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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 13.95 (search)
t Engineer Charles L. Steever, Otsego; Samuel Higgins, first-class fireman, Picket-boat; Richard Hamilton, coal-heaver, Shamrock; William Smith, ordinary seaman, Chicopee; Bernard Harley, ordinary seaman, Chicopee; Edward J. Houghton, ordinary seaman, Chicopee; Lorenzo Deming, landsman, Picket-boat; Henry Wilkes, landsman, Picket-Chicopee; Edward J. Houghton, ordinary seaman, Chicopee; Lorenzo Deming, landsman, Picket-boat; Henry Wilkes, landsman, Picket-boat; Robert H. King, landsman, Picket-boat. Cushing and Howarth, together with those designated as attached to the Picket-boat, were the original seven who brought the boat down from New York. Cushing and Houghton escaped, Woodman and Higgins were drowned, and the remaining eleven were captured. For his exploit Lieutenant CuChicopee; Lorenzo Deming, landsman, Picket-boat; Henry Wilkes, landsman, Picket-boat; Robert H. King, landsman, Picket-boat. Cushing and Howarth, together with those designated as attached to the Picket-boat, were the original seven who brought the boat down from New York. Cushing and Houghton escaped, Woodman and Higgins were drowned, and the remaining eleven were captured. For his exploit Lieutenant Cushing received the congratulations of the Navy Department, and also the thanks of Congress, and was promoted to the grade of lieutenant-commander. The Albemarle was afterward raised, towed to Norfolk, and in 1867 there stripped and sold. Editors. Lieutenant Cushing reached the Valley City about midnight on the night of Octo
ames'sFoster & TaylorBramhall & HoweBoston400 333 Sch.Jane HowesSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorG. BowleyProvincetown110 334 BarkZamoraSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorWilliam A. ReaBoston273 335 Sch.Emily HilliardSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorJohn DunlapProvincetown101 336 BrigPlanetSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorJ. HilliardBoston142 337 ShipEmperorSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorWilliam HammondMarblehead600 338 Sch.LowellSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorElihu ReedBoston130 339 BrigChicopeeSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorJ. H. PearsonBoston200 340 BarkLaconiaSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorJ. H. PearsonBoston200 341 ShipCorsairJ. Stetson'sJ. StetsonWheeler & AdamsBoston325 342 ShipFaneuil HallJ. Stetson'sJ. StetsonGeorge Thatcher and othersBoston578 343 BarkMaylandP. Curtis'sP. CurtisSamuel DavisBoston203 344 ShipSunbeamP. Curtis'sP. CurtisA. HemenwayBoston850 345 BarkHelen MariaP. Curtis'sP. CurtisR. TaylorChatham203 346 Sch.FawnGeo. H. Briggs'sGeorge H. Briggs
ress, fatigue dress, a properly equipped charger, an orderly, sentry, cavalry sabres and the short cavalry carbine. Except for the absence of revolvers, it is an epitome of the dress and equipment which the Federal Government supplied lavishly to its troopers during the latter half of the war. At the outset, the volunteer cavalrymen were required to supply their own horses, a proper allowance being made for food and maintenance. In 1861, the Confederate cavalry had no Colt's revolvers, no Chicopee sabers, and no carbines that were worth carrying. Their arms were of the homeliest type and of infinite variety. This photograph was taken in July, 1865, when Washington no longer needed watching. war. The Western cavalry used the ‘41 Tactics until late in the year 1864, and thereafter a system of drill formulated by General Philip St. George Cooke, which was published in 1862 by the War Department and prescribed a single-rank formation for the cavalry. After all the months of drill,
and little interviewed warriors that composed the Confederate cavalry. They did important service in the West. Under Forrest and Wheeler they helped Bragg to defeat Rosecrans at Chickamauga, and their swift raids were a constant menace to the Union supplies. This photograph was probably taken late in the war, as up to the third year the Confederate troopers could not boast equipments even so complete as shown in this photograph. In 1861 the Confederate cavalry had no Colt revolvers, no Chicopee sabers, and no carbines that were worth carrying. Their arms were of the homeliest type and of infinite variety. At the battle of Brandy Station, in 1863, every man was armed with at least one, and sometimes several, Army and Navy revolvers and excellent sabers. The civilian saddles had given place to McClellans, and that man was conspicuous who could not boast a complete outfit of saddle, bridle, blankets — woolen and rubber — and arms, all taken from the generous foe. The Confederate c
olive branch frankly and cordially displayed in one hand, offering every reasonable opportunity to avoid the dreadful alternative of a civil war with our own countrymen. But, if war must come, all sound policy and even humanity requires that it be vigorously sustained, and that we show ourselves capable of maintaining the honor, dignity, and safety of our country. General Devereux had three sons officers in the war, one of whom was brevetted a general. April 16.—General Nettleton, of Chicopee, writes, I hereby tender to His Excellency the Governor, and through him to the President, my personal services to any appointed post in the gift of either. I cannot, by reason of age, be admitted to the ranks by enlistment; yet I am hearty and hale, and not older than my grandsire was when following the lead of Washington. General Nettleton's son raised a company for the Thirtieth Regiment, of which he went out captain, and came home colonel of the regiment. April 17.—Edward Kinsley,
