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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 9 9 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 7 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 6 6 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 4 4 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 2 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 2 2 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 2 2 Browse Search
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e losses of Franklin; ill-supplied and half-fed, Hood's army was compelled to rely upon the enemy's want of supplies driving him out. On the 15th of December he attacked our whole line, so furiously as to break it at every point. Hood's defeat was complete; he lost his whole artillery-over fifty pieces-most of his ordnance and many of his supply trains. In the dreadful retreat that followed, General Forrest's vigorous covering alone saved the remnant of that devoted army; and on the 23d of January, 1865-when he had brought them once more into temporary safety-General Hood issued a farewell order, stating that he was relieved at his own request. Gallant, frank and fearless even in adversity, he did not shirk the responsibility of the campaign; declaring, that disastrous and bitter as it had been, he had believed it best. So ended all real resistance in the South and West. The enemy had gained the back door to Richmond, had shattered its supports and had marched on to the rea
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.64 (search)
continued in the direction of Tupelo, at which place Cheatham's corps, the last in the line of march, went into camp on the 10th of.January, 1865. On the 13th of January I sent the following dispatch to the Secretary of War: I request to be relieved from the command of this army. Upon General Beauregard's arrival at Tupelo, on the 14th of January, I informed him of my application to be relieved from the command of the army. I again telegraphed the authorities in Richmond, stating that the campaigns to the Alabama line and into Tennessee were my own conception; that I alone was responsible; that I had striven hard to execute them in such manner as to bring victory to our people, and at the same time repeated my desire to be relieved. The President finally complied with my request, and I bade farewell to the Army of Tennessee on the 23d of January, 1865, after having served with it some-what in excess of eleven months, and having performed my duties to the utmost of my ability.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the James River. (search)
lads were floated off, and withdrew up the river. The Drewry and one of the torpedo launches were destroyed. The armor of the Virginia was penetrated. That night the Confederate squadron came down again with the intention of attacking the Onondaga, but retired after meeting with a warm reception from the batteries on the banks. From a brief narrative furnished to the editors by Chief Engineer Alexander Henderson, U. S. N., the following statement is condensed: At this time [January 23d, 1865] I was serving on board the Onondaga, which was lying at anchor some little distance below the obstructions in Trent's Reach. On the evening of the 23d I was preparing to lay torpedoes at the obstructions, in compliance with a suggestion made a short time before by General Grant. When the approach of the Confederate iron-clads was reported, I verified the report by going up in a picket launch, and signaled the fact to the Onondaga from the army signal tower on shore. During the rema
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 18: capture of Fort Fisher, Wilmington, and Goldsboroa.--Sherman's March through the Carolinas.--Stoneman's last raid. (search)
en, had ordered General Schofield from Tennessee to the coast of North Carolina, with the Twenty-third Corps. Schofield received the command January 14, 1865. while preparing to obey General Thomas's order to go into winter-quarters at Eastport, Mississippi. See page 429. He started the following day, in steamers, down the Tennessee River, and up the Ohio to Cincinnati, with his whole corps, artillery and horses, leaving his wagons behind, and thence by railroad to Washington City January 23, 1865. and Alexandria. There he was detained awhile by the frozen Potomac, but finally went in steamers to the coast of North Carolina, where he landed near Fort Fisher, with Cox's (Third) division, on the 9th of February. The remainder of the troops speedily followed (some going to New Berne), and swelled Terry's little army of eight thousand men to full twenty thousand. Terry was then also occupying Fort Caswell and Smithville, on the opposite side of the Cape Fear River. The Department
having no other aspiration than to promote the interests of my country, I again telegraphed the authorities in Richmond, stating that the campaigns to the Alabama line and into Tennessee were my own conception; that I alone was responsible; that I had striven hard to execute them in such manner as to bring victory to our people, and, at the same time, repeated my desire to be relieved. The President finally complied with my request, and I bid farewell to the Army of Tennessee on the 23d of January, 1865, after having served with it somewhat in excess of eleven months, and having performed my duties to the utmost of my ability. At the time I assumed command around Atlanta, a number of General Johnston's staff officers remained with me, among whom were Colonels Mason, Falconer and Harvie, Majors Henry and Clare, who, notwithstanding the extraordinary circumstances under which I had superseded their old commanding officer, ably discharged their various duties with zeal and strict fid
