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Turkey Bend (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
e Williamsburgh road, through White Oak swamp to the Charles City road, into which it debouched about eight miles from Turkey Bend in James River. The course then lay up the latter road towards Richmond, where it struck a little south-west by the Qhad no knowledge of any but the Quaker road to the point at which we now aimed — Hardin's Landing and Malvern Hill, in Turkey Bend. Sharp reconnoissance, however, had found another, and soon our tremendous land-fleet was sailing down two roads, andsigned to cut our column in twain. Long before this, our vanguard had debouched from the road into the fleld before Turkey Bend, and our reserve artillery was powerfully posted on Malvern Hill, a magnificent bluff covering Hardin's Landing, whereer the swiftly escaping trains, it was clear our troubles were not ended. We had again deceived the enemy by going to Turkey Bend. He had imagined we were marching to New-Market, destined to a point on Cliff Bottom road, near Fort Darling. It was
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 78
ne narrow road, while encompassed by enemies two-fold as strong as his army. W. D. B. A confederate narrative. this account was published in a pamphlet at Charleston, South-Carolina. The bloody checks which the Northern army, in its memorable advance up the Peninsula towards Richmond, had received at Williamsburgh and the Seven Pines, had taught Gen. McClellan the desperate character of the conflict, without which he could never hope to reach in triumph the capital of the confederate States. Accordingly, after the battle of the Seven Pines, his movements became exceedingly circumspect, and, although his army already largely outnumbered that which defended the beleaguered city, he kept calling constantly and urgently on his Government for reeenforcements. On Wednesday, June twenty-fifth, his army numbered, judging from the most authentic statements that are available, between one hundred and twenty-five thousand, and one hundred and thirty thousand effective men. With th
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
as repulsed the third time, he withdrew from that part of the field and did not renew the attempt. The tactics of the enemy were soon apparent. It was in massing troops and making sudden onslaughts on this and then on that portion of our columns, by which he expected to break them somewhere, and defeat if not rout us. His next movement was against our centre. Part of Jackson's column, reenforced by a large body from Hill's division, now made a desperate onset against the centre, the North-Carolina regiments being placed in front, and literally compelled to fight. Here the conflict was long and bloody, and reged for nearly two hours with great violence. The columns surged backward and forward, first one yielding and then the other. An idea of the great magnitude of this portion of the fight may be obtained, when I say that this part of the line was successively reenforced by McCall's reserves, the brigades of General Newton, Colonel Bartlett and Colonel Taylor, of Slocum's divis
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
s cheerless. That night we met reenforcements. Before morning the army was strengthened. Pray God it was made strong enough to go to Richmond. People, you may still rely on Gen. McClellan, until further displays of capacity. His retreat was masterly. He carried all that army and all his trains successfully through one narrow road, while encompassed by enemies two-fold as strong as his army. W. D. B. A confederate narrative. this account was published in a pamphlet at Charleston, South-Carolina. The bloody checks which the Northern army, in its memorable advance up the Peninsula towards Richmond, had received at Williamsburgh and the Seven Pines, had taught Gen. McClellan the desperate character of the conflict, without which he could never hope to reach in triumph the capital of the confederate States. Accordingly, after the battle of the Seven Pines, his movements became exceedingly circumspect, and, although his army already largely outnumbered that which defen
Pamunkey (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
terminated. It was now ascertained from prisoners that Stonewall Jackson had not joined Lee. Hence it was inferred that he was sweeping down the banks of the Pamunkey to seize the public property, and cut off our retreat in that direction. Gen. Stoneman's command was moved swiftly down to watch operations there, and orders welear but warm. At three o'clock A. M. Major-Gen. Jackson took up his line of march from Ashland, and proceeding down the country between the Chickahominy and Pamunkey rivers, he uncovered the front of Brig.-Gen. Branch by driving off the enemy collected on the north bank of the Chickahominy River, at the point where it is crossed pal avenues of supply and escape. The disposition of our forces was such as to cut off all communication between McClellan's army and the White House, on the Pamunkey River; he had been driven completely from his northern lines of defences; and it was supposed that he would be unable to extricate himself from his position without