re presented of James W. White, and eighty others of Grafton, and of the commissioned officers of the Twelfth Regiment of Infantry (Colonel Webster), severally for an act to legalize the appropriations of cities and towns in behalf of the volunteer militia, and for other purposes. Referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. May 15. In the Senate.—Petition of Robert Morris and seventy-one others, for a law authorizing colored men to form military companies; of John Wells and others, of Chicopee, for a law to allow cities and towns to raise money for the support of volunteers and their families. On motion of Mr. Carter, of Hampden, a joint committee was appointed to consider the expediency of tendering the service of members of the Legislature free of expense. Mr. Stone, of Essex, reported a bill regulating drill companies, also in favor of the bill for the establishment of a home guard. On motion of Mr. Boynton, of Worcester, it was voted, that the joint special committee o
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
$989.42; in 1863, $797.39; in 1864, $1,942.26; in 1865, $1,089.92. Total amount, $5,142.19. Chicopee Incorporated April 29, 1848. Population in 1860, 7,261; in 1865, 7,581. Valuation in 1860, behalf of the town, to look after the welfare of those who have gone or may go to the war from Chicopee, to promote their comfort when sick or wounded, to aid them in returning home when disabled, topropriated to pay the same. A vote identical with this was passed on the 26th of December. Chicopee, according to a return made by the selectmen in 1866, furnished six hundred and eighty men for the war, which we believe to be one hundred less than the number actually furnished, as Chicopee filled its quota on every call made by the President, and at the end of the war had a surplus of forty-0,800.00; in 1865, $8,500.00. Total amount, $41,084.08. The Ladies' Soldiers' Aid Society of Chicopee was organized early in the war, of which Mrs. James T. Ames was president during the whole time
Bolton 613 Boston 582 Boxborough 377 Boxford 180 Boylston 616 Bradford 182 Braintree 483 Brewster 31 Bridgewater 538 Brighton 378 Brimfield 298 Brookfield 616 Brookline 485 Buckland 267 Burlington 381 C. Cambridge 382 Canton 490 Carlisle 391 Carver 540 Charlestown 393 Charlemont 259 Charlton 618 Chatham 33 Chelmsford 399 Chelsea 591 Cheshire 66 Chester 299 Chesterfield 334 Chicopee 300 Chilmark 164 Clarksburg 68 Clinton 619 Cohasset 491 Colerain 260 Concord 401 Conway 261 Cummington 335 D. Dalton 69 Dana 621 Danvers 184 Dartmouth 124 Dedham 493 Deerfield 262 Dennis 35 Dighton 125 Dorchester 497 Douglas 622 Dover 500 Dracut 402 Dudley 624 Dunstable 404 Duxbury 542 E. East Bridgewater 543 Eastham 37 Easthampton 336 Easton 127 Edgartown 166 Egremont 7
lliam H.,20Weymouth, Ma.July 31, 1861Feb. 15, 1864, re-enlistment. Goodwin, William H.,22Boston, Ma.Feb. 16, 1864Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Glover, Edward W.,26Malden, Ma.July 31, 1861Oct. .., 1862, disability. Grover, Fitzroy,19Chicopee, Ma.Aug. 31, 1864June 11, 1865, expiration of service. Haggerty, John,26Pittsfield, Ma.Jan. 18, 1864Deserted, never joined Battery. Hall, Arthur W.,18Heath, Ma.Aug. 30, 1864June 11, 1865, expiration of service. Hale, Russell,19Gardner, Ma.July Boston, Ma.July 31, 1861Jan. 5, 1864, re-enlistment. Jaunotte, Abraham,26Hadley, Ma.Jan. 25, 1864Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Jeffords, George R.,40Rowe, Ma.Aug. 30, 1864June 11, 1865, expiration of service. Jennings, Stephen E.,29Chicopee, Ma.July 31, 1864Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Julian, George N.,20Exeter, N. H.,July 31, 1861Sept. 18, 1862, Capt. 18th N. H. Vols. Kelly, Robert N.,23Boston, Ma.Dec. 19, 1863Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Kelly, Thomas,28Bos
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
kindly to Madame Mittermaier and to all your family. I shall not forget my pleasant days at Heidelberg, and the hospitality of your house. Believe me ever, my dear Mr. Mittermaier, Very sincerely yours, Charles Sumner. To Longfellow he wrote, Aug. 20, 1842:— I have been away on a short journey with my two sisters, Mary and Julia, and have enjoyed not a little their enjoyment of life and new scenes. Howe started in company. We went to Springfield; thence made an excursion to Chicopee; thence to Lenox and Stockbridge, where I left the girls to ramble about, while Howe and I started on a journey to New York, including Hell Gate, where we passed the chief of our time. The Three Graces were bland and lovely. From New York I hastened back to Lenox; thence to Lebanon, where I fell in with President Van Buren; thence to Saratoga, where I saw Miss Sedgwick, Mrs. C——, and Miss A——L——; thence to Catskill and the Falls, which I admired very much, West Point, New York, and
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