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William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 395 13 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 214 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 79 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 74 22 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 55 45 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 31 3 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 31 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 25 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 23 3 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery.. You can also browse the collection for Springfield (Illinois, United States) or search for Springfield (Illinois, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 109 results in 14 document sections:

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Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Speech of Hon. Abraham Lincoln, at Springfield June 17, 1858. (search)
Speech of Hon. Abraham Lincoln, at Springfield June 17, 1858. The following speech was delivered at Springfield, Ill., at the close of the Republican State Convention held at that time and place, and by which Convention Mr. Lincoln had been named as their candidate for U. S. Senator. Mr. Douglas was not present. Mr. President, and Gentlemen of the Convention: If we could first know where we are, and whither we are tending, we could better judge what to do, and how to do it. We are noSpringfield, Ill., at the close of the Republican State Convention held at that time and place, and by which Convention Mr. Lincoln had been named as their candidate for U. S. Senator. Mr. Douglas was not present. Mr. President, and Gentlemen of the Convention: If we could first know where we are, and whither we are tending, we could better judge what to do, and how to do it. We are now far into the fifth year, since a policy was initiated with the avowed object, and confident promise, of putting an end to slavery agitation. Under the operation of that policy, that agitation has not only not ceased, but has constantly augmented. In my opinion, it will not cease, until a crisis shall have been reached and passed. A house divided against itself cannot stand, I believe this government cannot endure permanently half slave and half free. I do not expect the Union to be dissol
n this question? Whenever you put a limitation upon the right of any people to decide what laws they want, you have destroyed fundamental principle of self-government. In connection with this subject, perhaps it will not be improper for me on this occasion to allude to the position of those who have chosen to arraign my conduct on this same subject. I have observed from the public prints that but a few days ago the Republican party of the State of Illinois assembled in Convention at Springfield, and not only laid down their platform, but nominated a Candidate for the United States Senate, as my successor. I take great pleasure in saying that I have known, personally and intimately for about a quarter of a century, the worthy gentleman who has been nominated for my place, and I will say that I regard him as a kind, amiable, and intelligent gentleman, a good citizen and an honorable opponent; and whatever issue I may have with him, will be of principle, and not involving personal
fear that I shall become tedious. I leave this branch of the subject to take hold of another. I take up that, part of Judge Douglas's speech in which he respectfully attended to me. Judge Douglas made two points upon my recent speech at Springfield. He says they are to be the issues of this campaign. The first one of these points he bases upon the language in a speech which I delivered at Springfield, which I believe I can quote correctly from memory. I said there that we are now far Springfield, which I believe I can quote correctly from memory. I said there that we are now far into the fifth year since a policy was instituted for the avowed object, and with the confident promise, of putting an end to slavery agitation ; under the operation of that policy, that agitation had only not ceased, but had constantly augmented. I believe it will not cease until a crisis shall have been reached and passed. A house divided against itself cannot stand. I believe this Government cannot endure permanently half slave and half free. I do not expect the Union to be dissolved -
hat end. And this brings me to the consideration of the two points at issue between Mr. Lincoln and myself. The Republican Convention, when it assembled at Springfield, did me and the country the honor of indicating the man who was to be their standard-bearer, and the embodiment of their principles in this State. I owe them min accordance with the genius of our free institutions, the peace and harmony of the Republic, than those which I advocate. He tells you, in his speech made at Springfield, before the Convention which gave him his unanimous nomination, that: A house divided against itself cannot stand. I believe this Government cannott speech with great care, and will do him the justice to say that it is marked by eminent ability and great success in concealing what he did mean to say in his Springfield speech. His answer to this point, which I have been arguing, is, that he never did mean, and that I ought to know that he never intended to convey the idea, th
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Speech of Senator Douglas, delivered July 17, 1858, at Springfield, III (Mr. Lincoln was not present.) (search)
