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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 4, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Sherman or search for Sherman in all documents.

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. Neither of these is possible. The passage of the 200,000 conscription law, without the exemption clause, alluded to in another portion of this day's issue produces neither surprise nor alarm. It confirms the terrible losses of Grant and Sherman, and was, indeed, passed in view of the latter. So at least says the New York Herald. Grant and Sherman have lost, within the last two months, nearly men enough to balance the whole number raised by this law. Put them in their hands, and they Sherman have lost, within the last two months, nearly men enough to balance the whole number raised by this law. Put them in their hands, and they will get them killed off in a very short time In the meantime the conscription of 200,000 men unconditionally, is apt to work favorably for peace in New England. The scoundrels there who live on it, and who have been more instrumental in keeping it alive than anybody else, will now have to shoulder arms themselves. They cannot put it off upon the Irish and Dutch, by paying a few hundred dollars. They must fight themselves, and being obliged to do it, they will be the loudest mouthed friends o
From the North. It was reported yesterday that a New York Herald, of the 29th of June, had been received in this city, and we made an unsuccessful attempt to trace it up. Many persons said they had seen it, but no one seemed to know who was its owner. Taking it for granted, however, that such a paper was in somebody's hands, we will give a summary of the news: The Herald, it is said, admits that Sherman has been cut off from his communication with his base of supplies at Chattanooga by Forrest's cavalry, his stores captured, and the Yankees, in short, whipped. The Washington Congress has passed a bill repealing the $300 exemption clause in the conscription law, and manifests a determination to get every available man into the field, with a view to filling up the depleted ranks of the Yankee armies, and a speedy crushing out of the rebellion. Hunter has arrived at Wheeling, and in his report makes out that his expedition was a complete success; says that he destroyed