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Narragansett Bay (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
e Piscataqua had not been peopled by Puritans; and the system of Massachusetts could not properly be applied to the new acquisitions. In September, the general court adopted the measure which justice recommended; neither the freemen nor the deputies of New Hampshire were required to be church members. Thus political harmony was maintained, though the settlements long retained marks of the difference of their origin. The attempt to gain possession of the territory on Chap. X.} 1642 Narragansett Bay was less deserving of success. Massachusetts proceeded with the decision of an independent state. Samuel Gorton, a wild but benevolent enthusiast, who used to say, heaven was not a place, there was no heaven but in the hearts of good men, no hell but in the mind, had created disturbances in the district of Warwick. A minority of the inhabitants, wearied with harassing disputes, requested the interference of the 1641 magistrates of Massachusetts, III. Mass. Hist. Coll. i. 2—4. W
Roxbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
lth-work, Jesse Glover, a worthy minister, able in estate, and of a liberal spirit, in that same year embarked for Boston with fonts of letters for Chap. X.} printing, and a printer. He died on the passage; but in 1639, Stephen Daye, the printer, printed the Freeman's Oath, and an Almanac calculated for New England; and in 1640, for the edification and comfort of the saints, the Psalms,—faithfully but rudely translated in metre from the Hebrew by Thomas Welde and John Eliot, ministers of Roxbury, assisted by Richard Mather, minister of Dorchester,—were published in a volume of three hundred octavo pages, the first ever printed in America, north of the Gulf of Mexico. In temporal affairs, plenty prevailed throughout the settlements, and affluence came in the train of industry. The natural exports of the country were furs and lumber; grain was carried to the West Indies; fish also was a staple. The art of shipbuilding was introduced with the first emigrants for Salem; but Winthr
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 14
n New England, compared with Europe, was doubled; and the human race was so vigorous, that of all who were born into the world, more than two in ten, full four in nineteen, attained the age of seventy. Of those who lived beyond ninety, the proportion, as compared with European tables of longevity, was still more remarkable. I have dwelt the longer on the character of the early Puritans of New England, for they are the parents of one third the whole white population of the Chap. X.} United States. Within the first fifteen years,—and there was never afterwards any considerable increase from England,—we have seen that there came over twenty-one thousand two hundred persons, or four thousand families. Their descendants are now not far from four millions. Each family has multiplied on the average to one thousand souls. To New York and Ohio, where they constitute half the population, they have carried the Puritan system of free schools; and their example is spreading it through th
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ed too serious an obstacle. The grant for Massachusetts, it was argued, was surreptitiously obtaine interference of the 1641 magistrates of Massachusetts, III. Mass. Hist. Coll. i. 2—4. Winthation was refused; for, in that case, said Massachusetts, all would have come to nothing. The vi they had, at Plymouth, with the advice of Massachusetts, executed three of their own men for takin Winslow's New England's Salamander, 24. Massachusetts was not without steadfast friends in the lnow that royalty was abolished, it invited Massachusetts to receive a new patent, and to hold courty to sustain the doctrine of persecution. Massachusetts was already in the state of transition, ans of extreme cruelty. The government of Massachusetts at length resolved 1658 to follow the advy the guns of the fort. The government of Massachusetts applied similar quarantine rules to the mo long and frequent sermons. The courts of Massachusetts respected in practice the code of Moses; t[48 more...]
