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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II..

Found 43,395 total hits in 9,535 results.

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Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
triumph. Unable to resist this rapidly augmenting force, Waite had no alternative but to ratify the surrender, dispatching, by permission, messengers to the frontier posts, to apprise the other commanders that they were included in its terms. Collecting and dispatching his men as rapidly as he might, he had some 1,200 encamped at Indianola ready for embarkation, when they were visited by Col. E. Van Dorn, of the Confederate service, recently a captain in our army, who had been sent from Montgomery with authority to offer increased rank and pay to all who would take service with the Rebels. His mission was a confessed failure. A few of the higher officers had participated in Twiggs's treason; but no more of these, and no private soldiers, could be cajoled or bribed into deserting the flag of their country. Col. Waite was still at San Antonio, when news reached Indianola April 17, 1861. of the reduction April 13. of Fort Sumter; and Col. Van Dorn, with three armed steamers
Pala (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
e of Valverde heroism and death of McRae fight at Apache Pass Rebels occupy Santa Fe they abandon New Mexico. The frontiers of Texas, Mexican and savage, were lly accepted a furlough, suggested by Loring, and quickly repaired under it to Santa Fe, the Headquarters of the department, making a revelation of Crittenden's treaces encountered, March 24. at Cañon Glorietta, or Apache Pass, 15 miles from Santa Fe, near Fort Union, a new Federal force of 1,300, composed partly of regulars, b g before, Slough took 57 prisoners, with a loss of only 15. Sibley entered Santa Fe in triumph soon afterward, meeting no further resistance. He collected there ies had been ordered to meet him, leaving his sick and wounded in hospitals at Santa Fe, Albuquerque, and Socorro, to fare as they might. He naively reports that sufcross those desolate mountains, in the rear of the flying foe, but returned to Santa Fe, whence his order, of even date May 4, 1862. with Sibley's official report,
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
and rigorous, was promptly responded to by an almost unanimous repeal of the entire act, leaving the statute-book of New Mexico clean of all complicity with the chattelizing of man. Meantime, Col. Canby was quietly proceeding with the organization of his militia and other forces for the inevitable contest, crippled throughout by the want of money, munitions, and supplies of all kinds. Even directions and orders, so plentifully bestowed on most subordinates, were not vouchsafed him from Washington, where the absorption of all energies in the more immediate and momentous struggle on the Potomac and the Missouri, denied him even an answer to his frequent and importunate requisitions and representations. An urgent appeal, however, to the Governor of the adjacent Territory of Colorado, had procured him thence a regiment of volunteers, who, though falling far enough short of the efficiency of trained soldiers, were worth five to ten times their number of his New Mexican levies. Making
Galveston (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
authority to offer increased rank and pay to all who would take service with the Rebels. His mission was a confessed failure. A few of the higher officers had participated in Twiggs's treason; but no more of these, and no private soldiers, could be cajoled or bribed into deserting the flag of their country. Col. Waite was still at San Antonio, when news reached Indianola April 17, 1861. of the reduction April 13. of Fort Sumter; and Col. Van Dorn, with three armed steamers from Galveston, arrived with instructions from Montgomery to capture and hold as prisoners of war all Federal soldiers and officers remaining in Texas. Maj. Sibley, in command at that port, had chartered two small schooners and embarked thereon a part of his force, when he was compelled to surrender again unconditionally. Col. Waite was in like manner captured at San Antonio, by order of Maj. Macklin, late an officer in our service, under Twiggs; Capt. Wilcox, who made the arrest, answering Waite's prot
San Antonio (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
d by detachments of from 50 to 150 of the regular army. San Antonio, 150 miles inland from Indianola, on Matagorda Bay, was gs was dispatched by Secretary Floyd from New Orleans to San Antonio, and assigned to the command of the department, it was d as this would be the last. the entire force at and near San Antonio, with all their arms, munitions, and supplies, to three duty of raising that force and posting it in and around San Antonio, so as to give countenance to the demand for capitulatioen sent down to supersede Twiggs in his command, reached San Antonio the morning after the capitulation, when all the materiang the flag of their country. Col. Waite was still at San Antonio, when news reached Indianola April 17, 1861. of the ronditionally. Col. Waite was in like manner captured at San Antonio, by order of Maj. Macklin, late an officer in our servics of the golden circle, having its Texas Headquarters at San Antonio, and its castles or affiliated lodges in every part of t
