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Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 27, 1861., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 11, 1861., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 5, 1862., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 12 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, An Act for the corporation of Merchants adventurers for the discovering of new trades, made in the eight yeere of Queene Elizabeth. Anno 1566. (search)
ightie Prince Lord John Vasiliwich, Emperour of all Russia , Volodimersky, great duke of Musky, &c. who receivereeks and rivers of the said mighty Emperour of all Russia , and great duke of Mosco, &c. and all and singular o the said dominions of the saide mightie prince of Russia , &c. found out convenient way to saile into the saied into the dominions of the said mightie prince of Russia , &c. to the great detriment of this common wealth: r, chiefe governour or ruler of the said country of Russia for the time being, his heires or successors, nor tor within the dominion of the said mighty prince of Russia , or in any other of the places prohibited to be visheir merchandizes at the road of S. Nicholas bay in Russia , and doe not discharge their said merchandizes at sme other port or roade lying on that North coast of Russia , or other territorie nowe subject to the saide mightie prince of Russia , &c. hitherto by the subjects of this realme not commonly frequented, that then during th
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A very briefe remembrance of a voyage made by M. Anthony Jenkinson, from London to Moscovia, sent from the Queenes Majestie to the Emperour, in the yeere 1566. (search)
enes Majestie to the Emperour, in the yeere 1566. THE fourth day of May in the yere aforesaid, I imbarked my selfe at Gravesend in the good ship called the Harry of London, and having had a prosperous voyage arrived at the bay of S. Nicholas in Russia the 10. day of July following, and immediatly I sent in post to the Emperor to advertise of my comming, and traveiling then thorowe the countrey, I with my company came to the Mosco where the Emperour kept his court, the 23. of August, and foortust, and foorthwith gave the Secretarie to understand of my arrivall, who advertised the Emperours Majestie of it, and the first day of September, being a solemne feast among the Russes, I came before the Emperours Majestie, sitting in his seate of honour, and having kissed his hand and done the Queenes Majesties commendations, and delivered her Graces letters and present, he bad me to dinner, which I accepted, and had much honour done unto me both then and all the time of my abode in Russia .
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Priviledges graunted by the Emperour of Russia to the English merchants of that company: obteined the 22. of September, Anno 1567. by M. Anthony Jenkinson. (search)
Trinitie, and maker of all things, whom we worship in all things, and in all places, the doer and fulfiller of all things, which is the perfect knowledge giver of the true God, our Lorde Jesus Christ, with the comforter the holy Spirit, and thou which art the strengthener of our faith, keepe us together, & give us health to preserve our kingdome, thou giver of all good fruites, and helper of all Christian beleevers. We great lord by the grace of God, and great duke John Vasiliwich of all Russia , Volodimer, Mosco, Novogrod, Cazan, Astracan, Plesco, Smolensko, Tweria, Yougorie, Vadika, Bulgar, Sybier and others, Emperour and great duke of Novogrod of the lower land, of Chernygo, Rezan, Polotski, Rostove, Yereslave, Bealozera, Oudoria, Obdoria, Condensa, and lord of many other lands, and of all the North parts, commander and lord of Liffe-land. Whereas our sister Queene Elizabeth, by the grace of God, Queene of England, France and Ireland , hath written to us her letter
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter of M. Henrie Lane to M. Richard Hakluit, concerning the first ambassage to our most gracious Queene Elizabeth from the Russian Emperour anno 1567, and other notable matters incident to those places and times. (search)
es and times. WORSHIPFULL sir, because I finde you have the successe and proceedings of Osep Napea the first ambassadour of the Russian Emperour to the Majesties of King Philip and Queene Marie, at what time and at his returne I was remaining in Russia , & do not finde that the perfect knowledge of the first ambassage from thence to this our Sovereigne Ladie Queene Elizabeth is come to your hands, betweene whose Highnesse and the ambassadours I was interpretour, I thinke good to expresse it. rve: in which yere of 1566, having generall procuration and commission from the Company, I was in the Low countrey at Antwerpe and Amsterdam , and sometimes in company with Polacks, Danskers, and Easterlings: and by reason I had bene a lidger in Russia , I could the better reply and prove, that their owne nations and the Italians were most guiltie of the accusations written by the king of Poland. This king Sigismundus (whose ambassadours very sumptuous I have scene at Mosco) was reported to
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A copie of the priviledges granted by the right high and mightie Prince, the Emperour of Russia, &c. unto the right worshipfull fellowship of English merchants, for the discoverie of new trades : and hither sent by Thomas Randolfe esquire, her Majesties Ambassadour to the sayd Emperour, and by Andrew Savin his Ambassadour in the yere of our Lord God 1569. (search)
our people, in despight of our enemies, and to our fame with our friends. We John Vasiliwich by the grace of God, great lord, Emperour, and great duke of all Russia , Volodemer, Moscovia, Novogrod, Emperour of Cazan, Tversky, Vgorsky, Permisky, Vadsky, Bulgaria , and many others, lord and great duke of the Low countreys of Nov dominions, and thorow our countrey to Boghar, to Persia, Casbin, and Charday, and to all other countreys. 1 We John Vasiliwich Emperour and great duke of all Russia (for our sister Elizabeths sake, Queene of England´╝ë have given and granted to the English merchants, the Governours, Consuls, Assistants & felloship, sir Wil. Garthe great, Vopsko, the Narve, Vriagorod, or at any other townes, they to sel their wares there at their pleasure: And of all wares aswell of other countreis as of Russia , no officer or other to take any custome, neither in any place to stay them in any wise, neither take any kinde of toll of them for their wares whatsoever. 6