Milton, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
r, the great- 1635 to 1637 ness of the fines which avarice rivaled bigotry in imposing, the rigorous proceedings with regard to ceremonies, the suspending and silencing of multitudes of ministers, still continued; and men were enforced by heaps to desert their native country. Nothing but the wide ocean, and the savage deserts of America, could hide and shelter them from the fury of the bishops. Rushworth, II. 410. Hazard, i. 420. Neal's Puritans. Nugent's Hampden. The words are from Milton, the Puritan poet; the greatest poet of our language. The pillory had become the bloody scene of human agony and mutilation, as an ordinary punishment; and Chap. X.} the friends of Laud jested on the sufferings which were to cure the obduracy of fanatics. The very genius of that nation of people, said Wentworth, leads them always to oppose, both civilly and ecclesiastically, all that ever authority ordains for them. They were provoked to the indiscretion of a complaint, and then involved
Accomack (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
re prompted by another cause. The members of the Grand Council of Plymouth, long re- 635. duced to a state of inactivity, prevented by the se to frame the necessary plan; but time was wanting; the agents of Plymouth could not be seasonably summoned, and the subject was deferred. Tmpowered to frame and definitively conclude a union, the colony of Plymouth now set the example of requiring that the act of their constituentbecause it would not consent to form a part of the jurisdiction of Plymouth. Hazard. II. 99, 100. Yet this early confederacy survived the jrder had ever been severely punished by the Puritans: they had, at Plymouth, with the advice of Massachusetts, executed three of their own menolonies, he possessed influence in England. The movement began in Plymouth, by a proposition for a full and free tolerance of religion to all library. The infant institution was a favorite; Connecticut, and Plymouth, and the towns in the East, Folsom's Saco and Biddeford, 108. o
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
he whole heaven. When we are gone, our posterity and children after us shall read, in our town-records, your loving-kindness to us, and our real endeavor after peace and righteousness. Far different were the early destinies of the Province of Maine. A general court was held at Saco, 1640 June 25. under the auspices of the Lord Proprietary, who had drawn upon paper a stately scheme of government, with deputies and counsellors, a marshal and a treasurer of the public revenue, chancellors, aitants of the towns of York, Kittery, Wells, Saco, and 1656 Cape Porpoise, yet not a majority, remonstrated on the ground of former experience. To sever them from Massachusetts would be to them the subverting of all civil order. Documents in Maine Hist Coll. 296. 299. Ms. Letter of Geo. Folsom. Thus did Massachusetts, following the most favorable interpretation of its charter, extend its frontier to the islands in Casco Bay. It was equally successful in maintaining its independence o
Kittery (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
t to menaces and armed force, gave in its adhesion. Great care was observed to guard the rights of property; every man was confirmed in his possessions; the religious liberty of the Episcopalians was left unharmed; the privileges of citizenship were extended to all inhabitants; and the whole eastern country gradually, yet reluctantly, submitted to the necessity of the change. When the claims of the proprietaries in England were urged before Cromwell, many inhabitants of the towns of York, Kittery, Wells, Saco, and 1656 Cape Porpoise, yet not a majority, remonstrated on the ground of former experience. To sever them from Massachusetts would be to them the subverting of all civil order. Documents in Maine Hist Coll. 296. 299. Ms. Letter of Geo. Folsom. Thus did Massachusetts, following the most favorable interpretation of its charter, extend its frontier to the islands in Casco Bay. It was equally successful in maintaining its independence of the Long Parliament; though the
Biddeford (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
1636 the general court voted a sum, equal to a year's rate of the whole colony, towards the erection of a college In 1638, John Harvard, who arrived in the Bay only to fall a victim to the most wasting disease of the climate, desiring to connect himself imperishably with the happiness of his adopted country, bequeathed to the college one half of his estate and all his library. The infant institution was a favorite; Connecticut, and Plymouth, and the towns in the East, Folsom's Saco and Biddeford, 108. often contributed little offerings to promote its success; the gift of the rent of a ferry was a proof of the care of the state; 1645 and once, at least, every family in each of the colonies gave to the college at Cambridge twelve pence, or a peck of corn, or its value in unadulterated wampumpeag; Pierce's Harvard College. Winthrop, II. 214, 216. Everett's Yale address, 3. while the magistrates and wealthier men were profuse in their liberality. The college, in return, exerted
Jamaica, L. I. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ple of New England were ever sure that Cromwell would listen to their requests, and would take an interest in all the little details of their condition. He left them independence, and favored their trade. When his arms had made the conquest of Jamaica, he offered them 1655. the island, with the promise of all the wealth which the tropical clime pours prodigally into the lap of industry. and though they frequently thwarted his views, they never forfeited his regard. English history must jud followed of course. When persecution ceased in England, there were already in New England thousands who would not change their place for any other in the world; and they were tempted in vain with invitations to the Bahama Isles, to Ireland, to Jamaica, to Trinidad. The purity of morals completes the picture of colonial felicity. As Ireland will not brook venomous beasts, so will not that land vile livers. One might dwell there from year to year, and not see a drunkard, or hear an oath, or
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