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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 46 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 18 0 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence. You can also browse the collection for Lee's Hill (Virginia, United States) or search for Lee's Hill (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 3 document sections:

Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 15: (search)
idence and certain hope, in common with our whole army, to the great battle which, in all human probability, would be joined at an early hour of the following day. 12th December. At an early hour of the morning we were again assembled on Lee's Hill, viewing the plain beneath us, from which the fogs of the night were just rising, and where the rays of the newly-risen sun revealed many thousands of Yankees who had crossed from the Stafford side of the river since the previous afternoon. Thof painful anxiety and impatience, the generals slowly returned, and we reached our horses without accident. We were now soon joined by Stuart, and all, except Jackson, who parted with us to regain the troops under his command, rode back to Lee's Hill, from which a desultory cannonade was still kept up. Here we found that one of our 32-pounder Parrott guns had burst only a few moments before — a disaster which was fortunately not attended with loss of life, but which came very near proving f
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 16: (search)
omentous conflict had indeed arrived. Our guest, Captain Phillips, believing that he should obtain a more extended and satisfactory view of the engagement from Lee's Hill than from the position of our cavalry on the right flank, made up his mind to separate himself from us for the day, and at an early hour we parted with this porn his own position on an eminence, within a few hundred yards of Hamilton's Crossing, which rose above the general elevation of the ridge in a similar manner to Lee's Hill on the left, and which has ever since borne the name of Jackson's Hill, from its having been rendered historical by the presence of the great warrior during theeartily upon having safely passed through the perils of the day, and who spoke with enthusiasm of the magnificent view of the battle which he had obtained from Lee's Hill. With a modest smile, Pelham returned to the Captain the bit of regimental ribbon he had worn as a talisman during the fight, its gay colours just a little bla
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 17: (search)
about preparing for them whatever comforts our rough hospitality could afford. After about an hour's ride we reached Lee's Hill, where we found Captain Phillips again, whom I invited to join me in a little tour to Marye's Heights and the field in the shells which, fired too high, had exploded in his neighbourhood and induced his rapid retreat. On our return to Lee's Hill we found a great number of the generals assembled around our Commander-in-Chief, all extremely chagrined that the Federiming at the flying horseman, and ever closer and closer flew the unpleasant missiles about his ears, while we who from Lee's Hill were spectators of the unenviable position in which our guest was placed, were for some time seriously alarmed that we the surface, when a covering of logs, chalk, and mud closed the mouth of this vast and awful tomb. On my return to Lee's Hill I saw President Davis and Governor Letcher with our Commander. They had come from Richmond to congratulate him and the