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A Commission given by us Thomas Randolfe Ambassadour for the Queenes Majestie in Russia , and Thomas Bannister, &c. unto James Bassendine, James Woodcocke and Richard Browne, the which Bassendine, Woodcocke, and Browne we appoint joyntly together, and aiders, the one of them to the other, in a voyage of discovery to be made (by the grace of God) by them, for searching of the sea, and border of the coast, from the river Pechora, to the Eastwards, as hereafter followeth Anno 1588. The first of August. (search)
A Commission given by us Thomas Randolfe Ambassadour for the Queenes Majestie in Russia , and Thomas Bannister, &c. unto James Bassendine, James Woodcocke and Richard Browne, the which Bassendine, Woodcocke, and Browne we appoint joyntly together, and aiders, the one of them to the other, in a voyage of discovery to be made (by th time of the yere will permit it, and that you doe thinke there will be sufficient time for you to returne backe with your barke to Winter either at Pechora or in Russia , at your discretion: for we refer the same to your good judgements, trusting that you will lose no time, that may further your knowledge in this voyage. Note you, it was the 20 of August, 56 yer the Serchthrift began to returne backe from her discoverie, to Winter in Russia , and then she came from the Island Vaigats, being forcibly driven from thence with an Easterly winde and yce, and so she came into the river Dwina, and arrived at Colmogro the 11 of September, 56. If the yce had
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Certaine letters in verse, written by Master George Turbervile out of Moscovia, which went as Secretarie thither with Master Tho. Randolph , her Majesties Ambassadour to the Emperour 1568, to certeine friends of his in London, describing the maners of the Countrey and people. (search)
l see the Dames abroade, that are of best aray. The Russie meanes to reape the profit of her pride, And so he I did meane to write to thee, To let thee weete in Russia land, what men and women bee. Hereafter I perhaps oin stead of pillow, clap his saddle to his head. In Russia other shift there is not to be had, For where the b points besides, which strange and geazon are. The Russie men are round of bodies, fully fac'd, The greatestearle, which they Rubasca call. Their shirts in Russie long, they worke them downe before, And on the sleetocks to keepe the colde away, Within his boots the Russie weares, the heeles they underlay With clouting clamt the toes, And over all a Shuba furd, and thus the Russie goes. Well butned is the Shube, according to his sthey use short stirrups for the warre : For when the Russie is pursued by cruel foe, He rides away, and suddenlthey skippe, But goe not forward on their way, the Russie hath his whippe To rappe him on the ribbes, for tho
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, To his especiall friend Master Edward Dancie. (search)
his eyes. I not a little muse, what madnesse makes them paint Their faces, waying how they keepe the stoove by meere constraint. For seldome when, unlesse on Church or marriage day A man shall see the Dames abroade, that are of best aray. The Russie meanes to reape the profit of her pride, And so he mewes her to be sure, she lye by no mans side. Thus much, friend Dancie, I did meane to write to thee, To let thee weete in Russia land, what men and women bee. Hereafter I perhaps of other thi Dames abroade, that are of best aray. The Russie meanes to reape the profit of her pride, And so he mewes her to be sure, she lye by no mans side. Thus much, friend Dancie, I did meane to write to thee, To let thee weete in Russia land, what men and women bee. Hereafter I perhaps of other things will write To thee, and other of my friends, which I shall see with sight : And other stuffe besides, which true report shall tell, Meane while I ende my loving lines, and bid thee now farewell.
ocke is nothing rich, the cost is very slight. The chiefest place is that, where hangs the god by it, The owner of the house himselfe doth never sit, Unlesse his better come, to whom he yealds the seat: The stranger bending to the god, the ground with brow must beat. And in that very place which they most sacred deeme, The stranger lies: a token that his guest he doth esteeme. Where he is wont to have a beares skinne for his bed, And must, in stead of pillow, clap his saddle to his head. In Russia other shift there is not to be had, For where the bedding is not good, the boalsters are but bad. I mused very much, what made them so to lie, Sith in their countrey Downe is rife, and feathers out of crie : Unlesse it be because the countrey is so hard, They feare by nicenesse of a bed their bodies would be mard, I wisht thee oft with us, save that I stood in feare Thou wouldst have loathed to have layd thy limmes upon a beare, As I and Stafford did, that was my mate in bed: And yet (we t
declare, And other private points besides, which strange and geazon are. The Russie men are round of bodies, fully fac'd, The greatest part with bellies bigge thest have collers set with pearle, which they Rubasca call. Their shirts in Russie long, they worke them downe before, And on the sleeves with coloured Silks, twto see. A paire of yarnen stocks to keepe the colde away, Within his boots the Russie weares, the heeles they underlay With clouting clamps of steele, sharpe pointed at the toes, And over all a Shuba furd, and thus the Russie goes. Well butned is the Shube, according to his state, Some Silke, of Silver other some: but those ofAnd broader be then ours, they use short stirrups for the warre : For when the Russie is pursued by cruel foe, He rides away, and suddenly betakes him to his boe, Aurre, once pricke them and they skippe, But goe not forward on their way, the Russie hath his whippe To rappe him on the ribbes, for though all booted bee, Yet sha
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