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Canada (Canada) (search for this): article 1
arm and outspoken regard not only for English people, but for English princes." "The son and heir of Queen Victoria, though traveling in a private capacity, is welcomed and feted along every inch of his journey. all press to look at him, all are proud of his coming, and wish him to carry away only pleasant and affectionate recollections of a markable tour. Such a visit is a great epoch in the young Prince's life, the recollections of which can never fade from his memory. He may visit Canada and the States again before he is King of England, and be as well received; he may see India and other portions of his mother's vast dominions, and wherever he goes he will be honored with the loyalty and love of his mother's subjects; but nothing, one would think, will ever equal in depth, clearness and freshness, the impressions of this first transatlantic trip. But it is scarcely less an epoch in the history of the United States. It is a middle point between two eras. The old will comp
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
English view of the late Royal visit. The London Post has an interesting article on the visit of the Prince to the United States, which undoubtedly represents fairly the sentiments of the masses in England towards this country. We have selected portions of the article as follows: "Time has healed all the wounds contractek, will ever equal in depth, clearness and freshness, the impressions of this first transatlantic trip. But it is scarcely less an epoch in the history of the United States. It is a middle point between two eras. The old will compare the public feeling now displayed with what they knew in their youth; the young will recount it in years to come as a great event to date from." "What a past is that which the history of the United States presents! What a growth! What a progress from the disadvantages of a distant and ill-governed colony to all the strength and influence of a great nation! To its fertile soil men have flocked from all parts of the worl
de in Western Virginia. He gives some instances as follows: Mr. Karns leased a piece of ground (two acres,) from Mr. Rathbone, only six miles above mine, for twenty years, and at the depth of 150 feet reached a vein of oil which yields 15 barre.) has been offered $70,000. This well has been in operation, without any decrease in quantity, for over three months. Mr. Rathbone, after he saw the success of Mr. Karns' well, sank one himself below Karns', on the river, and I was there the eveningstern containing 130 barrels of 40 gallons each — that is to say, 5,200 gallons of pure oil, worth 25 cents per gallon. Rathbone's well still continued to pour out the same quantity of oil up to last night, but that they had to stop pumping for want of cisterns and barrels; and that Mr. Karns told him that I had the best and surest prospect for oil next to Rathbone's, on the river. They have made another discovery in a hill or rather mountain on Hugh's River, a tributary of the Kanawha, an
Mattingly (search for this): article 2
of pure oil, worth 25 cents per gallon. Rathbone's well still continued to pour out the same quantity of oil up to last night, but that they had to stop pumping for want of cisterns and barrels; and that Mr. Karns told him that I had the best and surest prospect for oil next to Rathbone's, on the river. They have made another discovery in a hill or rather mountain on Hugh's River, a tributary of the Kanawha, and distant from here some twelve miles. It is the discovery of oil coal. Mr. Mattingly, who owns it, told me himself (for we traveled together through this county a day, prospecting,) that the vein is 1,000 feet in thickness by actual measurement. How wonderful are all these things, and yet how astonishing that they have not been discovered before; but you must remember that this is comparatively a new country, and that the early settlers were neither literary nor scientific men. Put this coal on a shovel and hold it over the fire until it becomes hot, and it all melts an
from Wirt Court-House, which gives an account of the traordinary discoveries of oil now being made in Western Virginia. He gives some instances as follows: Mr. Karns leased a piece of ground (two acres,) from Mr. Rathbone, only six miles above mine, for twenty years, and at the depth of 150 feet reached a vein of oil which yiK.) has been offered $70,000. This well has been in operation, without any decrease in quantity, for over three months. Mr. Rathbone, after he saw the success of Mr. Karns' well, sank one himself below Karns', on the river, and I was there the evening he commenced pumping first. He commenced at 6 o'clock P. M., and pumped until 6 thbone's well still continued to pour out the same quantity of oil up to last night, but that they had to stop pumping for want of cisterns and barrels; and that Mr. Karns told him that I had the best and surest prospect for oil next to Rathbone's, on the river. They have made another discovery in a hill or rather mountain on
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
