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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 40 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 25 3 Browse Search
John James Geer, Beyond the lines: A Yankee prisoner loose in Dixie 19 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Columbus (Mississippi, United States) or search for Columbus (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 24: Second attack on Vicksburg, etc. (search)
ng Sherman in his attack on that place. This was all Grant proposed to do, although it was suggested that in case Pemberton retreated before him, Grant would follow him up. Grant moved towards Granada and everything looked well, but the Confederate general, Earl Van Dorn, dashed into Holly Springs twenty-eight miles in the rear of the Union Army, capturing the garrison and all their stores. At the same time General Forrest pushed his cavalry into West Tennessee, cutting the railroad to Columbus at several points between that place and Jackson. This completely cut Grant off from his only line of communication with the North and also from his several commands. Due precautions had been taken to prevent this mishap by leaving a strong force behind at Holly Springs, but the commanding officer was not on the alert and his capture was a complete surprise. In this raid of the Confederates a million dollars' worth of stores were destroyed. Under the circumstances it was impossible fo
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
A. L. Rives, Lieutenant-Colonel and Acting-Chief of Bureau. Letter of T. E. Courtenay to Col. H. E. Clark. Richmond, Virginia, Jan. 19, 1864. My Dear Colonel — I hope you have received all my letters. I wrote two to Mobile, one to Columbus, and two to Brandon. I now send this by a party who is going to Shreveport, and promised to learn your whereabouts so as to forward it to you. I have met with much delay and annoyance since you left. The castings have all been completed somis to be hoped that the former will live to see their names honorably mentioned while that of their leader is withheld as unworthy of notice. On the 13th of April, the Confederates, taking advantage of the absence of the gun-boats, marched on Columbus. Ky.; but when Colonel Lawrence, who commanded the post, refused to listen to a demand for its surrender, they turned upon Fort Pillow, and captured it after a desperate conflict. Fort Pillow was retaken by Lieutenant-Commander Fitch, but th