Speech of Senator Douglas, delivered July 17, 1858, at Springfield, III (Mr. Lincoln was not present.) Mr. Chairman and Fellow-Citizens of Springfield and Old Sangamon: My heart is filled with emotions at the allusions which have been so happily and so kindly made in the welcome just extended to me — a welcome so numerous and so enthusiastic, bringing me to my home among my old friends, that language cannot express my gratitude. I do feel at home whenever I return to old Sangamon and receSpringfield and Old Sangamon: My heart is filled with emotions at the allusions which have been so happily and so kindly made in the welcome just extended to me — a welcome so numerous and so enthusiastic, bringing me to my home among my old friends, that language cannot express my gratitude. I do feel at home whenever I return to old Sangamon and receive those kind and friendly greetings which have never failed to meet me when I have come among you ; but never before have I had such occasion to be grateful and to be proud of the manner of the reception as on the present. While I am willing, sir, to attribute a part of this demonstration to those kind and friendly personal relations to which you have referred, I cannot conceal from myself that the controlling and pervading element in this great mass of human beings is devotion to that princ
Speech of Hon. Abraham Lincoln, delivered in Springfield, Saturday evening, July 17, 1858. (Mr. Douglas was not present.) Fellow-Citizens: Another election, which is deemed an important one, is approaching, and, as I suppose, the Republican party will: without much difficulty, elect their State ticket. But in regard to the Legislature, we, the Republicans, labor under some disadvantages. In the first place, we have a Legislature to elect upon an apportionment of the representation made ot exist. They did what they could and yielded to the necessity for the rest. I also yield to all which follows from that necessity. What I would most desire would be the separation of the white and black races. One more point; on this Springfield speech which Judge Douglas says he has read so carefully. I expressed my belief in the existence of a conspiracy to perpetuate and nationalize slavery. I did not profess to know it, nor do I now. I showed the part Judge Douglas had played in
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., The following is the correspondence between the two rival candidates for the United States Senate: (search)
again at Blooming ton, Atlanta, Lincoln and Springfield where it was well known I went for the purp A. Douglas. Mr. Lincoln to Mr. Douglas. Springfield, July 29, 1858. Hon S. A. Douglas — Dearave been well known to you that you went to Springfield for the purpose of agreeing on the plan of that we have already spoken at Chicago and Springfield and that on both occasions I had the concluur hours after, I concluded again on you at Springfield. In the meantime, you had made another conclusion on me at Springfield which I did not hear, and of the contents of which I knew nothing whenaylight, and mine at night, of the 17th, at Springfield, were both made in perfect independence of m to-day a letter from you will reach me at Springfield. A. L. Mr. Douglas to Mr. Lincoln. rvant, S. A. Douglas, Hon. A. Lincoln Springfield, Ill. Mr. Lincoln to Mr. Douglas SpringfielSpringfield, July 31, 1858. Hon. S. A. Douglas-Dear Sir: Yours of yesterday, naming places, times and term[1 more...]
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., First joint debate, at Ottawa, August 21, 1858. (search)
ance of the arrangement, the parties met at Springfield in October, 1854, and proclaimed their new a Convention to form a Republican party at Springfield, and I think that my friend, Mr. Lovejoy, w holding them. When I made my speech at Springfield, of which the Judge complains, and from while while to one or two other things in that Springfield speech. My main object was to show, so fartion, the next time I met him, which was at Springfield, I used this expression, that I claimed no s an expression from me? In a speech at Springfield, on the night of the 17th, I thought I mighI want to remind Mr. Lincoln that he was at Springfield when that Convention was held and those resI was sick at the time, but I staid over in Springfield to hear his reply and to reply to him. On tr fact. I have here a newspaper printed at Springfield Mr. Lincoln's own town, in October, 1854, aect; but I did take objection to his second Springfield speech, in which he stated that he intended[7 more...]
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Second joint debate, at Freeport, August 27, 1858. (search)
were never passed in any Convention held in Springfield. It turns out that they were never passed f 1854, any Convention holding a session in Springfield, calling itself a Republican State Conventing or affirming whether they were passed at Springfield. Now it turns out that he had got hold of the resolutions at Kane county as those at Springfield, the amount of the responsibility being exathe resolutions in question were adopted at Springfield on the 5th of October, 1854. Although I wa Lanphier, editor of the State Register, at Springfield calling his attention to them, telling him auded by all the Abolitionists assembled in Springfield. So soon as Mr. Lincoln was done speaking,tions were adopted — and when I get down to Springfield I will investigate the matter and see whethLegislature when they assembled together at Springfield. In the first place, you must remember thatable conclusion to be drawn from his first Springfield speech is, that he is opposed to the admiss[9 more...]
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Third joint debate, at Jonesboro, September 15, 1858. (search)
in the North, anti-Nebraska men down about Springfield, and in this neighborhood they contented ths that year, and progressed as far south as Springfield, I was met and opposed in discussion by Lin the name of the Black Republican party; at Springfield, they dare not call a Republican Conventionould, I will call Col. James H. Matheny, of Springfield, to the stand, Mr. Lincoln's especial confihis document, since his production of those Springfield resolutions at Ottawa. I do not wish to dw complaining of what I said in my speech at Springfield, in which he says I accepted my nomination ained it, as Judge Douglas has read from my Springfield speech. Now, my friends, there is one o in this State met on the 21st of April, at Springfield, and passed a set of resolutions which theylling themselves National Democrats, met in Springfield and adopted a set of resolutions which are not know ; but I know that in his speech at Springfield be spoke of it as a thing they had not deci[1 more...]
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