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South River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
e premises occupied in 1903 by Mr. F. E. Chandler. Mr. Paul Curtis' yard was on the corner of South and Winthrop streets; he launched directly across the roadway. He built and occupied the large 02, by Britten.—J. A. Jr. Street bridge, then not in existence. His home was at the corner of South street and Maple avenue, and until a few years ago was occupied by his daughter. Mr. Peter Lee, which, with two others, furnished all the water used by families living between the river and South and Swan streets. The next nearest sources of water supply were the town pump in the square and washing was often brought from the Middlesex Canal and from the distillery. On the corner of South and Main streets was the Watts Turner place. He was the grandfather of the Tufts family who occ replaced by cheaper structures, many of which are still in existence. The Tufts lot, corner of South and Main streets, remained vacant for many years. Finally, the Central Engine House was built t
Greenville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
or the South, the 5th began to be disheartened; but on November 16 they were ordered to march, and took the cars to Greenville, S. C., one step nearer Cuba. Orders to go forward and a visit from the paymaster made November 14 a gala day. The troops were reviewed at Greenville by the mayor, and marched through the town with the band playing Dixie. Captain Clark had preceded the company, and tent floors and cook houses were ready for its advent. Thanksgiving dinner was sent by the Woman's Re wrote home, The fashion of dying has ceased to be, and all are on the mend. On the 31st the 5th was mustered out at Greenville, but the men came home in a body and passed in review before Gov. Wolcott at the State House. Capt. Clark brought bin the battle of Guanica. Sergts. Garrett E. Barry and Amos D. Haskell went to the Philippines after their return from Greenville, and both have been commended for gallant service there. They are still in United States service in the islands. Af
Essex County (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
s inventory lists first his real estate, then after the two slaves, Pompey and Abraham, peculiarly personal property, is mentioned one watch, £ 35. After this minute examination of the homes, possible only through the exactness of the old appraisers, we must conclude without doubt that time-pieces were rare in Medford in the early decades of 1700, and that the appearance of a clock, seen in the possession of these two orphans, was an event to be noted and remembered. The records of Essex County confirm this result as to the scarcity of time-pieces, for in the three years from December, 1699, to December, 1702, there were one hundred eleven inventories filed, and in but four of them is there mention of a clock or watch, and to three of these the epithet old is attached, indicating that they were probably out of repair and useless. The records of Suffolk County for 1699-1700 show seventy-two inventories, in but eight of which clocks or watches are mentioned. The question may
me other regiments camped even within a mile of them, was due to their obedience to orders regarding sanitation. Col. Whitney's experience in the Civil War made him especially careful in this respect. While we pity those who suffered so keenly, we must applaud those who, by keeping a model camp, preserved their health. Three members of the Light Guard, Messrs. Hall, Humphreys, and Cushing, enlisted in Co. A, 6th Regiment, and went to Porto Rico, where they participated in the battle of Guanica. Sergts. Garrett E. Barry and Amos D. Haskell went to the Philippines after their return from Greenville, and both have been commended for gallant service there. They are still in United States service in the islands. After the Spanish War, the Light Guard established a temporary armory at No. 9 High street, while the new armory, a memorial to Daniel Lawrence, was being constructed. Three years have gone by since the close of the war. New men have taken the places of many of those who
Susquehanna (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
train pulled slowly down. The band played The Girl I Left Behind Me as the boys boarded the cars, and as they threw themselves into their seats, there were many set faces among them, for they knew not when they would see Medford again. To the strains of Auld Lang Syne, the train moved out. The regiment remained at South Framingham until September, and put in hard work at drilling and camp duty. September 12 found our boys marching through coal dust to Camp Meade, on the banks of the Susquehanna. The camp was in a beautiful situation on a side hill sloping down to the river. Although in a malarial district, the men were, thanks to careful policing, kept in good health. Every other day the regiment was marched to the river for bathing, until a swimming pool was constructed nearer the camp. The splendid physical condition of the command before it left Massachusetts was in its favor. Whatever the criticisms of the hospitals at Camp Meade may have been, few members of E Co. ha
