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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 4 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 2 0 Browse Search
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n speaking of ages, no general world-wide area of contemporary progress is intended. There are tribes yet in the bone age (see axe), others in the bronze. Some of the bone men have jumped into the iron (which they purchase) because they had no copper, and iron was the first metal with which they became acquainted; such are some of the South Sea Islanders. Hesiod, 900 B. C., states that iron was discovered after copper and tin, and that those who were ancient, in his day, used bronze. Lucretius mentions also the gradation:— The primeval arms were the hands, the nails, and the teeth, Together with stones and branches, the fragments of the forests; Afterwards was found the power of iron and of bronze, But the use of bronze was known before that of iron. Bronze implements are obtained by casting, and, it is believed, by subsequent hammering while hot. (See supra.) Bronze and copper were cast in ancient Egypt; the Chinese state that Yu, who was semiking with a partner (Chun) on
hed in Venice, which long had a monopoly therein and attained great excellence. See p. 976. Theophrastus, the pupil and successor of Aristotle, notices the fitness of the sand at the mouth of the river Belus for the manufacture of glass. Lucretius termed it vilrum. Cicero mentions glass, linen, and paper as the common articles of Egyptian merchandise. Scaurus, 58 B. C., introduced it in the seena of his gorgeous theatre, which was divided into three tiers: the lower of marble, the ely wrought figures of opaque white enamel. So admirably is it made that it was long supposed to be a genuine sardonyx. Fictitious gems in glass were known in Rome, as were also mosaic glass, glass plates for paving, walllining, windows. Lucretius (95-51 B. C.) accounted as follows for the fact that sound would pass through some objects while images would not:— The voice can pass unbroken through winding pores of bodies, though images refuse to pass through them; for the letter are br
ly tracing the celebrated Latin epigram, Eripuit Coelo fulmen, sceptrumque tyrannis, which was inscribed. on the portrait of the great philosopher, to its origin. In this charming essay the writer's intimate acquaintance with the French literary and political history of that period appears to great advantage. The Latin verse, as Mr. Sumner clearly shows, was prepared by the celebrated statesman Turgot, who formed it from the line, Eripuit fulmenque Jovi, Phoeboque saggittas, of the Anti-Lucretius, by Cardinal Melchior de Polignac. The cardinal derived his idea from the Astronomicon, an ancient poem by M[arcus Manilius, where the verse appears under the following form, Eripuitque Jovi fulmen, viresque tonandi, which has been translated, Unsceptred Jove,--the Thunderer disarmed. From the critical acumen displayed in this article, it might be supposed that Mr. Sumner had spent his life as a bibliophile, amusing himself with antiquarian researches, and the amenities of literature.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: Bryant and the minor poets (search)
future which he believes in more than he visualizes, an act of his thinking rather than of his imagination; the earth itself as the sepulchre of man; and, like one great primeval landscape, the mountain, the sea, the wind, the river, the seasons, the plain, the forest that undergo small change from their reality, take on few subjective peculiarities, by virtue of an imagination that seems, as it were, to absorb rather than to create its objects,--in this more like the world of phenomena in Lucretius than, say, in Tennyson, or in the partially Lucretian Meredith, certainly than in Hugo, to whom nature becomes so often monstrous and grotesque. And yet Bryant's imagination has its characteristic modes of relating its objects. Three or four huge and impressive metaphors underlie a great part of his poetry: the past as a place, an underworld, The figure is in Kirke White's Time: Where are conceal'd the days which have elapsed? Hid in the mighty cavern of the past, They rise upon
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
Livingston, William, 118, 119, 121, 162 Locke, 57, 58, 66, 70 n., 81, 93, 116, 1 8, 329, 334 Locke Amsden, 310 Lockhart, 305 Logan, 309 Logan, C. A., 228 Logan, James, 189 Loiterer, the, 234 London chronicle, the, 129, 140 London magazine, the, 121 Long, Major S. H., 205, 210 Longfellow, 166, 212, 244, 261, 262, 273, 355 Looking Glass for the times, a, 151 Love in 1876, 226 Lowell, James Russell, 241, 244, 249, 261, 268, 270, 276, 279, 282, 341, 344 Lucretius, 269 Lycidas, 274 Lyell, Sir, Charles, 186, 207 Lyon, Richard, 156 Lyrical ballads, 183, 262, 262 n. Lytton, Lord, 243 M McDonough, Thomas, 222 McFingal, 139, 171-173, 182 McKinnon, John D., 163 McLane, Louis, 250 MacDonald, W., 125 n., 130 n., 134 n., 141 n. Madison, 146, 148, 149, 170 Madoc, 212 Magnalia, 51 Malebranche, 58 Mallet, David, 215 Man at home, the, 290 Mandeville, Bernard, 91 Mandeville, 292 Manners of the times, the, 175 M
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 5: year after College.—September, 1830, to September, 1831.—Age, 19-20. (search)
