star.
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War, Book 1, chapter 2 (search)
whole of Gaul. To this he the more easily persuaded them, because the Helvetii, are confined on every side by the nature of their situation; on one side by the Rhine , a very broad and deep river, which separates the Helvetian territory from the Germans; on a second side by the Jura , a very high mouRhine , a very broad and deep river, which separates the Helvetian territory from the Germans; on a second side by the Jura , a very high mountain, which is [situated] between the Sequani and the Helvetii; on a third by the Lake of Geneva, and by the river Rhone, which separates our Province from the Helvetii. From these circumstances it resulted, that they could range less widely, and could less easily make war upon their neighbors; for which reason men fond of war [as they were] were affec
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War, Book 1, chapter 5 (search)
ci, and the Tulingi, and the Latobrigi, their neighbors, to adopt the same plan, and after burning down their towns and villages, to set out with them: and they admit to their party and unite to themselves as confederates the Boii, who had dwelt on the other side of the Rhine , and had crossed over into the Norican territory, and assaulted Noreia. ci, and the Tulingi, and the Latobrigi, their neighbors, to adopt the same plan, and after burning down their towns and villages, to set out with them: and they admit to their party and unite to themselves as confederates the Boii, who had dwelt on the other side of the Rhine , and had crossed over into the Norican territory, and assaulted Noreia.
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War, Book 1, chapter 27 (search)
their arms, they should suffer punishment, or else induced by the hope of safety, because they supposed that, amid so vast a multitude of those who had surrendered themselves, their flight might either be concealed or entirely overlooked, having at night-fall departed out of the camp of the Helvetii, hastened to the Rhine and the territories of the Germans. their arms, they should suffer punishment, or else induced by the hope of safety, because they supposed that, amid so vast a multitude of those who had surrendered themselves, their flight might either be concealed or entirely overlooked, having at night-fall departed out of the camp of the Helvetii, hastened to the Rhine and the territories of the Germans.
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War, Book 1, chapter 28 (search)
ccount, because he was unwilling that the country, from which the Helvetii had departed, should be untenanted, lest the Germans, who dwell on the other side of the Rhine , should, on account of the excellence of the lands, cross over from their own territories into those of the Helvetii, and become borderers upon the province of Gaul and the Rhine , should, on account of the excellence of the lands, cross over from their own territories into those of the Helvetii, and become borderers upon the province of Gaul and the Allobroges. He granted the petition of the Aedui, that they might settle the Boii, in their own (i. e. in the Aeduan) territories, as these were known to be of distinguished valor, to whom they gave lands, and whom they afterward admitted to the same state of rights and freedom as themselves.
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War, Book 1, chapter 31 (search)
[i.e. of the Germans] had at first crossed the Rhine : but after that these wild and savage men had become enaRhine : but after that these wild and savage men had become enamored of the lands and the refinement and the abundance of the Gauls, more were brought over, that there were now as many as all the Germans would cross the Rhine ; for neither must the land of Gaul be compared with the Rhine ; for neither must the land of Gaul be compared with the land of the Germans, nor must the habit of living of the latter be put on a level with that of the former. Moreover, [as for]f Germans being brought over the Rhine , and could protect all Gaul from the outrages of mans being brought over the Rhine , and could protect all Gaul from the outrages of Ariovistus.
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