hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pope 13 1 Browse Search
McClellan 12 2 Browse Search
Charles McDowell 8 0 Browse Search
John Morris 8 0 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
Tazewell, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
Lincoln 8 0 Browse Search
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) 7 1 Browse Search
September, 8 AD 6 6 Browse Search
Curtis 6 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 11, 1862., [Electronic resource].

Found 465 total hits in 228 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
Beauregard (search for this): article 9
Indiana, Cincinnati, Ohio, and other places. It is also alleged that a number of clerks in the Government employ are aiding the negroes in perfecting their organization. Our informant is a colored man of this city. Arrests are frequently made in Washington of offensive disloyalists. Dr. Camp, a dentist, was arrested last night for boisterous secession language, and boasting of having communication with Richmond. His effects were searched, and, among other things, a letter from Gen. Beauregard was found. Camp is an old offender, having been arrested some two weeks since on his return from Richmond. He was released through the mediation of the French Minister, since which time he has been comparatively quiet. Recent movements on his part made him an object of suspicion, and last night he was arrested. He was sent to the Old Capitol prison. Rev. D. D. Broadus, a minister of Fredericksburg, was arrested there last week, and brought to the city and committed to Old Capit
Vallandigham (search for this): article 9
ed in every portion of Virginia upon a scale far exceeding anything that has taken place heretofore. In this view the order of the President is a timely one, and secures, beyond a shadow of doubt, the concentration of a force at different points in Virginia that will give the finishing blow to the rebellion within a comparatively short time. The incendiary and mischievous courses of the "infernal republicans" and Jacobins in the last Congress, the efforts of such men as Wickliffe and Vallandigham in arguing in their speeches to Western audiences that the Administration is pledged to a war for the negro, thus creating dissensions; the "wet blanket" articles and attacks upon the President; and our generals by such Abolition sheets as the Tribune, Post, and kindred journals, in their determination to force the Administration into a war against the institution of the South, instead of a war for the Union, and the constant decrying of our financial system by the jobbing journals, have
Later from the North. We have received Northern papers of the 5th inst. Two reports, one from Pope's headquarters and one from Washington, say that Richmond is evacuated. One says, on account of a pestilence, which has broken out, and the otherrested in Alexandria last night, and have been brought hither. Several citizens of Fairfax county, arrested under Gen. Pope's orders, and taken to Springfield station, have been released. Considerable excitement exists in Alexandria and vicinnd military circles in Washington, as well as by the hesitation of the rebels, their fear of attacking either McClellan or Pope, and in their hurrying troops from the Gulf States to Richmond. The quiet but effective system inaugurated by Halleck, and carried into operation by McClellan and Pope, with the assistance of the fames river fleet, may well allay all fears of any disasters in Virginia, and will soon put an end to the work of the panic makers here and elsewhere. We are assured that the
Quantrell (search for this): article 9
itizens of Accomac were imprisoned for various political offences, and females as well as men were not allowed to utter a word in condemnation of the Yankee Government or the Yankee hirelings in Accomac. Execution of a guerrilla.[from the Leavenworth (Kansas) Conservative, July 29.] Jeremiah Hoy, one of the Quantrell guerrillas, was shot at the fort yesterday morning, having been found guilty by the Military Commission of treason and murder. It was proved that Hoy was a member of Quantrell's guerrilla band; that he was accessory to and guilty of the murder of Allison, a citizen of Missouri, and of a United States soldier of Major Banzhaff's command, on the 20th of March, at Blue Bridge Crossing, Jackson county, Mo; also, of burning said bridge; also, of treasonable acts in levying war against the United States. Financial. New York, Monday, August 4--6 P. M. --To- day's bank statement compares as follows with that of last Monday: Week endingLoans.
