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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 54 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 40 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 9 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 9 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. T. Wofford or search for W. T. Wofford in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General S. D. Lee's report of the battle of Chickasaw bayou. (search)
le below Chickasaw bayou), driving in our pickets. Colonel Withers, with the Seventeenth Louisiana, two companies of the Forty-sixth Mississippi and a section of Wofford's battery, was directed to hold them in check near Mrs. Lake's plantation. This he did in good style, driving them from the open field into the woods. Early on cautious. About 9 A. M. he attempted to throw a pontoon bridge over the lake to my left. This was soon thwarted by a few well directed shots from the section of Wofford's battery and a section of guns commanded by Lieutenant Tarleton, of Major Ward's artillery battalion. As soon as the attempt to pontoon the lake was discovered,; Colonel Easterling, Forty-sixth Mississippi, and Colonel Richardson, deserve favorable notice. Of the artillery, I would particularly mention Major Holmes. Captain Wofford exhibited great gallantry and coolness, and to him is due more credit than to any one else for such defences as were at Chickasaw bayou, he having planned and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of the Wilderness. (search)
igades of Generals Mahone, G. T. Anderson and Wofford beyond the enemy's left, and to attack him onadvance — Anderson's brigade on the right and Wofford's on the left, Mahone being in the centre. Tobstinately that I endeavored to bring up General Wofford's brigade to extend my right, but that ofnes being rectified, and Field's division and Wofford's brigade of my own having arrived, upon the suggestion of Brigadier-General Wofford, a movement was organized, under the orders of the Lieutena as far as the Brock road, and pursued by General Wofford to some distance across the Plank road, wadvanced as far as the position still held by Wofford's brigade, when two or three shots were fired my troops became no more engaged, except General Wofford, who moved against the enemy in the aftered to join and co-operate with Anderson's and Wofford's brigades of that corps in an attack upon th the immediate direction of this movement. Wofford and Anderson were already in motion, and in a[2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General C. M. Wilcox on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
terminated about sunset or a little after sunset, it was not a three hours fight, as General Longstreet would have it believed,--at least not for Barksdale's and Wofford's brigades, or in truth for any part of McLaws' division. As to the second charge, that of uncovering McLaws' flank, I denied it positively, and stated, on thes, and one of his regiments separated by a considerable distance to the right. Then there is a much wider interval between this detached regiment and the left of Wofford's brigade, the nearest Confederate troops to the right of it. I will now make reference to official reports, and it will, I think, be made clear that General Lhis was so with the left brigades of the division. The order of McLaws' advance was Kershaw's brigade, followed by Semmes' on the right, Barksdale's, followed by Wofford's on the left. It is proper to refer to the fact that up to the time of the advance of Hood, neither Round Top nor Little Round Top were occupied by the enemy, n