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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 26, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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Suicide. --Miss Jones, of Monroe county, Indiana, was ruined a short time since by a man named Braham, who promised to marry her. She procured his arrest and made affidavit of the fact, but Braham introduced a witness who deposed that Miss Jones had told him that she had not been seduced under promise of marriage. The poor Braham introduced a witness who deposed that Miss Jones had told him that she had not been seduced under promise of marriage. The poor girl in her despair then said she would not disgrace her family, and calling for a glass of water suddenly emptied into it a deadly poison, and refusing all aid, died in a few minutes. The people talk strongly of lynching Braham. sed that Miss Jones had told him that she had not been seduced under promise of marriage. The poor girl in her despair then said she would not disgrace her family, and calling for a glass of water suddenly emptied into it a deadly poison, and refusing all aid, died in a few minutes. The people talk strongly of lynching Braham.
ant-at-Arms to "clear the galleries." Mr. Goode appealed to the President to countermand the order, but he declined. In compliance with the hint, the populace began to move towards the doors, when Mr. Franklin Thomas, a citizen of Richmond, exclaimed in a loud voice-- Mr. President! I have one single appeal to make. A motion was made that he be taken into custody, to which Mr. Thomas expressed his willingness, but the motion was withdrawn. After quiet had been restored, Mr. Brent, of Alexandria, moved that the resolutions under consideration be laid on the table until morning, as Mr. Goode did not desire to proceed with his remarks this afternoon. The motion was agreed to. Mr. Montague called the attention of the President to the fact, that an individual had been taken into custody in compliance with an order from the Chair, and asked that the matter be disposed of. The President said he gave no such order, and went on to explain what had occurred.
C. W. P. Brock (search for this): article 1
Slaves--$5 per week. Less than a week, $1 per day; but not to exceed $5 per week. Fractions over the first week 71 cents per day. No extra charges except for surgical operations, and then an additional fee ranging from $2 to $30 will be charged. Bills payable on the removal of the patient. No small pox admitted. A covered spring wagon will convey patients to and from the Hospital when desired. Orders may be left at the Hospital, or at the office of A. L. Holladay, 12th street, between Main and Cary. The subscriber, who has been connected with he institution since its foundation, having taken it under his exclusive charge, aided by competent assistants, solicits a continuance of the liberal patronage of his friends and of the public generally. Attending Physician and Surgeon. James Bolton, M. D., Grace street, between 4th and 5th. Assistants: C. W. P. Brock, M. D. Church Hill, cor. 25th and Marshall sts. C. M. Hunter, Resident Physician. ja 18--ly
R. T. Brooke (search for this): article 2
Life, fire and Marine Insurance.Richmond fire Association.office, no. 158 Main (N. E. Corner of 11th) St.,Richmond, Va.Chartered 29th March, 1837. This old and reliable Institution, with ample capital, and contingent fund carefully invested, continues to insure Slaves, Buildings, Merchandize, of every description; Household Furniture and Family Wearing Apparel, vessels, Cargoes and Freight, at the lowest current rates. Losses adjusted and paid with all possible dispatch. Directors: David Currie, C. T. Wortham, John H. Claiborne, John J. Wilson, Alex. Garrett, Robert M. Burton, Francis J. Barnes, John T. Sublett, Thos. A. Rust, Geo. N. Gwathmey. David Currie, President. John J. Wilson, Treasurer. R. T. Brooke, Secretary. de 27--ly
The Georgia Branch Mint. --A correspondent of the Atlanta (Ga.) Intelligencer informs that paper that the Superintendent of the United States Branch Mint at Dahlonega now holds that property, together with $20,000 in gold coin, therein contained, for the State of Georgia, under a written order from Gov. Brown.