Slocum (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
otected by the James, and flanks partially covered by gunboats. Tidings, however, had been received that the enemy was pushing swiftly upon us in several columns of immense numbers, apparently determined to crush us or drive us into the river that night. They opened fiercely with shell upon Smith's division at White Oak bridge. After burning down the house of a good secessionist, and breaking his leg, the enemy extended his line of fire, and soon engaged our entire rear-guard, striking at Slocum, who was guarding against a flank movement designed to cut our column in twain. Long before this, our vanguard had debouched from the road into the fleld before Turkey Bend, and our reserve artillery was powerfully posted on Malvern Hill, a magnificent bluff covering Hardin's Landing, where our gunboats were cruising. Here was a glorious prospect. Though our gallant fellows were bravely holding the fierce enemy at bay to cover the swiftly escaping trains, it was clear our troubles were
New Market (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
nguard had debouched from the road into the fleld before Turkey Bend, and our reserve artillery was powerfully posted on Malvern Hill, a magnificent bluff covering Hardin's Landing, where our gunboats were cruising. Here was a glorious prospect. Though our gallant fellows were bravely holding the fierce enemy at bay to cover the swiftly escaping trains, it was clear our troubles were not ended. We had again deceived the enemy by going to Turkey Bend. He had imagined we were marching to New-Market, destined to a point on Cliff Bottom road, near Fort Darling. It was not far away, and the enemy was massing his troops upon us on the left and on our new front; for when we arrived at Malvern Hill, the wings of the army as organized were reversed, Keyes taking the right, Porter's corps the left, as we faced Richmond. Our line now described a great arc, and there was fighting around three fourths of the perimeter. General McClellan, who had already communicated with the gunboats, retu
Darbytown (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
he Nine-mile or New-bridge road; the second as the Williamsburgh turnpike, running nearly parallel with the York River Railroad; the third as the Charles City turnpike, (which runs to the southward of the White Oak Swamp;) and the fourth as the Darbytown road. Commanding these several avenues were the forces of McClellan. Our own troops, with the exception of Jackson's corps, occupied a similar but of course smaller circle immediately around Richmond, the heaviest body being on the centre, sotreet and his own — engaged the enemy at a late hour in the evening. The battle was thus fought under the immediate and sole command of Gen. A. P. Hill, in charge of both divisions. The position of the enemy was about five miles northeast of Darbytown, on the New-Market road. The immediate scene of the battle was a plain of sedge lines, in the cover of which the enemy's forces were skilfully disposed. In advancing upon the enemy, batteries of sixteen heavy guns were opened upon the advan
Herring Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
that overlook the Westover and Berkeley estates, and which offer eligible positions for heavy guns. It will be seen that, protected on the south by the river and his gunboats, on the west by impassable ravines, and on the north and east by Herring Creek and the heights of Evelinton, the enemy's position presents but one pregnable point <*>the piece of level country north-west of Westover, and from a quarter to a half mile in width, lying between the head of the ravines and the point where HeHerring Creek crosses the Charles City road. But it required only a very brief period for the enemy, with his immense resources of men and machinery, to obstruct by art this only natural entrance to his stronghold. Already it was within range of his gunboats, and of his siege-guns planted on the Evelinton hills. Another day saw it strewn with felled timber and bristling with field-batteries. The James River was soon covered with the transports and gunboats of the enemy, and McClellan, secur
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
anced position on Fair Oaks Farm, near the Williamsburgh road. It provoked a sharp resistance, whien military faults are censured, bring not Williamsburgh up in judgment against heroic Sumner. NobTrent's, and opened upon our column on the Williamsburgh road with shell. At the same time they treninsula towards Richmond, had received at Williamsburgh and the Seven Pines, had taught Gen. McClepaign. Men who had gone through Manassas, Williamsburgh and the Seven Pines, declared that they haom the city. South of the railroad is the Williamsburgh road, connecting with theNine-mile road atter the enemy, and came up with him on the Williamsburgh road, a mile east of the Seven Pines, oppoted in a thick piece of pines north of the Williamsburgh road, behind intrenchments of great streng brigade and other troops marched down the Williamsburgh road, and dashed into the woods by a flankowed lowed the enemy on their track by the Williamsburgh road and Savage station. Longstreet, A. P[1 more...]
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