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James Russell Lowell, Among my books 16 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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97. a Parody — after Leigh Hunt. by Upson Downs. Jefferson Davis (may his tribe decrease!) Awoke one night with ague in his knees; Seeing within the moonlight of his room A female form, resplendent as the moon; Columbia, writing in a book of gold. Exceeding brass had made the Davis bold, And to the presence in the room he said: “What writest thou?” The vision raised its head, And with a look all dignity and calm, Answered: “The names of those who love our Uncle Sam.” “And is mine one?” said Davis. “Nay, not so,” Replied Columbia. Davis spake more low, But clearly still, and said: “I pray thee, then, Write me the names of those who hate their fellowmen.” Columbia wrote and vanished. The next night She came again, with her new list all right, And showed the names humanity detest, And lo! Jeff Davis' n
t, 235 B. C. Tradition long reported that the hights of the Caucasus, reaching from the Caspian to the Euxine, were occupied by the armies of Iskender (Alexander), the dread Doolkarnein or Two-Horned, so called from his being the conqueror of East and West. The illusion was said to have been caused by enormous trumpets, placed on the marvelous series of ramparts known in fable as the Wall of Gog and Magog, and craftily disposed so as to sound when the wind blew in certain directions. See Leigh Hunt's poem, The trumpets of Doolkarnein It is claimed by the modern school that the great horn, described in an old manuscript in the Vatican Library as having been used by Alexander the Great to assemble his army, at a distance of 100 stadia or 8 Italian miles, was not really a speaking-trumpet, as it is not expressly stated that he spoke through it. We prefer the tradition as it stands, for Alexander was well acquainted with Egypt, and the blast of trumpets was not unknown there. Morla
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 2: a Keats manuscript (search)
Chapter 2: a Keats manuscript Touch it, said Leigh Hunt when he showed Bayard Taylor a lock of brown silky hair, and you will have touched Milton's self. The magic of the lock of hair is akin to that recognized by nomadic and untamed races in anything that has been worn close to the person of a great or fortunate being. Mr. Leland, much reverenced by the gypsies, whose language he speaks and whose lore he knows better than they know it, had a knife about his person which was supposed by them to secure the granting of any request if held in the hand. When he gave it away, it was like the transfer of fairy power to the happy recipient. The same lucky spell is attributed to a piece from the bride's garter, in Normandy, or to pins filched from her dress, in Sussex. For those more cultivated, the charm of this transmitted personality is best embodied in autographs, and the more unstudied and unpremeditated the better. In the case of a poet, nothing can be compared with the inte
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 9: a literary club and its organ. (search)
o a crisis by the existence of an English periodical, which was at the time thought so good as to be almost a model for the American enterprise; but which seems, on rereading it in the perspective of forty years, to be quite unworthy of the comparison. There was in England a man named John A. Heraud, author of a Life of Savonarola, and described in one of Carlyle's most deliciously humorous sketches as a loquacious, scribacious little man of middle age, of parboiled greasy aspect, and by Leigh Hunt, as wavering in the most astonishing manner between being Something and being Nothing. He seems to have been, if not witty himself, the cause of wit in others, for Stuart Mill said of him: I forgive him freely for interpreting the Universe, now when I find he cannot pronounce the h's. When Carlyle once quoted to him the saying of Novalis, that the highest problem of authorship is the writing of a Bible,-- That is precisely what I am doing, answered the aspiring, unaspirating. Carly
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Index. (search)
150; other references, 3 22, 34, 44, 45, 62, 141-144, 146. 162, 188. Heine, Heinrich, 17, 45, 298. Heraud, John A., 145-147, 160, 161, 229; his magazine, 140, 145, 160. Herschel, F. W., 45. Higginsons, The, 52. Hoar, Elizabeth, letters from, 64, 119; other references, 8, 248, 249. Holmes, John, 24. Holmes, O. W., 24, 26, 80 84, 86. Hooper, Ellen (Sturgis), 154, 166. Houghton, Lord (R. M. Milnes), 69. Howe, Julia (Ward), 2. Howitts, the, 229. Hudson, H. N., 211. Hunt, Leigh, 146. Hutchinson Family, the, 176. I. Indians, study of the, 196. Ireland, Mr., 221. Irish, defense of the, 214. Irving, Washington, 181, 132. J. Jacobs Sarah S., 80, 84. Jahn, F. L., 46. James, Henry, 134. Jameson, Anna, 195. Jefferson, Thomas, 4, 16, 45, 308. Jonson, Ben, 69, 134. K. Kant, Immanuel, 45, 282, 288. Kinney, Mr., letter from, 247. Kittredge, Rev. Mr., 63. Knapp, J. J., 39. Kneeland, Abner, 77. L. Lafarge, John, 134. Lafayette,
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: American political writing, 1760-1789 (search)
