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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 29, 1862., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 9, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 3 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 13, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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lace at Savannah, Tenn., between a detachment of Union cavalry and a rebel picket-guard, resulting in the defeat of the rebels, with a loss of five killed and sixty-five wounded.--Chicago Tribune, April 19. This day a fight occurred on Wilmington Island, N. C., between a reconnoitring and surveying party of National troops, and a superior force of rebels. A party consisting of about two hundred men, principally from the Eighth Michigan regiment, was despatched from the Federal headquarters, for the purpose of reconnoitring on Wilmington Island, and taking surveys and soundings. One of the companies was under command of Lieut. Wilson. The force landed in the morning from boats, and in the forenoon was surprised by a rebel force, numbering six to eight hundred men, who had come from their batteries on the mainland, with the apparent design of entirely cutting off the National force. The attack of the rebels was unexpected. They showered upon the Union troops an effective fi
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 9: operations of Admiral Dupont's squadron in the sounds of South Carolina. (search)
. R. P. Rodgers accompanied the expedition. The object of this move was to cut off the communication between Fort Pulaski and Savannah. The vessels entered Little Tybee River, or Freeborn Cut, and passed Fort Pulaski, but were not fired into, as the fort was not prepared for an enemy on this side. Preparations were at once made, however, to receive the expedition warmly on its return. The distance was that of long-range guns. The vessels were brought to a stop, after passing Wilmington Island, by heavy piles driven in a double row across the channel; they were anchored and a reconnoissance made, in boats, of the numerous creeks with which this country was intersected. At 5 P. M. five Confederate steamers, one of them carrying a square flag at the fore (probably Commodore Tatnall's), anchored at the mouth of the creek. They had it in their power to choose their distance, and this led to an expectation of an attack, but the night passed quietly. At 11:15 the five steam
e command of the corps, but on the 28th it was restored to General Wallace. In December, 1864, the First and Third Brigades of the First Division (Thoburn's) were transferred to the Army of the James, then near Richmond, and were designated as the Independent Division of the Twenty-fourth Corps, General J. W. Turner commanding. The Eighth Corps proper remained in service until August 1, 1865, when its existence terminated. Ninth Corps. Roanoke Island New Berne Camden Wilmington Island James Island Manassas Chantilly South Mountain Antietam Fredericksburg Siege of Vicksburg Jackson Blue Springs Lenoir Station Campbell's Station Fort Sanders Siege of Knoxville Strawberry Plains Wilderness Ny River Spotsylvania North Anna Bethesda Church Cold Harbor assault on Petersburg, June 17th Petersburg Trenches Petersburg Mine Weldon Railroad Poplar Spring Church Boydton Road Hatcher's Run Fort Stedman Fall of Petersburg. A wandering corps, whose
D 2 25 27   17 17 160   E   18 18   31 31 181   F 1 19 20   18 18 166   G   30 30 1 17 18 187   H 1 16 17   17 17 154   I 1 20 21   21 21 157   K   18 18   30 30 166 Totals 11 212 223 3 223 226 1,770 223 killed == 12.5 per cent. Total of killed and wounded, 783; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 26. battles. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. Coosaw River, S. C. 2 Wilderness, Va. 26 Port Royal Ferry, S. C. 3 Spotsylvania, Va. 17 Wilmington Island, Ga. 13 Shady Grove, Va. 2 James Island, S. C. 61 Bethesda Church, Va. 14 Manassas, Va. 8 Cold Harbor, Va. 2 Chantilly, Va. 12 Petersburg, Va., (assault, 1864) 13 South Mountain, Md. 1 Petersburg Mine, Va. 4 Antietam, Md. 5 Petersburg Trenches, Va. 15 Blue Springs, Tenn. 1 Weldon Railroad, Va. 8 Campbell's Station, Tenn. 2 Poplar Spring Church, Va. 3 Siege of Knoxville, Tenn. 2 Fall of Petersburg 5 On Picket, Dec. 9, 1864; Feb. 18, 1865 2 Place unknown
a rifle-gun, or one of heavy calibre. After coming up with and passing the high land on Wilmington Island, the further progress of the gunboats was arrested by a blockade of heavy piles driven in , from personal examinations, his conclusions as to the military seizure and occupation of Wilmington Island, to which Gen. Sherman and yourself had called my particular attention. At fifteen minu improved our knowledge of these obscure and intricate passages. We have ascertained that Wilmington Island is abandoned, not only by the enemy's troops, but even by its inhabitants; that this cut o without difficulty; but, on account of the width of the marsh opposite to the highland on Wilmington Island, that the channels of Savannah River cannot be advantageously commanded from this point atlly at low water; that gunboats could not lie in safety in any part of the narrows, unless Wilmington Island were occupied in force, on account of the advantages it possesses for constructing masked
