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Oneida (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 1
er scale. The fine effect of the four hundred guns fired, was doubled by the rapidity of the fire. One hundred guns in six minutes is pretty good for four pieces and a citizen company. The Union is gone; we have buried it out of our sight, and fired cannon over its grave. Let its tomb be marked with the simple inscription: Hic Jacet--The Past. The South Carolina Secretary of State. Col. C. G. Memminger, the Secretary of State in the South Carolina Cabinet, is a German, born at Wirtemberg, Jan. 7, 1803. He was brought to this country when a child, and at the age of nine years, both parents having died, he became an inmate of the Orphan Asylum at Charleston. He was adopted into the family of Governor Thomas Bennett, by whom he was educated in the South Carolina College, graduating in 1820. He commenced the practice of the law in Charleston in 1825. During the nullification conflict of 1832-40, he was a leader of the Union party, and author of "The Book of Nullification" -
Fort Caswell (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
The National crisis. seizure of Another Fort in North Carolina--a Sunday at the batteries — Military dress of the South Carolinians — rejoicing in Georgia--Hon. Sherrard Clemens' speech, &c., &c. Seizure of Another Fort in North Carolina. It has already been stated that Governor Ellis, of North Carolina, had directed Forts Caswell and Johnson, which had been seized by citizens of that State, to be returned into the custody of the Federal Government.--This fact does not seem to have ended the seizures. A correspondent of the Petersburg Express, writing from Washington, N. C., on the 21st, says: The citizens of our town were much aroused yesterday morning on hearing of the seizure of Fort Neil, near our place. On Saturday night, a number of our enterprising young men left this place to seize Fort Neil, which they did, and hoisted the Palmetto flag over it. Fort Neil is a small, but strong little fort, lying on Pamlico river, between this place and Pamlico Soun
Pamlico (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
eral Government.--This fact does not seem to have ended the seizures. A correspondent of the Petersburg Express, writing from Washington, N. C., on the 21st, says: The citizens of our town were much aroused yesterday morning on hearing of the seizure of Fort Neil, near our place. On Saturday night, a number of our enterprising young men left this place to seize Fort Neil, which they did, and hoisted the Palmetto flag over it. Fort Neil is a small, but strong little fort, lying on Pamlico river, between this place and Pamlico Sound. While I write great excitement exists in Washington. A Sunday at the batteries. A correspondent of the Charleston Mercury, writing from the batteries at Morris' Island, thus describes a Sunday: On Sunday, January 29th, (as has been his custom since the commencement of our struggle,) the Chaplain went down to Fort Morris to preach to his company, the Washington Light Infantry. Reaching their quarters about half-past 3 P. M., he was
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
The National crisis. seizure of Another Fort in North Carolina--a Sunday at the batteries — Military dress of the South Carolinians — rejoicing in Georgia--Hon. Sherrard Clemens' speech, &c., &c. Seizure of Another Fort in North CaroliNorth Carolina. It has already been stated that Governor Ellis, of North Carolina, had directed Forts Caswell and Johnson, which had been seized by citizens of that State, to be returned into the custody of the Federal Government.--This fact does not seem toNorth Carolina, had directed Forts Caswell and Johnson, which had been seized by citizens of that State, to be returned into the custody of the Federal Government.--This fact does not seem to have ended the seizures. A correspondent of the Petersburg Express, writing from Washington, N. C., on the 21st, says: The citizens of our town were much aroused yesterday morning on hearing of the seizure of Fort Neil, near our place. On Saxture of cloth from which the clothing is made. Grey is the predominant color. The cloth is manufactured chiefly in North Carolina and Georgia, while some of it is imported from England direct. The material is generally serviceable and warm, and,
Pamlico Sound (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
eem to have ended the seizures. A correspondent of the Petersburg Express, writing from Washington, N. C., on the 21st, says: The citizens of our town were much aroused yesterday morning on hearing of the seizure of Fort Neil, near our place. On Saturday night, a number of our enterprising young men left this place to seize Fort Neil, which they did, and hoisted the Palmetto flag over it. Fort Neil is a small, but strong little fort, lying on Pamlico river, between this place and Pamlico Sound. While I write great excitement exists in Washington. A Sunday at the batteries. A correspondent of the Charleston Mercury, writing from the batteries at Morris' Island, thus describes a Sunday: On Sunday, January 29th, (as has been his custom since the commencement of our struggle,) the Chaplain went down to Fort Morris to preach to his company, the Washington Light Infantry. Reaching their quarters about half-past 3 P. M., he was warmly greeted by them. In a short ti
Washington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
tteries — Military dress of the South Carolinians — rejoicing in Georgia--Hon. Sherrard Clemens' speech, &c., &c. Seizure of Another Fort in North Carolina. It has already been stated that Governor Ellis, of North Carolina, had directed Forts Caswell and Johnson, which had been seized by citizens of that State, to be returned into the custody of the Federal Government.--This fact does not seem to have ended the seizures. A correspondent of the Petersburg Express, writing from Washington, N. C., on the 21st, says: The citizens of our town were much aroused yesterday morning on hearing of the seizure of Fort Neil, near our place. On Saturday night, a number of our enterprising young men left this place to seize Fort Neil, which they did, and hoisted the Palmetto flag over it. Fort Neil is a small, but strong little fort, lying on Pamlico river, between this place and Pamlico Sound. While I write great excitement exists in Washington. A Sunday at the batteries.
