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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Crown Point, (search)
e head of Lake George, where his camp was protected on two sides by an impassable swamp. Informed of this movement of the French and Indian allies (Sept. 7), Johnson sent forward (Sept. 8) 1,000 Massachusetts troops, under the command of Col. Ephraim Williams, and 200 Mohawk Indians, under King Hendrick, to intercept the enemy. The English fell into an ambuscade. Williams and Hendrick were both killed, and their followers fell back in Crown Point. great confusion to Johnson's camp, hotlyWilliams and Hendrick were both killed, and their followers fell back in Crown Point. great confusion to Johnson's camp, hotly pursued. The latter had heard of the disaster before the fugitives appeared, cast up breastworks of logs and limbs, and placed two cannon upon them, and was prepared to receive the pursuers of the English. Dieskau and his victorious troops came rushing on, without suspicion of being confronted with artillery. They came, a motley host, with swords, pikes, muskets, and tomahawks, and made a spirited attack, but at the discharge of cannon the Indians fled in terror to the forests. So, also, di
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Whiting, Nathan 1724-1771 (search)
Whiting, Nathan 1724-1771 Military officer; born in Windham, Conn., May 4, 1724; graduated at Yale College in 1743; became a merchant in New Haven in 1745; appointed lieutenant-colonel of the 2d Connecticut Regiment at the outbreak of the French and Indian War in 1755; was with Col. Ephraim Williams when that officer was surprised by the French and Indians, and upon his death retreated with great coolness and skill; promoted colonel in 1756 and served to the close of the war. He died in New Haven, Conn., April 9, 1771.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Williams, Ephraim 1715- (search)
Williams, Ephraim 1715- Military officer; born in Newtown, Mass., Feb. 24, 1715; was a mariner in early life, and made several voyages to Europe. From 1740 to 1748 he served against the French, in Canada, as captain of a provincial company. He joined the New York forces under Gen. William Johnson, in 1755, and, falling in an Indian ambush, was killed near Lake George, Sept. 8, 1755. Before joining in this expedition he made his will, bequeathing his property to a township west of Fort Massachusetts, on the condition that it should be called Williamstown, the money to be used for the establishment and maintenance of a free school. The school was opened in 1791, and was incorporated a college in 1793, under the title of Williams College (q. v.).
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Williams, William 1731-1811 (search)
Williams, William 1731-1811 Signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Lebanon, Conn., April 18, 1731; graduated at Harvard College in 1757, and was on the staff of his relative, Col. Ephraim Williams, when he was killed near Lake George in 1755. An active patriot and a member of the committee of correspondence and safety in Connecticut, he was sent to Congress in 1776. He wrote several essays to arouse the spirit of liberty in the bosoms of his countrymen, and spent nearly all hdence and safety in Connecticut, he was sent to Congress in 1776. He wrote several essays to arouse the spirit of liberty in the bosoms of his countrymen, and spent nearly all his property in the cause. He had been speaker of the Connecticut Assembly in 1775, and in 1783-84 was again a member of Congress. He was also a member of the convention of Connecticut that adopted the national Constitution. Mr. Williams married a daughter of Governor Trumbull. He died in Lebanon, Conn., Aug. 2, 1811.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Williams College, (search)
Williams College, An educational institution in Williamstown, Mass., founded by Col. Ephraim Williams (q. v.). The funds left by Colonel Williams for founding a free school were allowed to accumulate. A free school was incorporated in 1785, under the control of nine trustees, and a lottery was granted for raising funds to erect a schoolhouse. About $3,500 was thus obtained, when the inhabitants of the town contributed about $2,000 more. A large building, four stories high (afterwards thColonel Williams for founding a free school were allowed to accumulate. A free school was incorporated in 1785, under the control of nine trustees, and a lottery was granted for raising funds to erect a schoolhouse. About $3,500 was thus obtained, when the inhabitants of the town contributed about $2,000 more. A large building, four stories high (afterwards the West College) was erected in 1790, and on Oct. 20, 1791, the free school was opened, with Rev. Ebenzer Fitch as its first principal. It was incorporated a college in 1793, under the title of Williams's Hall. The property vested in the free school was transferred to the college, and the State appropriated $4,000 for the purchase of apparatus and a library. Mr. Fitch was its first president, and the first commencement was in 1795, when four students graduated. Its catalogue of students print