Later from the North. We have received Northern papers of the 5th inst. Two reports, one from Pope's headquarters and one from Washington, say that Richmond is evacuated. One says, on account of a pestilence, which has broken out, and the other, that the troops have been sent to the Southside. A large war meeting was held in New York on Monday night, which was addressed by Gen. Sickles. Only four men volunteered, and the gallant General, according to the New York papers, "embraced them as they stepped on the platform." The steamer George Weems, on her trip from Baltimore to St. Mary's county, Md., on the 3d, was stopped at Fort McHenry, and searched. Some contraband goods and 102 letters, unstamped, being found on her, all the passengers were taken to the guard-house. The steamer Mary Washington, of the same line, was boarded and 165 unstamped letters found on her.--Her passengers were also arrested. Among the passengers arrested on her were Lewis Wagner of Richmond, James
e off to our gunboats for protection. Yankee Accounts of the skirmishes on the South side. A dispatch from the headquarters of McClellan, dated the 4th inst., says: Yesterday a reconnaissance was made from that point back into the country, to within fourteen miles of Petersburg. It was conducted by Col. Averill, and was composed of 150 of the Fifth United States and 150 of the Third Pennsylvania cavalry, with four companies of the First Michigan infantry. Captains Castor and Bowen, of Gen. McClellan's staff, accompanied them. At Cox's Mills, five miles from the river, they encountered the Thirteenth Virginia cavalry drawn up in line. Our men charged on them, when they broke and ran. They drove them to their encampment, at Sycamore church, two and a half miles further, where they again formed, but were ingloriously put to flight, leaving behind all their tents, camp equipage, and commissary stores, which our troops gathered together and burned. The rebels had tw
August 15th (search for this): article 9
nspector at the Baltimore Custom House. The inevitable drafting order has at last fallen on the North. The following is the document. War Department,Washington,August 4, 1862. Ordered, First.--That a draft of three hundred thousand militia be immediately called into the service, to serve for nine months, unless sooner discharged. The Secretary of War will assign the quotas to the States, and establish regulations for the draft. Second.--That if any State shall not by the 15th of August furnish its quota of the additional three hundred thousand volunteers authorized by law, the deficiency of volunteers in that State will also be made up by special draft from the militia. The Secretary of War will establish regulations for this purpose. Third.--Regulations will be prepared by the War Department, and presented to the Pesident, with the object of securing the promotion of officers of the army and volunteers for meritorious and distinguished services, and of preventing
T. N. Conrad (search for this): article 9
rench Minister, since which time he has been comparatively quiet. Recent movements on his part made him an object of suspicion, and last night he was arrested. He was sent to the Old Capitol prison. Rev. D. D. Broadus, a minister of Fredericksburg, was arrested there last week, and brought to the city and committed to Old Capitol. It is understood that he is held as a hostage for the return of several Union citizens of Fredericksburg, held as prisoners by the Confederates. Rev. T. N. Conrad, who has recently been preaching for the Southern Methodist church, has been arrested by the Provost Marshal and sent to the Old Capitol prison. The charges against him are, holding communication with the enemy and attempting to get his scholars as recruits to the rebel army. B. Wheat, W. C. Taylor, and Dr. J. B. Johnson, were arrested in Alexandria last night, and have been brought hither. Several citizens of Fairfax county, arrested under Gen. Pope's orders, and taken to S
August 4th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 9
und on her, all the passengers were taken to the guard-house. The steamer Mary Washington, of the same line, was boarded and 165 unstamped letters found on her.--Her passengers were also arrested. Among the passengers arrested on her were Lewis Wagner of Richmond, James Graves, of Virginia, and Major Abraham Barnes, late inspector at the Baltimore Custom House. The inevitable drafting order has at last fallen on the North. The following is the document. War Department,Washington,August 4, 1862. Ordered, First.--That a draft of three hundred thousand militia be immediately called into the service, to serve for nine months, unless sooner discharged. The Secretary of War will assign the quotas to the States, and establish regulations for the draft. Second.--That if any State shall not by the 15th of August furnish its quota of the additional three hundred thousand volunteers authorized by law, the deficiency of volunteers in that State will also be made up by special d
Wickliffe (search for this): article 9
rations commenced in every portion of Virginia upon a scale far exceeding anything that has taken place heretofore. In this view the order of the President is a timely one, and secures, beyond a shadow of doubt, the concentration of a force at different points in Virginia that will give the finishing blow to the rebellion within a comparatively short time. The incendiary and mischievous courses of the "infernal republicans" and Jacobins in the last Congress, the efforts of such men as Wickliffe and Vallandigham in arguing in their speeches to Western audiences that the Administration is pledged to a war for the negro, thus creating dissensions; the "wet blanket" articles and attacks upon the President; and our generals by such Abolition sheets as the Tribune, Post, and kindred journals, in their determination to force the Administration into a war against the institution of the South, instead of a war for the Union, and the constant decrying of our financial system by the jobbing
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...