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
ighly respectable Kentuckian direct from Vicksburg, that the object of the batteries erected at that point by the State authorities of Mississippi is to obtain possession of the steamer Silver Wave, from Pittsburg, upon which it was said that United States ordnance was to be transported to the South; and probably to prevent the passage of Federal troops. The same informant says that three of the military companies of Mississippi were in charge of the battery, and they withdrew it from the shore on Tuesday last and seized the United States Hospital, which they are now occupying. Washington dispatches. An affecting parting took place to-day between the President and Senator Fitzpatrick. The former said: "Governor, the current of events warns me that we shall never meet again on this side the grave. I have tried to do my duty to both sections, and have displeased both. I feel isolated in the world." Mr. Buchanan had an interview with some old personal friends from Penn
Fort Morris (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 1
il, which they did, and hoisted the Palmetto flag over it. Fort Neil is a small, but strong little fort, lying on Pamlico river, between this place and Pamlico Sound. While I write great excitement exists in Washington. A Sunday at the batteries. A correspondent of the Charleston Mercury, writing from the batteries at Morris' Island, thus describes a Sunday: On Sunday, January 29th, (as has been his custom since the commencement of our struggle,) the Chaplain went down to Fort Morris to preach to his company, the Washington Light Infantry. Reaching their quarters about half-past 3 P. M., he was warmly greeted by them. In a short time the piazza of the house, and some of the rooms, were cleared, a rough pulpit arranged for the minister, and an invitation sent to the Carolina Light Infantry and Citadel Cadets, whose camps were near, to unite in worship, (the other companies were too remote--two or three miles,) which was promptly responded to by those companies and th
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
city, and are intended for the State of Florida. W. Hampton Gibbes, late Second lieutenant in the army of South Carolina, has resigned. Rejoicings in Georgia. The signing of the Ordinance of Secession of Georgia was celebrated in Augusta, Monday night. The Constitutionalist says: Broad street, between the markets, was radiant with light, and transparencies, varying with the taste of their enthusiastic projectors, lent variety to the beautiful scene. Nearly every pane of g fronts of stores or private residences was illuminated, and the myriads of star-like tapers produced a soft, golden light, possessing an attraction peculiarly its own. The streets were alive with such a crowd as we had no idea could be found in Augusta, and, as far as we could see, up and down our wide, beautiful, business street, extended the ebbing and flowing tide of humanity. Just such a crowd will not perhaps be seen again in this generation; for the blacks, in blessed ignorance that all
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
n this city, and are intended for the State of Florida. W. Hampton Gibbes, late Second lieutenant in the army of South Carolina, has resigned. Rejoicings in Georgia. The signing of the Ordinance of Secession of Georgia was celebrated , and fired cannon over its grave. Let its tomb be marked with the simple inscription: Hic Jacet--The Past. The South Carolina Secretary of State. Col. C. G. Memminger, the Secretary of State in the South Carolina Cabinet, is a German, bornSouth Carolina Cabinet, is a German, born at Wirtemberg, Jan. 7, 1803. He was brought to this country when a child, and at the age of nine years, both parents having died, he became an inmate of the Orphan Asylum at Charleston. He was adopted into the family of Governor Thomas Bennett, by g the advocates of the doctrine of nullification in biblical style. He has filled various offices of public trust in South Carolina, up to this time. For nearly twenty years he was at the head of the Finance Committee of the Lower House of the Legi
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