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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 584 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 298 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 112 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 76 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 72 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 62 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 62 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 52 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 50 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 19, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Maine (Maine, United States) or search for Maine (Maine, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

ve ben friendly to the South"--all were opposed to the Government to Lincoln, and the war, and a majority claimed to have been threatened with feathers and tar for their secession proclivities. I presume they thought we believed this gammon, and hoped to get better treatment by lying. It made very little difference, however, what polities they had or professed--one was treated as well as another, and all as prisoners of war. All these vessels were taken while running down the coast of Maine, and the last three or four near the islands of Matinicus and Mohegan in Penobscot bay. We ran close to Martenicus, and saw the people on shore watching our movements. The day was spent cruising around these islands, and burning vessels marked our course. Towards night, Mr. Tynaus, our chief engineer, reported the coal fast going, and in order to get a fresh supply to continue our operations among the fishermen, Captain Wood turned for Halifax, and at dark we were dashing off thirteen kno
o the captain if he wanted more two casks would be thrown overboard for him to pick up. To this he made no reply; so we presumed he had enough to last him in. Later in the day, steering east by south, we fell in with the schooner Spokens, of Maine, bound to New York, with a cargo of laths. She hoisted the United States flag as we came up, and was ordered to heave to. Lieutenant Benton boarded, and after removing chronometer and charts, cut away the masts and scuttled her. Two hours aed to get better treatment by lying. It made very little difference, however, what polities they had or professed--one was treated as well as another, and all as prisoners of war. All these vessels were taken while running down the coast of Maine, and the last three or four near the islands of Matinicus and Mohegan in Penobscot bay. We ran close to Martenicus, and saw the people on shore watching our movements. The day was spent cruising around these islands, and burning vessels marked