Oil in Western Virginia. --Astonishing Discoveries.--The Clark county (Va.) Journal contains a letter from Wirt Court-House, which gives an account of the traordinary discoveries of oil now being made in Western Virginia. He gives some instances as follows: Mr. Karns leased a piece of ground (two acres,) from Mr. Rathbone, only six miles above mine, for twenty years, and at the depth of 150 feet reached a vein of oil which yields 15 barrels, of 40 gallons each, per day, worth, at theWestern Virginia. He gives some instances as follows: Mr. Karns leased a piece of ground (two acres,) from Mr. Rathbone, only six miles above mine, for twenty years, and at the depth of 150 feet reached a vein of oil which yields 15 barrels, of 40 gallons each, per day, worth, at the lowest price, 25 cents per gallon, and for which lease of two acres he (Mr. K.) has been offered $70,000. This well has been in operation, without any decrease in quantity, for over three months. Mr. Rathbone, after he saw the success of Mr. Karns' well, sank one himself below Karns', on the river, and I was there the evening he commenced pumping first. He commenced at 6 o'clock P. M., and pumped until 6 o'clock A. M., just twelve hours, and filled a cistern containing 130 barrels of 40 gallon
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
Hot Springs of Arkansas. --A correspondent of the Charleston (S. C.) Mercury thus describes the Hot Springs of Arkansas: The Springs are situated in a narrow valley, about three miles in length, winding among the hills. There are two very pleasant hotels, with numerous cottages on each side of the valley. The springs are on the eastern slope of the hills, at the foot of which runs a small stream or rocky branch. There are over a dozen streams of different degrees of heat; the two largest are hot enough to boil eggs or scald a hog. The character of the rocks on the side of the mountains are evidently volcanic, and large dark broken masses have every appearance of laVa. The water is conducted from the springs to reservoirs on the tops of the bathhouses, so arranged that you may have the douse, shower, plunge or vapor bath, just as you please. The water is quite soft, and as clear and transparent as crystal. When you first bathe in it, it seems impossible to bear the heat
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 3
Hot Springs of Arkansas. --A correspondent of the Charleston (S. C.) Mercury thus describes the Hot Springs of Arkansas: The Springs are situated in a narrow valley, about three miles in length, winding among the hills. There are two very pleasant hotels, with numerous cottages on each side of the valley. The springs are on the eastern slope of the hills, at the foot of which runs a small stream or rocky branch. There are over a dozen streams of different degrees of heat; the two lArkansas: The Springs are situated in a narrow valley, about three miles in length, winding among the hills. There are two very pleasant hotels, with numerous cottages on each side of the valley. The springs are on the eastern slope of the hills, at the foot of which runs a small stream or rocky branch. There are over a dozen streams of different degrees of heat; the two largest are hot enough to boil eggs or scald a hog. The character of the rocks on the side of the mountains are evidently volcanic, and large dark broken masses have every appearance of laVa. The water is conducted from the springs to reservoirs on the tops of the bathhouses, so arranged that you may have the douse, shower, plunge or vapor bath, just as you please. The water is quite soft, and as clear and transparent as crystal. When you first bathe in it, it seems impossible to bear the heat
Hot Springs (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 3
Hot Springs of Arkansas. --A correspondent of the Charleston (S. C.) Mercury thus describes the Hot Springs of Arkansas: The Springs are situated in a narrow valley, about three miles in length, winding among the hills. There are two very pleasant hotels, with numerous cottages on each side of the valley. The springs are on the eastern slope of the hills, at the foot of which runs a small stream or rocky branch. There are over a dozen streams of different degrees of heat; the two largest are hot enough to boil eggs or scald a hog. The character of the rocks on the side of the mountains are evidently volcanic, and large dark broken masses have every appearance of laVa. The water is conducted from the springs to reservoirs on the tops of the bathhouses, so arranged that you may have the douse, shower, plunge or vapor bath, just as you please. The water is quite soft, and as clear and transparent as crystal. When you first bathe in it, it seems impossible to bear the hea
C. Miller (search for this): article 4
Extraordinary Waling feat. --At Utica, N. Y., last week, the extraordinary feat of walking 100 consecutive hours was successfully and satisfactorily accomplished by a young man named Miller. As the time drew to a close, the interest manifested by the public sensibly increased, and reached its climax on Saturday evening, during the most of which the hall was crowded, and the latter portion of the time almost to suffocation. He showed less signs of fatigue and break ing down on Saturday thll, the stillness being often broken with clapping of hands.--Not being content with walking the full time, he kept on his feet some minutes after the time had elapsed, and cries from the audience of "time !" "time !" Finally, bowing himself off, Miller left the stage, jumping to the floor with the alacrity of a fresh man, and was escorted to his room by his friends, amid the clapping of hands, and three cheers from the enthusiastic crowd. After having been vigorously rubbed for about half an h
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