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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 26, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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ormation from abroad as to prices, styles, numbers and kinds of cotton yarns saleable in foreign markets. The Convention was addressed by Messrs. Fulton, Brumby, Bayton and other gentlemen. Mr. Bayton made a statement of the financial, commercial and industrial issues, bound up in the political future of the South. He argued that separate political existence, unaccompanied by financial and commercial independence, was but the shadow without the substance of liberty. A resolution was adopted in favor of a Cotton Spinners' and Planters' Convention, at Atlanta, on the 19th ult., --and inviting all the Cotton States, in favor of Direct Trade, to send delegates. There is palpable truth in the argument of Mr. Batton. "Separate political existence, unaccompanied by financial and commercial independence, is but the shadow without the substance of liberty." The practical sense for which Georgia is pre-eminent will never rest satisfied until it has accomplished this essential object.
s into the markets of France, Belgium, Switzerland, Germany and Russia. The Convention was largely attended by cotton planters and others. A report was adopted, in favor of making up a complete set of samples of Southern spun yarns to be forwarded to Europe, and of taking steps to obtain accurate information from abroad as to prices, styles, numbers and kinds of cotton yarns saleable in foreign markets. The Convention was addressed by Messrs. Fulton, Brumby, Bayton and other gentlemen. Mr. Bayton made a statement of the financial, commercial and industrial issues, bound up in the political future of the South. He argued that separate political existence, unaccompanied by financial and commercial independence, was but the shadow without the substance of liberty. A resolution was adopted in favor of a Cotton Spinners' and Planters' Convention, at Atlanta, on the 19th ult., --and inviting all the Cotton States, in favor of Direct Trade, to send delegates. There is palpable trut
William E. Beale (search for this): article 8
isburg to Washington has been noticed. The Baltimore American has the following account of the trip: The Baltimore Committee, consisting of Messrs. Gunnison, Beale, Snethen, Gleason and others, being anxious to have an interview with Mr. Lincoln, applied at the door of his room on Saturday morning, at Harrisburg, and it, was rrival of the cars and the appearance on the platform of the Baltimore Republican Committee, they were received with groans and hootings. A rush was made at William E. Beale and Francis S. Corkran, but they were protected by the police, and neither of them were injured further than knocking their hats over their eyes. The following was the Committee: William G. Snethen, Chairman; Judge Wm. L. Marshall, L. Blumenberg, of Gay street; James E. Bishop, Wm. E. Gleeson, and Wm. E. Beale. Hon. Judge Palmer, of Frederick, was with the party. Mrs. Lincoln and her three sons proceeded to the residence of Colonel John S. Gittings, President of the Northern Cen
J. P. Benjamin (search for this): article 3
The Southern Congress. Montgomery,Ala., Feb. 25. --A resolution was adopted to-day, instructing the committee to inquire into the present condition of the public lands. Mr. Rhett announced that the committee would report the permanent Constitution on Wednesday. The following appointments have been confirmed: Henry F. West, of Miss., Postmaster General; J. P. Benjamin, of Louisiana, Attorney General. It is rumored that Mallory, of Florida, is to be Secretary of the Navy. The Commissioners to Washington are: Abraham, of Louisiana; M. J. Crawford, of Georgia; John Forsythe, of Alabama.
Joseph E. Beown (search for this): article 1
of nations, or the Constitution and laws of this State, have placed at my command. It therefore becomes my duty again to direct you to call out such military force as may be necessary for that purpose, and to renew the reprisals, by the seizure, as soon as practicable, of vessels in the harbor of Savannah, or other property in the city, or elsewhere within your reach, belonging to the State or to citizens of New York, at least equal in value to double the amount of the original seizures made by you. You will hold the property so seized subject to my order; and it will be released when the guns in question, (together with any other property of our citizens which has been, or may in the meantime be unlawfully seized by the authorities of New York,) are actually shipped from the harbor, and are beyond the reach or control of the police of the city of New York, or the authorities of that State. Respectfully, &c., Joseph E. Beown. Col. Henry B. Jackson, Aid-de-Camp, Savannah, Ga.