to unprofitableness. I have indeed studied, or passed my eyes over books; but much of my time, and almost my whole mind, have been usurped by newspapers and politics. I have reached in anxiety for the latest reports from Washington, and watched the waters in their ebb and rise in different parts of the country. No more of this though. With Boston I shall leave all the little associations which turned aside my mind from its true course. In the way of classics, I wish to read Tacitus, Lucretius, Virgil, Ovid, Sallust, Cicero, Horace, Homer, Thucydides, and choice plays of the great tragedians. Do you start? I only say I wish to do it; but I mean to do it if impossibility is not written upon it. I wish also to reacquaint myself with political economy and intellectual philosophy. I find myself nonplussed daily in my own reflections by my ignorance of these subjects. . . . J. Q. Adams has written a letter on Masonry. I will send it to you as soon as I can lay my hands upon it
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
s, as they come mended by the mellifluous words of Plato; not in the resounding line of Homer, on whose inspiring tale of blood Alexander pillowed his head, not in the animated strain of Pindar, where virtue is pictured in the successful strife of an athlete at the Olympian games; not in the torrent of Demosthenes, dark with self-love and the spirit of vengeance; not in the fitful philosophy and boastful eloquence of Tully; not in the genial libertinism of Horace, or the stately atheism of Lucretius. To these we give admiration; but they cannot be our highest teachers. In none of these is the way of life. For eighteen hundred years the spirit of these classics has been in constant contention with the Sermon on the Mount, and with those two sublime commandments on which hang all the law and the prophets. The strife is still pending, and who shall say when it will end? Heathenism, which possessed itself of such Siren forms, is not yet exorcised. Even now it exerts a powerfull sway
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1854. (search)
ty of feeling or opinion. Sometimes, indeed, he would indulge himself in working off his superfluous activity by the defence of extravagant theses; but his sincere views were as profound as they were original. The full counsel of his mind he never opened probably to any one; but it can be said with certainty that his philosophy united elements which to a dry reasoner seem hardly capable of combination. Plato was his constant study and his most valued authority; he also often referred to Lucretius, whose writings he read carefully in college; and he was familiar with the thought of the English and American transcendentalists. He loved mysticism. His religious conceptions were far removed from those of the received theology; but they were the conceptions of one who, with personal insight, beholds the world of divine reality. The root of his life was in his spiritual consciousness; and in that consciousness he waited for the coming of a higher future with great-souled faith, which
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1862. (search)
ttle hand while he balanced himself with his other arm. There he stood joyous and triumphant. When Arthur was nearly nine years old, his father removed to Baltimore. Here he began his Latin Grammar, and was soon brought forward as the show scholar whenever visitors came to the school. At thirteen he entered the third class of the Boston Latin School, and under its excellent training his love for the classic languages increased. He spent much of his leisure time in reading Horace and Lucretius, and in writing Latin verses; and when in the second year of the school, gained for a Latin ode the prize which belonged to the first class. It was his way to adopt one or two pursuits, and to follow them with enthusiasm, while he cared little for any others. About this time he took a great interest in gymnastics, in which he was fitted to excel by a strong and compact frame and a fearless spirit. He graduated at the Latin School in 1857, taking another prize; and as his father though
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 5: (search)
was an instructor in the gymnasium there, and, while thus employed, attracted the attention of John Muller, the historian, who said of Thiersch and Dissen, who were then not twenty-five years old, that if the art of studying the Greek classics was lost, these two young men had knowledge enough to restore it. . . . . In the evening he took us to the house of a friend, Mr. Von Couta, a councillor of state; where we met a daughter of Herder, a cousin of Klopstock; Prof. Hand, the editor of Lucretius, a young man of thirty-five; and Myer, the archaeologist, now Goethe's intimate friend, an old man of sixty or seventy, short and fat, with very odd manners, but lively and amusing in conversation. October 28.—Prof. Riemer, who is second librarian of the Public Library, called on us and amused us above an hour, by describing Goethe's mode of living, peculiarities, etc.,—facts one cannot get in books, or from any source but the knowledge of an intimate acquaintance. Prof. Riemer lived n
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