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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 970 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 126 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 126 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 114 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 100 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 94 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 88 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 86 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 76 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 74 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 14, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) or search for Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) in all documents.

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inner. But he s ffed his sobs, took the oath again and received the following: Stone Bridge, 3 P. M. To Gen. Scott: That Zouave drummer has played us a mean trick. The scoundrel had originally deserted from our side. The Confederates wouldn't have him, because he was filthy. As he had the seven years itch, they gave him eighty-five cents to come on our side again and give the disease to our soldiers.--After mixing with my men, and giving the itch to two whole regiments from Connecticut, he managed to pass our lines, and escaped. As a consequence of this the regiments above named have taken to the woods at full speed, and are scratching and rubbing themselves against the bushes as they run. Nor is this all. The itch has spread throughout my entire force, and the army is becoming demoralized; so much so that I should not be surprised if my entire force should be taken to the woods before night. I regret also to inform you that the rebels got hungry and captured. Senato
licanism will become avowed Agrarianism, and then, let those who have warmed the serpent into life beware its fangs! Gen. Pierce is the truest friend the South ever had in the North, and the truest friend the North ever had in her own borders. The path of justice and honor is always the path of wisdom and of happiness. It cannot be otherwise, until a just Conetses to rule. If the North had followed the counsels of such men as Franklin Pierce, of New Hampshire, Ex-Gov. Seymour, of Connecticut, (another true and noble gentleman, who, at the head of a respectable and increasing party, is still standing by the Right,) and Vallandigham, and others, of Ohio, she would still be peaceful, prosperous and powerful. But they and their counsels were treated with contempt, and the red flag of the New York Tribune symbolized the spirit, principles and policy of the Northern majority. Strange enough is the spectacle now presented by two former competitors for the Presidency--Gen. Scott, t
an easy matter to put down the "armed combinations" existing there. It was a fatal mistake, and they are at length beginning to find it out. A voice from Connecticut. The Hartford (Conn,) Times says: Since the recent terrible defeat of our Northern army, the truth begins to be acknowledged by our neighbors, that weal; soon upon his heels comes the United States Collector, also appointed by Mr. Lincoln, and the war tax must be paid forthwith--$463,000 is the sum taxed upon Connecticut for the war. About $1,000,000 have already been borrowed by this State, to pay and equip our five regiments. Our snug State fund of near $500,000, well inted in bank stocks, has been spent, and more than double that amount already incurred and demanded. For the first time in the history of our little State, have Connecticut bonds been hawked about the country, and yet the war has just commenced. The great West begins to feel the crushing weight of war. She has no money to pay her