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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 464 0 Browse Search
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Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 106 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 74 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter). You can also browse the collection for Greece (Greece) or search for Greece (Greece) in all documents.

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Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter), line 1 (search)
ut its whirlpools in the frequent winds and twists the darkening waves, my father sacrificed me to Artemis for Helen's sake, or so he thought, in the famous clefts of Aulis. For there lord Agamemnon mustered his expedition of a thousand ships of Hellas, wanting to take the crown of Troy in glorious victory and avenge the outrage to Helen's marriage, doing this favor for Menelaus. But when he met with dreadful winds that would not let him sail, he went to burnt sacrifices, and Calchas had this to say: “"Lord and general of Hellas, Agamemnon, you will not set free your ships from land until Artemis has your daughter Iphigenia as a victim. For you once vowed to sacrifice to the torch-bearing goddess the most beautiful creature brought forth that year; then your wife, Clytemnestra, bore a child in your house—ascribing the prize of beauty to me—whom you must sacrifice.” And by the craft of Odysseus, they took me from my mother, pretending a marriage with Achilles. I came to Aulis; held
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter), line 67 (search)
east, are red with blood. Orestes Do you see the spoils hanging from the very walls? Pylades Trophies of strangers that have been slain. But I must look all around and keep careful watch. Orestes O Phoebus, where have you again brought me into the snare, by your oracles, since I avenged my father's blood by the murder of my mother, and was driven by successive Furies, a fugitive, away from the land, and completed many winding courses; and coming to you I asked how I might arrive at an end to whirling madness and my labors, which I have carried out, wandering all over Hellas. . . . And you told me to go to the boundaries of the Tauric land, where Artemis, your sister, has an altar, and to take the statue of the goddess, which is said here to have fallen to this temple from heaven; and, taking it by craft of some stroke of luck, to complete the venture by giving it to the Athenian land—what was to come next was not spoken of—and if I did this, I would have rest from my labor
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter), line 123 (search)
Chorus Keep a holy silence, you who inhabit the double clashing rocks of the Black Sea! O daughter of Leto, Dictynna of the mountains, to your hall, to the golden walls of your temple with beautiful pillars, I, the servant of the holy key-holder, bend my holy virgin steps. For I have left the towers and walls of Hellas, famous for horses, and Europe with its forests, my father's home. I have come. What is the news? What is troubling you? Why have you brought me, brought me to the shrine, you who are the daughter of Atreus' son, master of a thousand ships and ten thousand soldiers, who came to the towers of Troy with a famous fleet?
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter), line 295 (search)
ay their swords; they sank on their knees to the ground, in weariness. Then we brought them to the lord of this land. He saw them, and at once sent them to you, for purification and slaughter. You have prayed for such sacrificial victims as these strangers, lady; if you destroy them, Hellas will make atonement for your murder and pay the penalty for the sacrifice in Aulis. Chorus Leader You have told an amazing story about this madman, whoever he is, who has come from Hellas to the Black Sea.ay their swords; they sank on their knees to the ground, in weariness. Then we brought them to the lord of this land. He saw them, and at once sent them to you, for purification and slaughter. You have prayed for such sacrificial victims as these strangers, lady; if you destroy them, Hellas will make atonement for your murder and pay the penalty for the sacrifice in Aulis. Chorus Leader You have told an amazing story about this madman, whoever he is, who has come from Hellas to the Black Sea.
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter), line 439 (search)
Chorus Would that, by my mistress' prayers, Helen, Leda's dear child, might happen to leave Troy and come here, where she might die, crowned over her hair by the bloody water, her throat cut by the hands of my mistress, and so pay her requital. But what a sweet message I should receive, if a sailor came from Hellas, to put an end to my wretched slavery! For may I even in dreams be at home and in my ancestral city, the enjoyment of pleasant sleep, a grace we have in common with prosperity.