Noddle's Island (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ed twice in England, and married a third wife, Mary——, after coming to New England, his second wife having died on the passage over. Four of his sons came to this country. He died on his farm in Charlestown, May 21, 1654; his widow died at Noddle's Island, now East Boston, in 1676. II. George Blanchard had two wives and ten children; lived on one-half of the farm inherited from his father, and died there March 18, 1700, aged 84. His gravestone is in the Medford burying ground. III. JEast Boston, in 1676. II. George Blanchard had two wives and ten children; lived on one-half of the farm inherited from his father, and died there March 18, 1700, aged 84. His gravestone is in the Medford burying ground. III. Joseph Blanchard, eldest son of George Blanchard, by his first wife, was born in 1654; married Hannah, daughter of Thomas Shepard of Charlestown, April 13, 1681. He had seven children, and died in Charlestown, on the Blanchard Farm, October 24, 1694, aged 40. His gravestone is in the Medford burying ground. IV. Aaron Blanchard, twin son of Joseph and Hannah (Shepard), was born March 4, 1690; married Sarah——; had twelve children; died at Medford, September 30, 1769 (?) V. Aaron Blancha
Braintree (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ere cured before they developed into anything serious. All through the campaign he kept his promise made to the townspeople, I will look after the health of your boys. In October, 1st Lieut. Neilson was promoted to take command of Co. K, of Braintree; 2d Lieut. Whitney was promoted to his place. As section after section of those camped at Middletown left for the South, the 5th began to be disheartened; but on November 16 they were ordered to march, and took the cars to Greenville, S. C.th and Main streets, remained vacant for many years. Finally, the Central Engine House was built there. Ancestry of Aaron Blanchard, periwig-maker. I. Thomas Blanchard, the emigrant, came from Hampshire, England, in 1639. He lived in Braintree, Mass., from 1646 to 1651. In February, 1651, he bought of Rev. John Wilson, Jr., pastor of the church in Dorchester, a house and farm of two hundred acres in Charlestown, lying on the north side of Mystic river, and between Malden river on the ea
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
commanding told Capt. Goodale he had no criticism to make. In 1883, Capt. Goodale resigned, and for a few months Harry J. Newhall commanded, but was succeeded by Joseph E. Clark, formerly lieutenant in Co. H, of Charlestown. Under Capt. Goodale, and during the first term of Capt. Clark, the Light Guard held the front rank for drill and discipline. It was known as the crack company of the 5th Regiment. The company attended the ceremonies of unveiling the Washington Monument at Washington, D. C., February 22, 1885. It was the only militia company from Massachusetts in the city. It received commendation from the President and Gen. Sheridan, also from Gov. Robinson of Massachusetts, who expressed his pride at the way it represented the State. The first indoor prize drill occurred in 1885. The company gave a gold medal, the veterans two silver ones. The organization supported a drum and fife corps at this time. After another period of depression Capt. T. C. Henderson
South Hadley (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
l posted in all branches of his trade; a great reader of the Bible and mechanical papers. Early in the fifties he married Eliza Sawtell of Medford, who died about twelve years ago, since which time he has lived alone in the same house they occupied at her death. They had no children. He was buried from the Unitarian Church, Sunday, December 21, 1902. Mrs. Fanny Russell Leary. Mrs. Fanny Russell Leary died November 24, 1902, at her temporary home in Hartford, Ct. She was born in South Hadley, August 16, 1838, and was a descendant of Rev. John Russell, one of the earliest settlers of that town. In her death we realize the loss of a patriotic, loyal-hearted woman, who was interested in the past and present of Medford. Almost from its beginning she was one of the most devoted members of the Medford Historical Society. Notes. At the January meeting of the society, Hon. C. H. Porter, of Quincy, gave an address, entitled The 39th Massachusetts Regiment in the Civil War.
Framingham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
lay-time, for the weather was wet and stormy, and the regiment was exercised in war-time drills. A sharp but unrewarded watch was kept for the Spanish fleet. Orders were received that on the last day of June the Light Guard was to march to South Framingham and be mustered into the United States service. On the evening of June 29, the Opera House was packed to suffocation. Ex-commander George L. Goodale presided. Mayor Lewis H. Lovering made the opening address. Members of the City Governmboys boarded the cars, and as they threw themselves into their seats, there were many set faces among them, for they knew not when they would see Medford again. To the strains of Auld Lang Syne, the train moved out. The regiment remained at South Framingham until September, and put in hard work at drilling and camp duty. September 12 found our boys marching through coal dust to Camp Meade, on the banks of the Susquehanna. The camp was in a beautiful situation on a side hill sloping down to
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