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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 19, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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W. McMINN (search for this): article 1
Ranaway--$5 Reward --From the subscriber, about three weeks since, a Negro Woman, named Nancy, about 20 years of age. She is of dark complexion; has large eyes, and generally looks sullen. The above reward will be paid for her apprehension and delivery to me. de 18--3t* W. McMINN.
een exposed. Such we believe to have been the first motives for embarking on his present course. Since that time everything has conspired to keep him in it. For the rest, the Herald has always been a sensation journal, and has made half of its money by means of sensations. Add to this the well-ascertained truth that the renegade is always the most violent of all others against the cause he has betrayed, and that in war times there is nothing which makes a journal so popular as high-sounding braggadocio and threats of defiance against all the world, and you have, in our opinion, a complete explanation of the causes which launched the Herald upon its present course, and has kept it steadily upon it. Doubtless Bennett in as vindictive as cowardly men generally are, and would be glad to see his persecutors of April overwhelmed in ruin, provided they could be ruined without cost to himself. But we are not disposed to think he would risk his own prosperity for the sake of his revenge.
s "a dying kick." If, in spite of Bethel, Bull Run, Manassas, Springfield, Lexington, &c., Bennett really entertains such an opinion, he must be superlatively silly, and that we all know he is not. Such is a summary of the points taken by the Bee, to prove that Bennett cannot be acting in good faith, but that he is pursuing his revenge by leading the United States into an unfathomable gulf of debt. They are well put, and strongly argued. We have ourselves been inclined to the opinion expressed by the Bee, and have more than once signified it in these columns. Yet, upon farther consideration, we hardly think it tenable. It ascribes to Bennett a policy too refined to form the basis of long continued action. We are disposed to think that what are considered the enigmas of history, are, in general, easily explicable, when we get possession of the circumstances that give rise to the motive power. The world, for three hundred years, was mystified by the intent and purpose of thi
mystified by the intent and purpose of this very Machiavelli, whose policy Bennett is assumed to have adopted, in writing his Prince. It could not conceive how a man who had been tortured and banished, for his exertions in defence of liberty, could invite a manual for the instruction of tyrants. Innumerable theories were broached to explain the riddle, all of them ingenious, and all equally wide of the mark, in that long interval which lies between the age of Cardinal Pole and the days of Macaulay. At last, about fifteen years ago, an original letter from Machiavelli, accompanying the dedication of the Prince to Lorenzo de Medici the younger, was discovered in the archives of Florence, and the mystery was cleared up in an instant. The great poet, historian, and philosopher had become weary of exile. He longed for the refined society and brilliant conversation of Florence. If suffering had not rendered him a less ardent patriot, yet events had taught him the hopelessness of his ca
all belief. Nor does it confine itself to defence. It is continually urging upon it the most extraordinary policy and the most desperate enterprises. It tells Lincoln that his resources in men and money are enormous beyond all possibility of belief. It tells England, France, and Spain that the United States are equal to a struggle with them all combined. It insists upon it that Lincoln shall call out a million of men, and build two hundred ships-of-war in addition to what he already has. It is eternally abusing England in the most violent manner. It was the first to defend the capture and detention of Mason and Slidell. It urges upon Lincoln the mostLincoln the most boundless expenditure of money. It constantly stimulates the North to renewed exertions against the South, involving, of course, an unheard of expenditure, by concealing their numerous defeats, or proclaiming them as victories. It tells them that the South is at its last gasp, and calls the message of President Davis "a dying ki
d the most desperate enterprises. It tells Lincoln that his resources in men and money are enormous beyond all possibility of belief. It tells England, France, and Spain that the United States are equal to a struggle with them all combined. It insists upon it that Lincoln shall call out a million of men, and build two hundred ships-of-war in addition to what he already has. It is eternally abusing England in the most violent manner. It was the first to defend the capture and detention of Mason and Slidell. It urges upon Lincoln the most boundless expenditure of money. It constantly stimulates the North to renewed exertions against the South, involving, of course, an unheard of expenditure, by concealing their numerous defeats, or proclaiming them as victories. It tells them that the South is at its last gasp, and calls the message of President Davis "a dying kick." If, in spite of Bethel, Bull Run, Manassas, Springfield, Lexington, &c., Bennett really entertains such an opinion
ew York Herald upon the course it is at present pursuing. Bennett can scarcely be anything else than "wily and shrewd," saysb compelled the newspapers to hoist the stars and stripes, Bennett was particularly the object of its vengeance. He only escf Bethel, Bull Run, Manassas, Springfield, Lexington, &c., Bennett really entertains such an opinion, he must be superlativelis a summary of the points taken by the Bee, to prove that Bennett cannot be acting in good faith, but that he is pursuing hiconsideration, we hardly think it tenable. It ascribes to Bennett a policy too refined to form the basis of long continued a intent and purpose of this very Machiavelli, whose policy Bennett is assumed to have adopted, in writing his Prince. It cous all. Two traits, very prominent in the character of Bennett, sufficiently account for his present course, without a reresent course, and has kept it steadily upon it. Doubtless Bennett in as vindictive as cowardly men generally are, and would
desperate enterprises. It tells Lincoln that his resources in men and money are enormous beyond all possibility of belief. It tells England, France, and Spain that the United States are equal to a struggle with them all combined. It insists upon it that Lincoln shall call out a million of men, and build two hundred ships-of-war in addition to what he already has. It is eternally abusing England in the most violent manner. It was the first to defend the capture and detention of Mason and Slidell. It urges upon Lincoln the most boundless expenditure of money. It constantly stimulates the North to renewed exertions against the South, involving, of course, an unheard of expenditure, by concealing their numerous defeats, or proclaiming them as victories. It tells them that the South is at its last gasp, and calls the message of President Davis "a dying kick." If, in spite of Bethel, Bull Run, Manassas, Springfield, Lexington, &c., Bennett really entertains such an opinion, he must b
Machiavelli (search for this): article 1
re considered the enigmas of history, are, in general, easily explicable, when we get possession of the circumstances that give rise to the motive power. The world, for three hundred years, was mystified by the intent and purpose of this very Machiavelli, whose policy Bennett is assumed to have adopted, in writing his Prince. It could not conceive how a man who had been tortured and banished, for his exertions in defence of liberty, could invite a manual for the instruction of tyrants. Innumere broached to explain the riddle, all of them ingenious, and all equally wide of the mark, in that long interval which lies between the age of Cardinal Pole and the days of Macaulay. At last, about fifteen years ago, an original letter from Machiavelli, accompanying the dedication of the Prince to Lorenzo de Medici the younger, was discovered in the archives of Florence, and the mystery was cleared up in an instant. The great poet, historian, and philosopher had become weary of exile. He l
England in the most violent manner. It was the first to defend the capture and detention of Mason and Slidell. It urges upon Lincoln the most boundless expenditure of money. It constantly stimulates the North to renewed exertions against the South, involving, of course, an unheard of expenditure, by concealing their numerous defeats, or proclaiming them as victories. It tells them that the South is at its last gasp, and calls the message of President Davis "a dying kick." If, in spite of Bethel, Bull Run, Manassas, Springfield, Lexington, &c., Bennett really entertains such an opinion, he must be superlatively silly, and that we all know he is not. Such is a summary of the points taken by the Bee, to prove that Bennett cannot be acting in good faith, but that he is pursuing his revenge by leading the United States into an unfathomable gulf of debt. They are well put, and strongly argued. We have ourselves been inclined to the opinion expressed by the Bee, and have more than
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