iderable volume. The Journal of the Continental Congress, published from time to time, with the exception of such parts as were thought to require secrecy, The material in the Secret journals, 4 vols., Boston, 1821, is included in the Ford and Hunt edition of the Journals (see Bibliography). is an invaluable record of proceedings, although it contains no report of debates. Numerous reports, resolutions, and other state papers of importance were, however, printed separately in broadside or pintenance of the Federal establishment. In May, 1787, the Federal Convention met at Philadelphia. In anticipation of its deliberations, Madison set down his opinion as to the Vices of the Political System of the United States, Writings, ed. Hunt, II, 361-369. and prepared a summary view Of Ancient and Modern Confederacies. Ibid., II, 369-390. The former noted most of the important points around which the debate later turned, but there is nothing in the Constitution to show that the latte
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: early essayists (search)
er for a moment tedious, is an evidence of uncommon powers, and even his weaknesses, his not infrequent soft spots, show that at least he was independent of the methods of eighteenth-century prose. In this respect Willis has been compared to Leigh Hunt, whom in several ways he certainly resembled, but he was not, like Hunt, an omnivorous reader. The social sense was stronger in him than literary instinct; the merits of his best work are the merits of lively chat. During his European wanderiHunt, an omnivorous reader. The social sense was stronger in him than literary instinct; the merits of his best work are the merits of lively chat. During his European wanderings he learned more from men than from books, and from women most of all. His Diotima was Lady Blessington, whose literary dinners and soirees were duly, in The New York Mirror, dashed at by his free pencil. At Gore House he heard gossip of Byron, saw D'Israeli in action, and met Rogers, Procter, Moore, and Bulwer, men of letters and men of the world. After such models Willis shaped his own career. He luxuriated in drawing-rooms and shone at dinners, The topmost bright bubble on the wave
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
330 Hopkins, Stephen, 127, 128 Hopkinson, Francis, 122, 167, 177, 215-216 Horace, 161 Horse-Shoe Robinson, 311 Houdetot, Countess de, 199 House of fame, 176 House of night, the, 181, 183 Howard, Martin, 128, 129 Howe, Julia Ward, 223 Howe, Lord, 91, 99 Howe, Sir, William, 145, 226 Hubbard, Rev., William, 25, 27, 28, 47 Hudibras, 112, 118, 171, 172, 173, 287 Hugo, Victor, 269 Humboldt, 187 Hume, 27, 29, 91, 97, 287 Humphreys, David, 164, 169, 174 Hunt, Leigh, 242 Hunter, Governor, Richard, 215 Hunter, William, 96 Hurlbert, W. H., 230 Hutchins, 190 Hutchinson, Anne, 28 Hutchinson, Thomas, 20, 28-30, 37 n.,99, 132, 133 Hutchinson Letters, 134 Hylas and Philonous, 58 Hymn of the sea, a, 277 I Idle man, the, 240 Iliad, 11, 12 Imlay, Gilbert, 191 In a forest, 263 n. Independent journal, 148 Independent Reflector, the, i 8, 121 Indian Burying ground, the, 183 Indian captivity, narratives of, 6-8 I
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter 2: the Worcester period (search)
I should think, but impulsive and vehement, and with a satire as fine as the edge of a lancet. Her sister is married now, and she lives alone with her flowers and her father. March 22, 1861 In Boston I was much interested in looking over Leigh Hunt's library which J. T. Fields bought and had for sale. It carried one nearer to a past era in English literature than anything else could do, to see his name and notes, all written in ink, in a delicate Italian hand and very abundant. Novembetable, and more entertaining than the bibliopole himself. Such treasures as that house is crammed with. Most of the books there described I saw and some not mentioned; as, for instance, a Greek book, marked in the title-page Percy Shelley and Leigh Hunt, in the latter's hand, but the blank leaves full of Shelley's notes in pencil-writing, delicate as himself. The Wordsworth volumes were captivating, with his own later alterations put in with ink in the neatest way, and showing the delicacy of
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 3: the Philadelphia period (search)
blished in London in 1800, and Charles Brockden Brown, the so-called Father of American fiction, of whom we shall presently speak. Reading these volumes now, one finds with surprise that they go beyond similar periodicals even at the present day, in the variety of sources whence their cultivation came. The Portfolio translates portions of Voltaire's Henriade; recognizes the fact that fresh intellectual activity has just begun in England; quotes early poems by Coleridge and Wordsworth and Leigh Hunt, sometimes without giving the names, showing the editors to have been attracted by the poems themselves apart from the author. There is no want of color in the criticism. German books are apt to be found rather abhorrent to the Philadelphia critic, which is not surprising when we remember that it was the age of Kotzebue, whose travels it burlesques and who drives the editor into this extraordinary outburst: The rage for German literature is one of the foolish and uncouth whims of the tim
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