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter), line 456 (search)
Chorus Leader But here come the two youths, with tightly bound hands, the new sacrifice for the goddess; silence, my friends. These first-fruits of Hellas are indeed approaching the temple; the herdman did not deliver a false message. Lady Artemis, if this city carries out the rites in a way pleasing to you, accept the victims, which the custom among us declares to be unholy.
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter), line 492 (search)
Iphigenia Which of you is called by the name of Pylades? I want to know this first. Orestes That one, if you have any pleasure in the knowledge. Iphigenia Of what city of Hellas were you born a citizen? Orestes What would you gain by learning this, lady? Iphigenia Are you brothers, from one mother? Orestes By friendship, yes; we are not brothers by birth, lady. Iphigenia What name did your father give you? Orestes I might rightly be called Unfortunate. Iphigenia I do not ask that; as back to Menelaus' home? Orestes She has; it was an unfortunate arrival for one dear to me. Iphigenia And where is she? She deserves an ill turn from me also. Orestes She lives at Sparta with her former bedfellow. Iphigenia Creature hated by Hellas, not by me alone! Orestes I have also had some benefit from the marriage of that woman! Iphigenia Have the Achaeans returned, as reported? Orestes How you put everything together and ask me all at once! Iphigenia Before you die, I want to pro
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter), line 540 (search)
Orestes Who are you? How well you ask about Hellas! Iphigenia I am from there; while still a child I was lost. Orestes Then rightly you desire to know what has happened there, lady. Iphigenia What about the general, who is said to be happy? Orestes Who? The one I knew was not happy. Iphigenia There was said to be a certain lord, Agamemnon, son of Atreus. Orestes I do not know; leave this subject, lady. Iphigenia No, by the gods, but tell me, stranger, to delight me. Orestes The wretched man is dead, and in addition he destroyed another. Iphigenia Dead? By what fate? I am unhappy! Orestes Why do you mourn for this? It doesn't concern you, does it? Iphigenia I grieve for his former prosperity. Orestes Yes, for he was dreadfully murdered by a woman. Iphigenia O miserable the slayer . . . and the slain! Orestes Stop now, and do not ask further. Iphigenia Only this much, if the wife of the wretched man is alive. Orestes She is not; she was killed by the son that she bo
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter), line 687 (search)
te. If you are saved and get sons from my sister, whom I gave to you for wife, my name would remain and the whole house of my father would not be wiped out in childlessness. But go, and live, and dwell in my father's house. And when you come to Hellas and to Argos of the horses, I charge you, by this right hand: heap up a tomb and build a memorial for me, and let my sister give her hair and tears to the tomb. Report that I died at the hand of an Argive woman, at an altar, purified for death. d by marriage. And now farewell; I have found you the dearest of my friends, you who have hunted with me, grown up with me, and borne with me many miseries. Phoebus, though a prophet, has deceived me; creating his plot, he drove me far away from Hellas, ashamed of his earlier prophecies. I gave him my all and trusted in his words, killed my mother, and myself perish in turn. Pylades You will have a tomb, and I will never betray your sister's bed, unhappy youth, since I will hold you dearer wh
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter), line 1056 (search)
er I am to succeed, or come to nothing and lose my country, and my dear brother and dearest sister. And first of all, I begin my speech with this: we are women, and have hearts naturally formed to love each other, and keep our common interests most secure. Be silent for us and assist us in our flight. It is good to have trustworthy speech. You see how one fortune holds us three, most dear to each other, either to return to our native land, or to die. If I am saved, I will bring you safe to Hellas, so that you may share my fortune. By your right hand, I entreat you, and you, and you; you by your dear face, by your knees, by all that is dearest to you in your home: father, mother, child, if you have children. What do you reply? Who agrees with us, or is not willing to do this—speak! For if you do not acquiesce in my words, both I and my unhappy brother must die. Chorus Leader Have courage, dear mistress, only see to your safety; I will be silent on all that you have charged me with—
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