Fort Bliss (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
o 150 of the regular army. San Antonio, 150 miles inland from Indianola, on Matagorda Bay, was the headquarters of the department, whence the most remote post--Fort Bliss, on the usual route thence to New Mexico--was distant 675 miles. The whole number of regulars distributed throughout Texas was 2,612, comprising nearly half the far down as Fort Staunton, leaving Fort Fillmore still in the hands of the Texans. Gen. Sibley, who had hoped to advance in the Autumn of 1861, was still at Fort Bliss, within the limits of Texas, on the 1st of January, 1862; but moved forward, a few days thereafter, with 2,300 men, many of them trained to efficiency in the Me that his soldiers would decidedly object to returning to that inhospitable, undesirable country. These and kindred considerations had induced his return to Fort Bliss, Texas, and now impelled him to meditate a movement without orders still further down the country. Col. Canby wisely declined to run a race of starvation across
Paraje (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
izing Slavery Canby in command prepares to hold New Mexico Sibley brigade Fort Craig Sibley declines to attack battle of Valverde heroism and death of McRae fe notice to Capt. Hatch, commanding at Albuquerque, to Capt. Morris, who held Fort Craig, and other loyal officers, of the treachery of their superiors, and the duty duction had nearly ceased. Two insignificant collisions had taken place near Fort Craig. In October, 1861. In the earlier, a company of New Mexican volunteers, Caut slowly, by way of Fort Thorn, he found Feb. 19, 1862. Canby in force at Fort Craig, which he confronted about the middle of February. A careful reconnoissance ong them Capt. Rossel, of the regulars, captured while crossing the river. Fort Craig was still invulnerable; though a flag of truce, dispatched by Canby as he reareat by forced marches to Albuquerque, his depot, which Canby, advancing from Fort Craig, was seriously threatening. He reached it in time to save his supplies, but
Red River (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
regulars their loyalty and sufferings New Mexico repeals act legalizing Slavery Canby in command prepares to hold New Mexico Sibley brigade Fort Craig Sibley declines to attack battle of Valverde heroism and death of McRae fight at Apache Pass Rebels occupy Santa Fe they abandon New Mexico. The frontiers of Texas, Mexican and savage, were guarded, prior to the outbreak of Secession, by a line of forts or military posts stretching from Brownsville, opposite Matamoras, to the Red River. These forts were located at average distances of one hundred miles, and were severally held by detachments of from 50 to 150 of the regular army. San Antonio, 150 miles inland from Indianola, on Matagorda Bay, was the headquarters of the department, whence the most remote post--Fort Bliss, on the usual route thence to New Mexico--was distant 675 miles. The whole number of regulars distributed throughout Texas was 2,612, comprising nearly half the effective force of our little army. W
Matagorda Bay (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ism and death of McRae fight at Apache Pass Rebels occupy Santa Fe they abandon New Mexico. The frontiers of Texas, Mexican and savage, were guarded, prior to the outbreak of Secession, by a line of forts or military posts stretching from Brownsville, opposite Matamoras, to the Red River. These forts were located at average distances of one hundred miles, and were severally held by detachments of from 50 to 150 of the regular army. San Antonio, 150 miles inland from Indianola, on Matagorda Bay, was the headquarters of the department, whence the most remote post--Fort Bliss, on the usual route thence to New Mexico--was distant 675 miles. The whole number of regulars distributed throughout Texas was 2,612, comprising nearly half the effective force of our little army. When, soon after Mr. Lincoln's election, but months prior to his inauguration, Gen. David E. Twiggs was dispatched by Secretary Floyd from New Orleans to San Antonio, and assigned to the command of the departmen
Cubero (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
uncil of war decided that an assault was not justifiable, but that they might now safely leave Canby to his meditations, and push on up the river into the heart of the Territory. They did so, as they anticipated, without further opposition from the force they had so signally beaten. Leaving their wounded at Socorro, 30 miles on the way, they advanced to Albuquerque, 50 miles further, which fell without resistance, and where their scanty stock of provisions was considerably replenished. At Cubero, 60 miles westward, they obtained more provisions and some ammunition. Still advancing on Santa Fe. the Confederates encountered, March 24. at Cañon Glorietta, or Apache Pass, 15 miles from Santa Fe, near Fort Union, a new Federal force of 1,300, composed partly of regulars, but mainly of green Colorado volulteers, the whole commanded by Col. John P. Slough. The Rebel force actually present, under Col. W. R. Scurry, Representative from Texas in the XXXIIId Congress. was decidedly inf
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