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utterly, they should have left naming the field to us. It would have looked more modest. Johnston calls it the Battle of Chickahominy, from the river that runs across our front and to their rear. It was up this river that the celebrated Captain John Smith sailed when captured by, Indians in early days. These banks were the hunting-grounds of pretty Pocahontas who saved his life. The story would read better had Smith married the poor lass. Well, said another, the locality is forever faSmith married the poor lass. Well, said another, the locality is forever famous, but I see that McClellan, as usual, claims it as a victory. You were not foolish enough to suppose he would commence telling the truth at this stage of proceedings? It is true he is the best man they have, but when the North, displeased with Scott's defeat, were beating about for a successor, had not McClellan fed the national vanity by sending flaming sensation despatches about his defeat of Pegram at Rich Mountain, Western Virginia, they would never have given him a thought; for
June, 1861. June, 22 Arrived at Bellaire at 3 P. M. There is trouble in the neighborhood of Grafton. Have been ordered to that place. The Third is now on the Virginia side, and will in a few minutes take the cars. June, 23 Reached Grafton at 1 P. M. All avowed secessionists have run away; but there are, doubtless, many persons here still who sympathize with the enemy, and who secretly inform him of all our movements. June, 24 Colonel Marrow and I dined with Colonel Smith, member of the Virginia Legislature. He professes to be a Union man, but his sympathies are evidently with the South. He feels that the South is wrong, but does not relish the idea of Ohio troops coming upon Virginia soil to fight Virginians. The Union sentiment here is said to be strengthening daily. June, 26 Arrived at Clarksburg about midnight, and remained on the cars until morning. We are now encamped on a hillside, and for the first time my bed is made in my own tent. Cla
she became very angry, so angry indeed that she cried. The other little girls laughed heartily, and called her Pudin‘ also, and then asked my name. I answered John Smith; they insisted then that Pudin‘ was my wife, and called her Pudin‘ Smith. This made Pudin‘ furious, and she abused her companions and me terribly; but John SmiSmith. This made Pudin‘ furious, and she abused her companions and me terribly; but John Smith invested a little money in cherries, and thus pacified Pudin‘, and so got to Louisville without getting his hair pulled. I saw no more of Pudin‘ until she got off the cars at Elizabethtown. Going up to her, we shook hands, and I said, Good-by, Pudin‘. She hung her head for a moment, and tried to look angry, but finally breakJohn Smith invested a little money in cherries, and thus pacified Pudin‘, and so got to Louisville without getting his hair pulled. I saw no more of Pudin‘ until she got off the cars at Elizabethtown. Going up to her, we shook hands, and I said, Good-by, Pudin‘. She hung her head for a moment, and tried to look angry, but finally breaking into a laugh she said, I do n't like you at all any way, good-by. June, 27 Reached Huntsville. The regiment in good condition, boys well; weather hot. General Buell arrived last night. McCook's Division is here; Nelson, Crittenden, and Wood
very large majority of them wished to send the most of their pay home to their families or their friends for safe keeping. Of course there was some risk attending the sending of it in the mails. To obviate this risk an allotment plan was adopted by means of which when the troops were visited by the paymaster, on signing a roll prepared for that purpose, so much of their pay as they wished was allotted or assigned by the soldiers to whomsoever they designated at the North. To illustrate: John Smith had four months pay due him at the rate of $13 a month. He decided to allot $10 per month of this to his wife at Plymouth, Mass.; so the paymaster pays him $12, and the remaining $40 is paid to his wife by check in Plymouth, without any further action on the part of John. This plan was a great convenience to both the soldiers and their families. In this division of his income the calculation of the soldier was to save out enough for himself to pay all incidental expenses of camp lif
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 14: the Richmond campaign. (search)
to instructions, bound them both to secrecy touching his journey. Having held the desired interview with the Commander-in-Chief, he returned the next day to the line of march pursued by his troops, and led them, the evening of June 25th to the village of Ashland, twelve miles north of Richmond. To understand the subsequent narrative, the reader must have a brief explanation of the position of the two great armies. The Chickahominy River, famous for the adventures and capture of Captain John Smith, in the childhood of Virginia, is a sluggish stream of fifteen yards width, which flows parallel to the James, and only five miles north of Richmond. It is bordered by extensive meadows, which degenerate in many places into marshes, and its bed is miry and treacherous; so that it constitutes an obstacle to the passage of armies far more formidable than its insignificant width would indicate. During this year, especially, the excessive rains and repeated freshets had converted its li
