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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 7, 1863., [Electronic resource].

Found 393 total hits in 177 results.

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Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
From Northern Virginia. --Since our last report, we have heard nothing new in regard to affairs on the Rappahannock. That there is nothing doing in the army, and no prospect of early activity, is the opinion of those who have recently left the camp. We have many rumors in circulation, invented by those who have nothing else to do, with reference to important changes, which are hardly worthy to be noticed, and not entitled to credit.
From Tennessee. --Passengers, who arrived in Lynchburg Friday from the West, report that Knoxville was occupied on Tuesday by 900 of the enemy, mounted — mostly East Tennesseeans. They commenced at once arresting prominent Secessionists, and it was reported that some had been hung. Three locomotives were captured. Buckner had previously fallen back to London, on the Tennessee, and Gen. Jackson's forces are at Bristol. The Yankees are said to be in strong force at Jacksboro', 40 miles from Knoxville.
From Tennessee. --Passengers, who arrived in Lynchburg Friday from the West, report that Knoxville was occupied on Tuesday by 900 of the enemy, mounted — mostly East Tennesseeans. They commenced at once arresting prominent Secessionists, and it was reported that some had been hung. Three locomotives were captured. Buckner had previously fallen back to London, on the Tennessee, and Gen. Jackson's forces are at Bristol. The Yankees are said to be in strong force at Jacksboro', 40 miles from Knoxville.
Lynchburg Friday (search for this): article 2
From Tennessee. --Passengers, who arrived in Lynchburg Friday from the West, report that Knoxville was occupied on Tuesday by 900 of the enemy, mounted — mostly East Tennesseeans. They commenced at once arresting prominent Secessionists, and it was reported that some had been hung. Three locomotives were captured. Buckner had previously fallen back to London, on the Tennessee, and Gen. Jackson's forces are at Bristol. The Yankees are said to be in strong force at Jacksboro', 40 miles from Knoxville.
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 2
From Tennessee. --Passengers, who arrived in Lynchburg Friday from the West, report that Knoxville was occupied on Tuesday by 900 of the enemy, mounted — mostly East Tennesseeans. They commenced at once arresting prominent Secessionists, and it was reported that some had been hung. Three locomotives were captured. Buckner had previously fallen back to London, on the Tennessee, and Gen. Jackson's forces are at Bristol. The Yankees are said to be in strong force at Jacksboro', 40 miles from Knoxville.
Jacksboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 2
From Tennessee. --Passengers, who arrived in Lynchburg Friday from the West, report that Knoxville was occupied on Tuesday by 900 of the enemy, mounted — mostly East Tennesseeans. They commenced at once arresting prominent Secessionists, and it was reported that some had been hung. Three locomotives were captured. Buckner had previously fallen back to London, on the Tennessee, and Gen. Jackson's forces are at Bristol. The Yankees are said to be in strong force at Jacksboro', 40 miles from Knoxville.
timate, over five hundred shot and shell had been thrown at us, when the enemy became tired of the fun and ceased firing. We watched them as they limbered up and started on the retreat, and Lieut. Hudgins, by way of a parting salute, sent Midshipman Gardner to give them the compliments of the old thirty two, still on the decks of the Satellite. The final shot accelerated their retreat, and almost before its echoes had died away all had disappeared behind the hills beyond. Not a particle of dem on to Milford. The coolness of both officers and men during this day's work was a little remarkable. Some of them had never been under fire before. Lt. Hudgins was in command, as I have previously remarked, and the guns were fought by Midshipmen Gardner, Goodwyn, and Cook. The men obeyed orders with alacrity, manning their guns, in a very exposed position, in the face of a heavy fire. On Thursday Col. Wood came up from Richmond, bringing a train of transportation wagons. The work th
ion commanding both the river and the opposite side. Only one smooth bore thirty-two was left upon the decks. All this time our four wagons had been busily engaged in transporting the things to Mifford Station, on the Fredericksburg R. R., and Mr. Wood had gone to Richmond to procure further transportation.-- Lieut. Hudgins was left in command. Monday was a hot day, but towards evening it became cool and pleasant, and I determined to go ashore to enjoy a twilight walk through the desolateas in command, as I have previously remarked, and the guns were fought by Midshipmen Gardner, Goodwyn, and Cook. The men obeyed orders with alacrity, manning their guns, in a very exposed position, in the face of a heavy fire. On Thursday Col. Wood came up from Richmond, bringing a train of transportation wagons. The work then went on rapidly, the men, although much fatigued, working well when his eye was upon them. The enemy did not return, and the trains were loaded unmolested Friday
a mile. This challenge was promptly responded to by Lieut. Hudgins, who returned two shots with admirable aim, the shells exploding exactly at the enemy's guns. These shots are said to have done more damage than all the rest during the day's firing. If the report of a citizen be true, a staff officer was killed, a man wounded, a gun injured, and one horse disabled. Afterwards the firing became general, the Yankees opening with four other pieces. Unfortunately, our best gun, a splendid Parrott, was thrown down after the first shot, and could be used no more; for it was impossible to remount it under the heavy fire of rifle shell and spherical case poured in upon us. The two smaller guns remained, and these replied leisurely to the rapid shots of the enemy. Probably perceiving their fire had no effect, the Yankees moved down abreast of us, at a distance of about twelve hundred yards. Here they fired at least two shell a minute for a hour, Lieut. Hudgins firing half a dozen, p
otherwise she was in no way the worse for the fight. Had she been in motion I doubt if she would have been struck at all. After a few hours rest the men again loaded the wagons with the material on shore and started them on to Milford. The coolness of both officers and men during this day's work was a little remarkable. Some of them had never been under fire before. Lt. Hudgins was in command, as I have previously remarked, and the guns were fought by Midshipmen Gardner, Goodwyn, and Cook. The men obeyed orders with alacrity, manning their guns, in a very exposed position, in the face of a heavy fire. On Thursday Col. Wood came up from Richmond, bringing a train of transportation wagons. The work then went on rapidly, the men, although much fatigued, working well when his eye was upon them. The enemy did not return, and the trains were loaded unmolested Friday everything was removed, and in the evening the steamers were scuttled and burned and the schooners destroyed.
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