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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 999 7 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 382 26 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 379 15 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 288 22 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 283 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 243 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 233 43 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 210 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 200 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 186 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 3, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Longstreet or search for Longstreet in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 2 document sections:

igade — from Ewell's left, in front of McLean's Ford, and along the stream to Longstreet's position. It was unchanged in organization, and was supported by Early's ba thicket of young pines, a short distance in the rear of McLean's Ford. Longstreet's brigade held its former ground at Blackburn's Ford, from Jones's left to Boyonets. Bonham's brigade, as before held Mitchell's Ford, its right near Longstreet's left, its left extending in the direction of Cocke's right. It was organiz movement, to be followed and supported successively by Generals D. R. Jones, Longstreet, and Bonham respectively, supported by their several appointed reserves. g exigency. The movement of the right and centre, already begun by Jones and Longstreet, was at once countermanded with the sanction of General Johnston, and we arrar, and with the sanction of General Johnston, Generals Ewell, Jones, (D. R.,) Longstreet, and Bonham, were directed to make a demonstration to their several fronts to
st under the illusion that it had weightier metal than its own to contend with. The centre brigades — Bonham's and Longstreet's — of the line of Bull Run, if not closely engaged, were nevertheless exposed for much of the day to an annoying, almoher in holding their post or taking up the pursuit officers and men discharged their duty with credit and promise. Longstreet's brigade, pursuant to orders, prescribing his part of the operations of the centre and right wing was thrown across Buhat place, when night and darkness intervening, Gen. Bonham thought it proper to direct his own brigade, and that of Gen. Longstreet, back to Bull Run. Gen. D. R. Jones early in the day crossed Bull Run with his brigade, pursuant to orders indignal services rendered by Colonel B. F. Terry and T. Lubbock, of Texas, who had attached themselves to the staff of General Longstreet. These gentlemen made daring and valuable reconnaissances of the enemy's positions, assisted by Captains Gorce and