The seizure of ships at Savannah. The following is the letter written by Gov. Brown in ordering the seizure of the New York ships, at Savannah, on the 21st: Executive Department Milledgeville Feb. 21st, 1861. Sir On the fifth day of this month I directed you to call out sufficient military force, and seize all ships then in the harbor of Savannah belonging to citizens of the State of New York. The reasons for the seizure were briefly stated in the order. Citizens of this State had been robbed of their property by the police of New York, acting under the authority of that State. I had demanded the restoration of the property to its owners. The Governor of that State had given an evasive reply, excepting to the form of the demand sent by telegraph; which clearly evinced his disposition not to comply by ordering the restoration of the property. If the protection of this State were not in such case afforded to its citizens, it not only invited further aggressions upon
William P. Browne (search for this): article 4
Supreme Court of Appeals. --Present Judges Allen, Daniel, Moncure, and Robertson. The following decrees have been entered since our last report of 20th February: The petition of Wm. M. Hume, adm'r. of Jas. Moxley, dec'd , for an appeal from decree of Circuit Court of Fauquier county of 6th September, 1860, in a suit in which petitioner was plaintiff, and Meredith Eskridge and others were defendants, heard and denied. Nathan A. Holman vs. Michael Hart, upon a writ of supersedeas from judgment of Circuit Court of Buckingham county. Partly heard — no decision. Petition of Maria E. Kirkmeyer, adm'x. of Fred. Kirkmeyer, for a writ of supersedeas to a judgment rendered by Henrico Circuit Court Oct. 9, 1860, affirming, with costs, a judgment recovered by James Jones against the said petitioner, denied. Wm. P. Browne vs. Wm. Rencher, &c., upon appeal from decree of Circuit Court of city of Williamsburg and County of James City. Partly heard — no decisio
troduction of Southern spun cotton yarns into the markets of France, Belgium, Switzerland, Germany and Russia. The Convention was largely attended by cotton planters and others. A report was adopted, in favor of making up a complete set of samples of Southern spun yarns to be forwarded to Europe, and of taking steps to obtain accurate information from abroad as to prices, styles, numbers and kinds of cotton yarns saleable in foreign markets. The Convention was addressed by Messrs. Fulton, Brumby, Bayton and other gentlemen. Mr. Bayton made a statement of the financial, commercial and industrial issues, bound up in the political future of the South. He argued that separate political existence, unaccompanied by financial and commercial independence, was but the shadow without the substance of liberty. A resolution was adopted in favor of a Cotton Spinners' and Planters' Convention, at Atlanta, on the 19th ult., --and inviting all the Cotton States, in favor of Direct Trade, to send
Black Republican cohorts show no signs of compromise. It is now believed that Weed has the inside track for the spoils, a fact which harrows the sensibilities of the patriotic Horace to the core. He professes to have no taste nor scent for the official larder, nevertheless, because Mr. Seward, in the innocence of his unsophisticated nature, did not offer him that which he supposed he would not have, he defeated the Presidential aspirations of Seward at Chicago and secured the nomination of the "Honest Old Ape" of Illinois. Now comes Seward's revenge. He is made Premier, and his trusty Lieutenant, Thurlow Weed, outgeneraling Greeley at every move, is believed to control the dispensation of the official patronage. To a man of Horace's high sense of honor, this ingratitude of Lincoln must be as crushing as the dagger with which "the well beloved Brutus"" stabbed the Roman tyrant. We expect to hear soon that "Ingratitude, more keen than traitor's steel," has made an end of Greeley.
sitting room. Mr. Seward again joined him shortly before 11 A. M., and taking a carriage, they proceeded to the Executive mansion to call, quietly, on President Buchanan, who was then in Cabinet Council--the Cabinet having been called to meet to-day at half-past 9. Mr. Buchanan is said to have been greatly surprised on havinMr. Buchanan is said to have been greatly surprised on having Mr. Lincoln's card so unexpectedly sent up to him. He received him and Mr. Seward immediately, in his private parlor, where they had a social and agreeable interview of fifteen minutes duration; at the termination of which Mr. Buchanan, conducting his so unexpected guests up stairs to his office room, introduced Mr. Lincoln to hMr. Buchanan, conducting his so unexpected guests up stairs to his office room, introduced Mr. Lincoln to his constitutional advisers, by all of whom he was gracefully and cordially greeted. On retiring from that chamber, they met Messrs. Bigler and John Cochrane in the house, and Mr. Seward presented those gentlemen to the President elect. From the President's house the twain drove to see Gen. Scott, with whom they remained for
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