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s a matter of fact, is how it was, for unpredictably, incredible to tell, they got the better of the enemy not only through their own valour but also through the gods' specific assistance.Timoleon deployed his forces and advanced down from a line of little hills to the river Crimisus,The river is variously spelled Crimesus (Plut. Timoleon 25.4) and Crimissus (Nepos Timoleon 2.4). where ten thousand of the enemy had already crossed. These he shattered at the first onset, taking his own position in the centre of his line.The story of the battle is told more circumstantially in Plut. Timoleon 27-29. The time was just before the summer solstice of 339 B.C. (Plut. Timoleon 27.1). There was a sharp fight, but as the Greeks were superior both in bravery and in skill, there was great slaughter of the barbarians. The rest began to flee, but the main body of the Carthaginians crossed the river in the mean time and restored the situation.
cerning the Carthaginians, but not advancing proof that Timoleon did not actually speak in this way (12.26a; Jacoby, Fragmente der griechischen Historiker, no. 566, F 31). Just at the moment when all as with one voice were clamouring to attack the barbarians and to begin the battle, it chanced that pack animals came carrying wild celeryThis was the apium graveolens which is also frequently called parsley. It is fragrant (cp. Olck, Real-Encyclop├Ądie, 6 (1909), 255 f.). This anecdote was told by Timaeus (Jacoby, Fragmente der griechischen Historiker, no. 566, F 118) and appears in Plut. Timoleon 26. for their bedding, and Timoleon declared that he accepted the omen of his victory, for the crown at the Isthmian games is woven of this. On his suggestion, the soldiers plaited crowns out of celery and with their heads wreathed advanced cheerfully in the confidence that the gods foretold their victory. And that, as a ma
to receive them kindly and to pay them their arrears he brought the unrest to an end, but also stripped the disobedient men of all credit for the victory. With the rest, whose loyalty he had regained by tactful handling, he marched against the enemy who were encamped not far away. Calling an assembly of the troops, he encouraged them with an address, describing the cowardice of the Phoenicians and recalling the success of Gelon.That is, at the battle of Himera, 480 B.C. Polybius reproaches Timaeus for placing in the mouth of Timoleon derogatory remarks concerning the Carthaginians, but not advancing proof that Timoleon did not actually speak in this way (12.26a; Jacoby, Fragmente der griechischen Historiker, no. 566, F 31). Just at the moment when all as with one voice were clamouring to attack the barbarians and to begin the battle, it chanced that pack animals came carrying wild celeryThis was the apium graveol