ey H. grinned all the way across his fresh, fair face, as he extended a foot protruding from what had been a boot. D-1 take your dress! Peel those onions, Charley! cried a baldheaded man from the fire--Don't your heart rise at the scent of this olla, my boy? Don't it bring back our dinners at the Spanish legation? Stay and dine with us — if Charley ever has those onions done-and you'll feast like a lord-mayor! By the way, last letters from home tell me that Miss Belle's engaged to John Smith. You remember her that night at Mrs. R.'s fancy ball? Wouldn't mind having a bottle of Mrs. R.'s sherry now to tone up these onions, Charley said ruefully. It would go well With that stew, taken out of a tin cup-eh, cookey? We had lots better at the club, the cook said, thoughtfully stirring the mess on the fire-It was laid in before you were born, Charley. Those were days, boys-but we'll drink many a bottle of it yet under the stars and bars! That we will, old man! and I'll c
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 15 (search)
ovement against the Weldon Railroad Swapping horses Sheridan Returns where Pocahontas saved John Smith General James H. Wilson's raid the staff enlarged On June 21 Butler had thrown a pontoon-ant said: Mr. President, let us ride on and see the colored troops, who behaved so handsomely in Smith's attack on the works in front of Petersburg last week. Oh, yes, replied Mr. Lincoln; I want toont they came to the place where, according to tradition, Pocahontas had saved the life of Captain John Smith. Whether it was the exact spot or not, it was regarded in that locality as historic grounhief, he was rash enough to state, in reply to questions as to his identity, that his name was John Smith ; and that the noble red man thought he was trying to perpetrate a practical joke on him, and . He rode out to the Petersburg front with his staff, held interviews with Meade, Burnside, and Smith, and visited the lines to make a personal inspection of the principal batteries. He became impr
ur Williams.-New regiment created.-promotion.--Smith T. After the Black Hawk War closed in 1831 ber, because of a threat which was made that John Smith T. John Smith T. was a noted duellist, hadJohn Smith T. was a noted duellist, had killed nine men outright. His unexpected presence at a little wayside tavern, where he was not recbrave and tried man related an anecdote of how Smith T.‘s name affected himself at the inn at Galenompany were sitting on the gallery, talking of Smith T. after dinner, and he said he should like to A quiet little man arose and announced, I am Smith T., at your service. The man went to the bannk. Once General Dodge had a difficulty with Mr. Smith T., and the two exchanged a promise to fight at sight. The general saw Smith T. first at a crossing as he turned the corner in Galena, and his pistol covered Smith T. before he saw the general. Smith T. bowed coolly and said, This time you Smith T. bowed coolly and said, This time you have the advantage of me, general, but the next! and passed on. The old Indian fighter was a match
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Cumberland Gap. (search)
od condition for active service. The organization on the 3d of July was as follows: Second Brigade, Col. James E. Rains: 4th Tenn., Col. J. A. McMurry; 11th Tenn., Col. J. E. Rains; 42d Ga., Col. R. J. Henderson; 3d Ga. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. M. A. Stovall; 29th N. C., Col. R. B. Vance; Ga. Battery, Capt. J. G. Yeiser. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. S. M. Barton; 30th Ala., Col. C. M. Shelley; 31st Ala., Col. D. R. Hundley; 40th Ga., Col. A. Johnson; 52d Ga., Col. W. Boyd; 9th Ga. Battalion, Maj. J. T. Smith; Va. Battery, Capt. Joseph W. Anderson. Fourth Brigade, Col. A. W. Reynolds: 20th Ala., Col. I. W. Garrott; 36th Ga., Col. J. A. Glenn; 39th Ga., Col. J. T. McConnell; 43d Ga., Col. S. Harris; 39th N. C., Col. D. Coleman; 3d Md. Battery, Capt. H. B. Latrobe. Fifth Brigade, Col. T. H. Taylor: 23d Ala., Col. F. K. Beck; 46th Ala., Col. M. L. Woods; 3d Tenn., Col. J. C. Vaughn; 31st Tenn., Col. W. M. Bradford; 59th Tenn., Col. J. B. Cooke; Tenn. (Rhett) Battery, Capt. W. H. Burroughs.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Opposing forces in the Chattanooga campaign. November 23d-27th, 1863. (search)
2th and 47th Tenn., Col. W. M. Watkins; 13th and 154th Tenn., Lieut.-Col. R. W. Pitman; 29th Tenn., Col. Horace Rice. Artillery Battalion, Maj. A. R. Courtney: Ala. Battery, Capt. James Garrity; Dent's Battery, Capt. S. H. Dent; Tex. Battery, Capt. J. P. Douglas. Division loss: k, 76; w, 476; m, 1124==1676. Breckinridge's division, Brig.-Gen. William B. Bate. Bate's Brigade, Col. R. C. Tyler (w), Col. A. F. Rudler (w), Lieut.-Col. James J. Turner: 37th Ga., Col. A. F. Rudler, Lieut.-Col. J. T. Smith; 10th Tenn., Maj. John O'Neill; 15th and 37th Tenn., Lieut.-Col. R. D. Frayser; 20th Tenn., Capt. John F. Guthrie; 30th Tenn., Lieut.-Col. James J. Turner; Caswell's Battalion, Lieut. Joel Towers. Lewis's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Joseph H. Lewis: 2d Ky., Col. James W. Moss; 4th Ky., Lieut.-Col. T. W. Thompson; 5th Ky., Col. H. Hawkins; 6th Ky., Lieut.-Col. W. L. Clarke; 9th Ky., Lieut.-Col. John C. Wickliffe. Finley's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Jesse J. Finley: 1st and 3d Fla., Lieut.-Col. E. M
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