three sons and John five, there are multitudes of Edward's posterity, who bear his name, and only five of John's. Forty-four of Edward's descendants were in the Revolutionary Army, from Newton, and not one of John's. Now (1854) there are but three families in town of Edward's descendants, that bear his name. (Pages 332, 333.) 1 insert here a single family of the older branch: 4. Abraham, s. of John (2), m. Elizabeth, dau. of John Biscoe of Wat., and had Elizabeth, b. 8 Aug. 1680, m. Ephraim Williams, and d. before 1739, leaving two sons, Ephraim, a distinguished soldier, and the founder of Williams College; and Thomas, a physician in Hatfield; John, b. 25 Ap. 1682; Sarah, b. 21 Aug. 1684, m. Joseph Fuller, Jr., and was mother of Hon. Abraham Fuller; Margaret, b. 1685, m. Henry Bright; Mary, b. 2 Dec. 1686, d. young; Hannah, m. James Trowbridge, Jr., 1712; Mary, b. 19 Jan. 1689, m Daniel Cook — Ap. 1722; Abigail, b. 21 Mar. 1690, d. young; Abigail, b. 1692, d. 26 Jan. 1703; Abraham,
three sons and John five, there are multitudes of Edward's posterity, who bear his name, and only five of John's. Forty-four of Edward's descendants were in the Revolutionary Army, from Newton, and not one of John's. Now (1854) there are but three families in town of Edward's descendants, that bear his name. (Pages 332, 333.) 1 insert here a single family of the older branch: 4. Abraham, s. of John (2), m. Elizabeth, dau. of John Biscoe of Wat., and had Elizabeth, b. 8 Aug. 1680, m. Ephraim Williams, and d. before 1739, leaving two sons, Ephraim, a distinguished soldier, and the founder of Williams College; and Thomas, a physician in Hatfield; John, b. 25 Ap. 1682; Sarah, b. 21 Aug. 1684, m. Joseph Fuller, Jr., and was mother of Hon. Abraham Fuller; Margaret, b. 1685, m. Henry Bright; Mary, b. 2 Dec. 1686, d. young; Hannah, m. James Trowbridge, Jr., 1712; Mary, b. 19 Jan. 1689, m Daniel Cook — Ap. 1722; Abigail, b. 21 Mar. 1690, d. young; Abigail, b. 1692, d. 26 Jan. 1703; Abraham,
eut. Colonel, U. S. Vols., Aug. 15, 1865. Mustered out, Aug. 18, 1865. Died at San Francisco, Cal., Jan. 17, 1886. Wilder, Charles B. Born in Massachusetts. Captain, Assistant Quartermaster, U. S. Volunteers, Feb. 19, 1863. Mustered out, Mar. 30, 1866. Died, May 7, 1882. Wiley, Daniel day. See General Officers. Wilkins, Charles. Born in Massachusetts. Military Storekeeper, Ordnance Department, U. S. Army, Feb. 3, 1862. Died at Detroit Arsenal, Jan. 18, 1865. Williams, Ephraim. Born in Massachusetts. Private, 27th Mass. Infantry, Aug. 27, 1862. Second Lieutenant, 1st U. S. Volunteers, Apr. 18, 1864. First Lieutenant, July 9, 1864. Mustered out, May 10, 1866. Second Lieutenant, 5th U. S. Infantry, Feb. 23, 1866. First Lieutenant, July 28, 1866. Brevet Captain, U. S. Army, Sept. 23, 1867. Retired, Apr. 3, 1869. Williams, Henry B. Born in Massachusetts. Captain, Commissary of Subsistence, U. S. Volunteers, June 9, 1862. Resigned, Oct. 4, 1862.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2, Index of names of persons. (search)
J. N., 391 Willard, Robert, 154 Willard, Samuel, 372 Willard, Sidney, 233 Willard, Wells, 372 Willcomb, C. L., 154 Willey, J. C., 372 Willey, J. S., 372 Willey, W. H., 26th Mass. Inf., 372 Willey, W. H., 14th U. S. Colored H. A., 497 Williams, A. G., 391 Williams, C. F., Jr., 373 Williams, C. H., 373 Williams, Caroline T., 585 Williams, Charles, 483 Williams, D. R., 585 Williams, E. L. M., Mrs., 585 Williams, E. P., 731 Williams, Edwin, 497 Williams, Emily L., 585 Williams, Ephraim, 454, 567 Williams, G. D., 373 Williams, G. F., 731 Williams, G. S., 571 Williams, G. W., 731 Williams, George, Navy, 154 Williams, George, 585 Williams, H. B., 454 Williams, H. P., 373 Williams, J. A., 154 Williams, J. B., 373, 585 Williams, J. H., 373 Williams, J. M. S., 585 Williams, J. O., 373 Williams, James, S., 154 Williams, Jesse S., 373 Williams, M. F., 373 Williams, Philander, 373 Williams, R. S., 483 Williams, Robert, 1st Mass. Cav., 202, 233, 454, 567
night following the seventh of September, it was told in the camp at Lake George, that a large party of men had landed at the head of South Bay, and were travelling from Wood Creek to the Hudson. On the next morning, after a council of war, Ephraim Williams, a Massachusetts colonel, the same who, in passing through Albany, had made a bequest of his estate by will to found a free school, was sent with a thousand men to relieve Fort Edward. Among chap. IX.} 1755. them was Israel Putnam, to whorty were entirely within the ambush, the French Indians showed themselves to the Mohawks, but without firing on their kindred, leaving the Abenakis and Canadians to make the attack. Hendrick, who alone was on horseback, was killed on the spot. Williams also fell; but Nathan Whiting, of New Haven, conducted the retreat in good order, often rallying and turning to fire. The camp had still no intrenchments. When the noise of musketry was heard, two or three cannon were hastily brought up from
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