John W. Beveridge (search for this): article 2
Hard party. --James T. Leathers, Lucy Leathers, Sarah McKinney and Caroline Lehman were arraigned before the Mayor yesterday, on the complaint of Peter Blackburn, John W. Beveridge and John Clash, residents of Brooke Avenue, who charge the parties with using vulgar, obscene and indecent language, to the disgust of people having occasion to pass their respective domicils. The evidence exhibited the party in an unamiable attitude as good and law-abiding citizens. The "muss" that brought forth the accusation was between Sarah McKinney (aided by old Mrs. Leathers) and Caroline Lehman, in which language was used not fit for ears polite. Old Leathers — a well-tanned specimen of the article — was also around, while the women folks had rocks, sticks of wood, and collies of strong expletives to back their judgments with. He told the Mayor he came here from Orange county, and "came to do better." The Mayor told him it was the worst place in the world he could pitch on for any such enc
Congressional. Washington, Feb. 25. --Senate--The House Oregon war debt bill will be the special order for to-morrow. Mr. Bigler, of Pa., presented various memorials relative to the present crisis. Mr. Sumner presented a petition memorializing Congress to abolish slavery in all the States. Mr. Sumner said he presented the memorial only because it was couched in respectful terms. He did not believe Congress had the power to interfere with slavery in the States where it already existed. The Senate took up the Postal suspension bill. Mr. Fitz called up the amendment to strike out the words "in consequence of any insurrection or rebellion." Mr. Mason favored the amendment. The Constitution gave the Federal Government no power with regard to insurrection. Mr. Fitz withdrew the amendment. Mr. Wigfall opposed the resolution. After a long debate, the bill passed; but in an unintelligible form to the reporter. The Civil and Miscellaneous
have been greatly surprised on having Mr. Lincoln's card so unexpectedly sent up to him. He received him and Mr. Seward immediately, in his private parlor, where they had a social and agreeable interview of fifteen minutes duration; at the termination of which Mr. Buchanan, conducting his so unexpected guests up stairs to his office room, introduced Mr. Lincoln to his constitutional advisers, by all of whom he was gracefully and cordially greeted. On retiring from that chamber, they met Messrs. Bigler and John Cochrane in the house, and Mr. Seward presented those gentlemen to the President elect. From the President's house the twain drove to see Gen. Scott, with whom they remained for perhaps fifteen minutes in social intercourse. They returned to the hotel shortly before 12 M., and Mr. Lincoln immediately retired to his chamber to rest, giving directions that he was not then prepared to receive any of the numerous crowd of intensely interested friends who had been kicking t
James E. Bishop (search for this): article 8
s for the sake of the loaves and fishes. On the arrival of the cars and the appearance on the platform of the Baltimore Republican Committee, they were received with groans and hootings. A rush was made at William E. Beale and Francis S. Corkran, but they were protected by the police, and neither of them were injured further than knocking their hats over their eyes. The following was the Committee: William G. Snethen, Chairman; Judge Wm. L. Marshall, L. Blumenberg, of Gay street; James E. Bishop, Wm. E. Gleeson, and Wm. E. Beale. Hon. Judge Palmer, of Frederick, was with the party. Mrs. Lincoln and her three sons proceeded to the residence of Colonel John S. Gittings, President of the Northern Central Railway, at Mount Vernon Square, having accepted an invitation tendered to them on their way to this city, so as to relieve them from the crowd and the excitement. They left the cars, we learn, at the junction of Charles street, where Mr. Gittings' carriage was in waiting fo
Peter Blackburn (search for this): article 2
Hard party. --James T. Leathers, Lucy Leathers, Sarah McKinney and Caroline Lehman were arraigned before the Mayor yesterday, on the complaint of Peter Blackburn, John W. Beveridge and John Clash, residents of Brooke Avenue, who charge the parties with using vulgar, obscene and indecent language, to the disgust of people having occasion to pass their respective domicils. The evidence exhibited the party in an unamiable attitude as good and law-abiding citizens. The "muss" that brought forth the accusation was between Sarah McKinney (aided by old Mrs. Leathers) and Caroline Lehman, in which language was used not fit for ears polite. Old Leathers — a well-tanned specimen of the article — was also around, while the women folks had rocks, sticks of wood, and collies of strong expletives to back their judgments with. He told the Mayor he came here from Orange county, and "came to do better." The Mayor told him it was the worst place in the world he could pitch on for any such enc
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