dgers,) and a small detachment from company A, corps of engineers, under Sergeant James E. Wilson. Col. Terry and Lieut.-Col. Hall entered most zealously upon the discharge of their varied duties. A detachment from Col. Rosa's regiment, under Capt. Hinkle, have occupied, since the twenty-second of February, an advanced and very exposed position on Lazaretto Creek, by which boat communication between Fort Pulaski and the interior was cut off. Several interesting reconnoissances of Wilmington Island were made by Capt. Hinkle, one of which, commanded by Col. Rosa, developed some useful information. Lieut. Horace Porter, of the Ordnance Department, has rendered signal, important and indispensable services. Besides discharging most faithfully the special duties of ordnance officer, he directed, in person, the transportation of the heaviest ordnance, and drilled and instructed the men in its use, laboring indefatigably day and night. He was actively engaged among the batteries du
Doc. 140.-skirmish at Wilmington Island, Ga. Lieutenant Wilson's report. on board steamer Honduras, off Wilmington Island, Ga., April 17, 1862. Lieut. W L. . M. Burger, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters United States Forces, Tybee Island, Ga.: sir: I have the honor to submit the following for the informWilmington Island, Ga., April 17, 1862. Lieut. W L. . M. Burger, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters United States Forces, Tybee Island, Ga.: sir: I have the honor to submit the following for the information of the General commanding: Escorted by seven companies of the Eighth Michigan volunteers, commanded by Col. Fenton, and a small detachment of the Rhode Island artillery, I embarked on the steamer Honduras, at Goat's Point, about eight o'clock yesterday morning, for the purpose of making a reconnoissance of Wilmington IslaWilmington Island. Proceeding through Lazaretto Creek, Tybee River, and Wilmington Narrows to Scriven's plantation, two companies, (G and B,) about one hundred and fifteen men, under the command of Capt. Pratt, were landed, with orders to march at once to the south-west end of the island, skirting Turner's Creek on the right, so as to cover th
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
1, 1862: Ft. Pulaski, Ga., siege and capture. Union, 6th and 7th Conn., 3d R. I., 46th and 48th N. Y., 8th Maine, 15th U. S. Inft., Crew of U. S. S. Wabash. Confed., 5 companies heavy art., commanded by Col. C. H. Olmstead. Losses: Union 1 killed. Confed. 4 wounded, 360 prisoners. April 14, 1862: Montevallo, Mo. Union, 2 cos. 1st Iowa Cav. Confed. No record found. Losses: Union 2 killed, 4 wounded. Confed. 22 captured. April 16, 1862: Whitemarsh or Wilmington Island, Ga. Union, 8th Mich., Battery of R. I. Light Artil. Confed., 13th Ga. Losses: Union 10 killed, 35 wounded. Confed. 4 killed, 15 wounded. April 16, 1862: Lee's Mills, Va. Union, 3d, 4th, and 6th Vt., 3d N. Y. Battery and Battery of 5th U. S. Artil. Confed., Gen. J. B. Magruder's The closing of Savannah, April 12, 1862 This terrific punishment was inflicted upon the nearest angle of the Fort by the thirty-six heavy rifled cannon and the mortars which the F
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Georgia, 1862 (search)
orld," and Launches from "Wabash." Jan. 28-Apr. 11: Operations against Fort PulaskiCONNECTICUT--6th and 7th Infantry. MAINE--8th Infantry. MICHIGAN--8th Infantry. NEW YORK--1st Engineers; 46th, 47th and 48th Infantry. RHODE ISLAND--3d Arty. Feb. 15: Action, Venus PointRHODE ISLAND--3d Arty (Detachment). March 13: Skirmish, Mattis PlantationPENNSYLVANIA--45th Infantry (Detachment). March 28: Reconn. near St. Augustine CreekNEW YORK--48th Infantry (Detachment). March 30-31: Affairs, Wilmington Island and Whitmarsh IslandNEW YORK--46th Infantry (Detachments). April 10-11: Bombardment and capture Fort PulaskiCONNECTICUT--6th and 7th Infantry. MAINE--8th Infantry. MICHIGAN--8th Infantry. NEW YORK--1st Engineers; 46th, 47th and 48th Infantry. RHODE ISLAND--3d Heavy Arty. Crew of U. S. S. "Wabash." Union loss, 1 killed. April 16: Skirmish, Wilmington and Whitmarsh IslandsMICHIGAN--8th Infantry. RHODE ISLAND--3d Heavy Arty. (Detachment.) Union loss, 10 killed, 35 wounded. Total, 45. M
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Rhode Island Volunteers. (search)
Dept. of the South, to January, 1865. District of Beaufort, 2nd Separate Brigade, Dept. of the South, and Dept. of South Carolina, to August, 1865. Service. Duty at Hilton Head, S. C., till January, 1863. Action at Whitmarsh and Wilmington Islands April 16, 1862. At Beaufort, S. C., till November, 1863. Moved to Morris Island, S. C., November 14-16, and operations against Charleston, S. C., from Morris and Folly Islands, till December, 1863. Moved to Hilton Head, S. C., and er, 1863. Morris Island, S. C., 10th Corps, Dept. of the South, to April, 1864. Morris Island, S. C., Northern District, Dept. of the South, to October, 1864. Service. Duty at Hilton Head, S. C., till May, 1862. Whitmarsh and Wilmington Islands April 16. Moved to Edisto Island, S. C., May 23. Operations on James Island, S. C., June 1-28. Action on James Island June 10. Battle of Secessionville June 16. Moved to Hilton Head, S. C., June 28-July 1, and duty there till
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