Appendix. General Hood's report. The operations of the Army of Tennessee.Richmond, Va., Feb. 15th, 1865. General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va. General:--I have the honor to submit the following Report of the operations of the Army of Tennessee, while commanded by me, from July 18th, 1864, to January 23d, 1865. The results of a campaign do not always show how the General in command has discharged his duty. Their enquiry should be not what he has done, but what he should have accomplished with the means under his control. To appreciate the operations of the Army of Tennessee, it is necessary to look at its history during the three months which preceded the day on which I was ordered to its command. To do this, it is necessary either to state in this report all the facts which illustrate the entire operations of the Army of Tennessee in the recent campaign, or to write a supplemental or accompanying report. I deem the former more appropriat
d East Tennessee utterly cleared of the enemy — Stoneman and Gillem returned quietly to Knoxville; while Burbridge led his force back through Cumberland gap into Kentucky. Gen. Thomas, in summing up the results of his campaign, states, that from Sept. 7, 1864, to Jan. 20, 1865, he had captured 1 Major-General, 7 Brigadiers, 16 Colonels, 14 Lt.-Colonels, 22 Majors, 212 Captains, 601 Lieutenants, 89 Surgeons and Chaplains, and 10,895 non-commissioned officers and privates: total, 11,857; beside 1,332 who had been exchanged. He had also received and administered the oath of submission and amnesty to 2,207 deserters from the Rebel service. He had captured 72 serviceable guns and 3,079 infantry small arms. Our total loss during this campaign amounted, in killed, wounded, and missing, to about 10,000; which was less than half that of the enemy. In fact, the Rebel army had almost ceased to exist when Gen. Hood--then at Tupelo, Miss.--was relieved at his own request, Jan. 23, 1865.
arted with but four days rations, were constrained to hasten their return. No considerable loss was suffered, nor (otherwise than in destroying the railroad) inflicted. The withdrawal of most of our naval force from the James, to participate in the operations against Wilmington, tempted the authorities in Richmond again to try their luck upon the water. Their three ironclads — the Virginia, Fredericksburg, and Richmond — with five wooden steamers, and three torpedo-boats, dropped Jan. 23, 1865. silently down from the city under cover of darkness, passing Fort Brady at midnight, responding to its fire, and dismounting a 100-pounder in its battery; then passing out of its range, and breaking the chain in front of the obstructions placed in the channel by Gen. Butler at the lower end of Dutch gap, so that the Fredericksburg passed through; while the Richmond, Virginia, and Drewry, attempting to follow, grounded: the last-named, being immovable, was abandoned by her crew at day-li
I have suffered more from thus acting on my judgment than from any other act of my life, I rejoice — I trust modestly — with exceeding joy that I had sufficient firmness to do as I did do. Weitzel had no profession but arms, and his disobedience of orders would have ruined him in that profession. That we foresaw the result when we acted, and that I endeavored to repair for Weitzel as much as I could the consequences of his act, will appear from the letters between us:-- Willard's, Jan. 23, 1865. Maj.-Gen. G. Weitzel: My Dear Weitzel:--I am afraid you have been annoyed lest I might possibly think that your advice at Fort Fisher was not such as I ought to have acted upon. Let me assure you that I have never in any moment, amid the delightful stream of obloquy which is pouring upon me, doubted the military sagacity of the advice you gave, or the propriety of my action under it. Indeed, my friend, I am glad I was there to act as a shield to a young officer in a moment of fearfu
rom the Military Committee, to whom it had been referred, with an amendment inserting the word brevet before major-general. The amendment was agreed to; the joint resolution as amended passed; the Senate concurred in the amendment, and it was approved by the President on the twenty-fourth of January, 1865. No. Lxxvii.--The Joint Resolution to present the Thanks of Congress to Major-General Philip H. Sheridan, and the Officers and Men under his Command. In the House, on the twenty-third of January, 1865, Mr. Washburne, of Illinois, introduced a joint resolution tendering the thanks of Congress to Major-General Sheridan, his officers and men, which was read twice, and referred to the Committee on Military Affairs. On the twenty-fifth, Mr. Deming, of Connecticut, reported it back with an amendment in the nature of a substitute. The substitute declared: That the thanks of Congress be tendered to Major-General Philip H. Sheridan and the officers and men under his command, for the g
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