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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 654 2 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 393 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 58 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 44 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 44 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 40 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 28 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 26 2 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 19 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for George Ticknor or search for George Ticknor in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 4: College Life.—September, 1826, to September, 1830.—age, 15-19. (search)
uite two hundred. Rev. John T. Kirkland was the president. Among the professors were Edward T. Channing in rhetoric, George Ticknor in French and Spanish literature, John S. Popkin in Greek, George Otis in Latin, Levi Hedge in logic and metaphysics, among the foremost. An illustration of his industry in this department may here be given. The students attending Professor Ticknor's lectures were each provided with a printed syllabus of leading dates and events. Sumner attended, in his Sophomos and fulness, and such fidelity to the instructor's style, that they might be now read with advantage to a class. Professor Ticknor, hearing of the notes, requested Sumner's father to send them to him. On returning them, July 7, 1828, he wrote: I New England; and, in August, received the second prize of thirty dollars. The committee of award were John Pickering, George Ticknor, and Rev. John G. Palfrey. The tradition is that Sumner's dissertation suffered in the comparison from its great len
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 6: Law School.—September, 1831, to December, 1833.—Age, 20-22. (search)
emagne Tower. Cambridge, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 1832 my dear friend,—... Yesterday, Dane Law College (situated just north of Rev. Mr. Newell's church), a beautiful Grecian temple, with four Ionic pillars in front,—the most architectural and the best-built edifice belonging to the college,—was dedicated to the law. Quincy delivered a most proper address of an hour, full of his strong sense and strong language. Webster, J. Q. Adams, Dr. Bowditch, Edward Everett, Jeremiah Mason, Judge Story, Ticknor, leaders in the eloquence, statesmanship, mathematics, scholarship, and law of our good land, were all present,—a glorious company. The Law School have requested a copy for the press. It will of a certainty be given. I shall send you the address when published. When you again visit Cambridge you will be astonished at the changes that have been wrought,—trees planted, common fenced, new buildings raised, and others designed. Quincy is a man of life, and infuses a vigor into all tha
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
d to writing upon prison systems. He was the German translator of Ticknor's History of Spanish Literature. Foelix, the editor of the Revue Épe, and was grateful for access to those written by Mr. Rand and Mr. Ticknor while they were abroad, and to those received by Mr. Daveis from, having passed more than a year in Europe after his election as Mr. Ticknor's successor, assumed in Dec., 1836, the duties of his professorsndly read to me, a few evenings since, portions of late letters from Mr. and Mrs. Ticknor. They spoke of a dinner at Lord Holland's, where MMrs. Ticknor. They spoke of a dinner at Lord Holland's, where Mr. T. conversed much with Lord Melbourne about literature, our politics, &c., the latter giving the palm to our present chief-magistrate Prs, and visits to Joanna Baillie and Mrs. Somerville. Life of George Ticknor, Vol. I. pp. 408, 412, 413. They were to start the day after te is a very pleasant fellow, and will at once assume the charge of Ticknor's department. Judge Story has written to Mittermaier; so also has
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 9: going to Europe.—December, 1837.—Age, 26. (search)
o make anybody else so to read them. And again, Nov. 2:— And now, my dear friend, my heart goes with you. I could say, Ventorumque regat pater, Obstrictis aliis; Horace, I. Ode III. 3. but the right winds and auspices and influences with my most fervent wishes will certainly follow you in all your wanderings. Write to me soon after you arrive at Paris; and especially and fully from England, where our admiration and affections fully meet. I have commended you very cordially to Ticknor, and I authorize you to draw upon him in my name to an unlimited extent. And now again, Farewell! Vive et Vale! Go, and God speed you! May you live to be an honor and blessing to your friends and society even more than you are now, and more than realize all our fondest wishes and anticipations. And so, Farewell! Always affectionately and faithfully yours. Dr. Channing wrote:— I need not speak to you of the usual perils of travelling. Local prejudice and illiberal notions
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 11: Paris.—its schools.—January and February, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
this letter can reach you Cleveland will be a married man; give my love to him, if he is in Boston. I have already written him to the care of Bishop Doane, Burlington. Tell Miss Austin that I had the happiness of placing her little packet in Mrs. Ticknor's hands on New Year's morning. Mrs. T. is delightful, and it does me good to see her. Every evening of my first week in Paris I passed with her. As ever, affectionately yours, C. S. Have seen Mademoiselle Mars in Moliere's Les Femmes Scture room passed to the consultation room, where the poor called and exhibited to him their ailments and received gratuitous attention, the students forming a circle around, and of course observing the patient. Feb. 11 (Sunday). Dined with Mr. Ticknor. After dinner an Italian came in, who was a literary man of some rank,—Ugoni. Camillo Ugoni, 1784-1856. He was a translator of Horace and Caesar; but his chief work was a History of Italian Literature. He was an exile from 1821 to 1838.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 12: Paris.—Society and the courts.—March to May, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
interested and inquired the name of the author. He was quite astonished when I told him that the historian had drawn from unpublished manuscripts and documents. Ticknor has placed a copy of the book in the hands of one or two French litterateurs, who have promised to review it in some of the French journals. Ticknor leaves for LTicknor leaves for London in a few days. I am sorry to lose him and his family. . . . Write me about the Jurist and all other things. I shall stay in Paris till the middle of April. I find ten times as much here to interest me as I anticipated. The lectures, the courts, the arts,—each would consume a year, to say nothing of the language which I amh Bonaparte spent the last days of his reign. I was shown the chamber in which he slept, and in which he made his last abdication. This morning I called, with Mr. Ticknor, on the Duc de Broglie, 1785-1870. He descended from an ancient family of Piedmontese origin, and married the only daughter of Madame de Stael. His honorabl
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 13: England.—June, 1838, to March, 1839.—Age, 27-28. (search)
Independence. He ranks among us with those Americans whom we would most willingly recognize as our countrymen,—Everett, Ticknor, Adams, Longfellow, Motley, and Winthrop,—all, I think, citizens of Massachusetts, and all equally welcome to England. own that it was and is to me as much a puzzle as the eminent and widespread success of your countryman and townsman, George Ticknor. Mr. Hayward contributed an article on Mr. Ticknor's Life to the Quarterly Review for July, 1876; pp. 160-201. At Mr. Ticknor's Life to the Quarterly Review for July, 1876; pp. 160-201. At the same time, I feel satisfied that, in each instance, the success was indisputable and well deserved. Lady Monteagle, daughter of Mr. John Marshall, writes:— I have a distinct recollection of the pleasant intercourse which I enjoyed withut on a sort of show-dress for the public, and which are very often, too, executed by inferior hands. Through my friend Ticknor first, and subsequently through you, I have had all the light I could desire; and I can have no doubt that to the good-n<