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Browsing named entities in Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs).

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Enter by Eisodos A Peleus with retinue. Peleus Women of Phthia, tell me the answer to my question: I have heard an indistinct rumor that Menelaus' daughter has left the house and is gone and have come here eager to learn whether this is true. For those who are at home must be solicitous of the fortunes of their loved ones abroad. Chorus Leader Peleus, the rumor you heard was true, and it is not right for me to conceal the troubles in whose midst I find myself: the queen has gone off in flight from this house. Peleus In fear of what? Continue your account. Chorus Leader Afraid from this house her husband might expel her. Peleus For planning murder of the boy, perhaps? Chorus Leader Yes, and in terror of her serving-woman. Peleus With whom did she leave home? Was it her father? Chorus Leader Agamemnon's son has led her from the land. Peleus In hope of what? Meaning to marry her? Chorus Leader Yes, and contriving death against your grandson. Peleus Crouching in ambush or
Troy (Turkey) (search for this): card 590
h a young man to another country. Was it for her sake, then, that you led such a great throng to Troy? You ought to have spat her away and not moved a single spear once you had discovered her treachery, should have let her stay in Troy and never taken her back into your house, should have payed her a wage to stay away. But your mind did not sail in this direction: rather, you lost lives many andok on you as murderer of Achilles, as if you were some kind of defiler. You alone came back from Troy unwounded, and your fine armor in its fine case you took to Troy and brought back in the same conTroy and brought back in the same condition. I said to Neoptolemus when he was about to marry that he ought not to contract a marriage-alliance with you or take into his house the foal of such a base mother. For such daughters reproducet foolishly! Were you so in fear that you might not have a worthless wife? And when you had taken Troy (for I shall go there also in my argument), you did not kill your wife when you had her in your p
Troy (Turkey) (search for this): card 301
Chorus Slavery's yoke would not have come upon the women of Troy and you, woman, would have come to possess the throne of royalty. She could have loosed Hellas from the grievous toils of ten years' exile the young men with their spears suffered about Troy. And marriage-beds would not now be left desolate and old men bereft of their children. Chorus Slavery's yoke would not have come upon the women of Troy and you, woman, would have come to possess the throne of royalty. She could have loosed Hellas from the grievous toils of ten years' exile the young men with their spears suffered about Troy. And marriage-beds would not now be left desolate and old men bereft of their children.
Greece (Greece) (search for this): card 301
Chorus Slavery's yoke would not have come upon the women of Troy and you, woman, would have come to possess the throne of royalty. She could have loosed Hellas from the grievous toils of ten years' exile the young men with their spears suffered about Troy. And marriage-beds would not now be left desolate and old men bereft of their children.
Troy (Turkey) (search for this): card 545
l, guiltless though he is, along with his unhappy mother. But I entreat you, old sir, falling before your knees—for I cannot touch your beloved chin with my hand— save me, in the gods' name. Otherwise I shall die, sir, with disgrace to you and misery for me. Peleus I order you to loosen her bonds, before someone smarts for it, and to release this woman's two hands. Menelaus But I forbid it, and I am in other ways not inferior to you and have much more authority over her. Peleus What? Will you come here and manage my household? Is it not enough to control affairs in Sparta? Menelaus It was I who took her captive from Troy. Peleus But my grandson received her as his prize of valor. Menelaus Are not my goods all his and his all mine? Peleus Yes, to treat well, not ill, not to kill by the sword. Menelaus Never, be sure, will you take her from my hand. Peleus But I shall, when I have bloodied your head with this sceptre. Menelaus You'll find out if you come closer and touch
Thrace (Greece) (search for this): card 183
too is a means of procuring love. It is not beauty but good qualities that give joy to husbands. But if you get angry, then Sparta is a great city while Scyros, you maintain, is nowhere, you are a rich woman living in the midst of the poor, and Menelaus, you claim, is a greater man than Achilles. It is for this that your husband hates you. A woman, even if given in marriage to a lowly husband, must respect him and not engage in a contest of pride. If you had had as husband a king in snowy Thrace, where one husband divides his bed in turn among many women, would you have killed them? If so you would have clearly branded all women with the charge of sexual insatiability. This is a shameful thing. And yet though we women suffer worse from this disease than men do, at least let us veil it decently from sight. Dearest Hector, I even went so far as to help you in your amours, if Aphrodite ever made you fall, and I often gave the breast to your bastards in order that I might show you no
ded me to deprive you of your lawful due as a wife? [Is it that Sparta is a lesser city than Troy and is surpassed in fortune by it, and that you see me a free woman?] Was it in order that I might bear children instead of you, slaves and a miserable appendage to myself? Or is it that, emboldened by youth and a body in the bloom of its prime, by the greatness of my city and by friends, I mean to possess your house instead of you? Or will people put up with my children as the royal family of Phthia if you do not bear any? Naturally, since the Greeks love me both for Hector's sake . And am I myself obscure and not rather one of Troy's royal family? No, it is not because of any drugs of mine that your husband dislikes you but the fact that you are not fit to live with. For this too is a means of procuring love. It is not beauty but good qualities that give joy to husbands. But if you get angry, then Sparta is
Troy (Turkey) (search for this): card 183
feriors arguments that defeat them. Nonetheless I shall not be guilty of betraying myself. Tell me, young woman, what was the reliable argument that persuaded me to deprive you of your lawful due as a wife? [Is it that Sparta is a lesser city than Troy and is surpassed in fortune by it, and that you see me a free woman?] Was it in order that I might bear children instead of you, slaves and a miserable appendage to myself? Or is it that, emboldened by youth and a body in the bloom of its prime, hildren as the royal family of Phthia if you do not bear any? Naturally, since the Greeks love me both for Hector's sake . And am I myself obscure and not rather one of Troy's royal family? No, it is not because of any drugs of mine that your husband dislikes you but the fact that you are not fit to live with. For this too is a means of procuring love. It is not beauty but good qualities that give joy to husbands. Bu
Hermione (Greece) (search for this): card 147
Enter from the skeneHermione, dressed and bejewelled in impressive style. Hermione The finery of luxurious gold I have about my head and this variegated cloth I wear on my body—I did not wear coming these on my arrival here as the first-fruits of the house of Achilles or of Peleus, but my father Menelaus gave them to me from the city of Sparta together with a large dowry, and therefore I may speak my mind. [So it is with these words that I reply to all of you.] But though you are a slave woman won by the spear, you mean to throw me out of this house and take possession of it: because of your poisons I am hated by my husband, and my womb is perishing unfruitful because of you. The minds of Asian women are clever at such things. But I shall stop you from carrying out this plan, and the temple of the Nereid here will profit you not at all, not its altar or its sanctuary, but you will be put to death. If some god or mortal means to save your life, you must cease from those rich prou
Troy (Turkey) (search for this): card 141
Chorus In my eyes you were much to be pitied when you came, woman of Troy, to the house of my lords. But I hold my peace from fear (though I have pity on your lot) lest the child of Zeus's daughter learn that I wish you w
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