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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 11, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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February 6th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 2
[correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] another Yankee story Proved false. Middlssex County, Va., February 6, 1862. Having seen in your paper of Saturday last an article taken from the Philadelphia Inquirer, headed "Fight at the mouth of the Rappahannock river--Confederate schooner burned," written by an officer on board of one of the steamers blockading the Rappahannock river, and knowing that no such schooner has either been burned or captured, I deem it proper to make known through your paper to the public the facts of the case. The circumstances connected with the fight are simply theses: During the week preceding the engagement the Yankees had landed in Middlesex, and wantonly burned a private dwelling; and as it was supposed that similar depredations would be attempted, Captain Fleet. of the Middlesex artillery, with three guns and a portion of his company, proceeded to a point opposite to which the blockading steamers were lying, and there planted his cannon.
Rappahannock (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
nce of the Richmond Dispatch.] another Yankee story Proved false. Middlssex County, Va., February 6, 1862. Having seen in your paper of Saturday last an article taken from the Philadelphia Inquirer, headed "Fight at the mouth of the Rappahannock river--Confederate schooner burned," written by an officer on board of one of the steamers blockading the Rappahannock river, and knowing that no such schooner has either been burned or captured, I deem it proper to make known through your paper Rappahannock river, and knowing that no such schooner has either been burned or captured, I deem it proper to make known through your paper to the public the facts of the case. The circumstances connected with the fight are simply theses: During the week preceding the engagement the Yankees had landed in Middlesex, and wantonly burned a private dwelling; and as it was supposed that similar depredations would be attempted, Captain Fleet. of the Middlesex artillery, with three guns and a portion of his company, proceeded to a point opposite to which the blockading steamers were lying, and there planted his cannon. On the 15th o
Sturgeon, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 2
mpany, proceeded to a point opposite to which the blockading steamers were lying, and there planted his cannon. On the 15th of January, Captain Fleet, finding it necessary for some purpose, directed a yacht which was in the vicinity to be removed from one point to another. The Yankees, having caught a glimpse of the yacht, immediately started in pursuit with the larger steamer. This rendered it necessary that the yacht. in order to escape and reach a place of safety, should run into Sturgeon's creek, where the men who were in her went ashore. When the steamer came up opposite to the mouth of the creek, two boats, with about 20 men in each, were dispatched for the purpose of capturing the yacht, while she continued to shell the shore for a mile up and down, in order to protect her boats; which, having advanced within 300 yards of the nearest cannon, Capt. Fleet opened fire on them with canister; whereupon they immediately wheeled about and returned with the utmost precipitation
Middlesex Village (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 2
en from the Philadelphia Inquirer, headed "Fight at the mouth of the Rappahannock river--Confederate schooner burned," written by an officer on board of one of the steamers blockading the Rappahannock river, and knowing that no such schooner has either been burned or captured, I deem it proper to make known through your paper to the public the facts of the case. The circumstances connected with the fight are simply theses: During the week preceding the engagement the Yankees had landed in Middlesex, and wantonly burned a private dwelling; and as it was supposed that similar depredations would be attempted, Captain Fleet. of the Middlesex artillery, with three guns and a portion of his company, proceeded to a point opposite to which the blockading steamers were lying, and there planted his cannon. On the 15th of January, Captain Fleet, finding it necessary for some purpose, directed a yacht which was in the vicinity to be removed from one point to another. The Yankees, having c
McClellan (search for this): article 4
What the North Thiske of the war thus far. The Cinclunati Daily Commercial presents the following coup d'ail of the military situation at the present moment. It should serve to comfort impatient and desponding quidnunces: "The man who has been most constant, energetic, and efficient in the work of converting the crude masses of volunteers into disciplined soldiers, and thus preparing in the camps for successes in the field, is General McClellan, We do not claim, for him the exclusive credit of the marked and momentous improvement of our armies; but his has been the highest place, and there is no reasn to doubt that he has performed his duty. Others of our military educators have performed their duty, but not on as wide a field, and not under the pressure of such tremendous responsibilities as have devoived upon him. "Six months ago the three months men were disbanding in the face of the Bull Run disaster; cowardly peace men lifting their voices in the North; the depa
pressure of such tremendous responsibilities as have devoived upon him. "Six months ago the three months men were disbanding in the face of the Bull Run disaster; cowardly peace men lifting their voices in the North; the department of Missouri in confusion, Lyon dead, and the guerilas swarming over the State; Kentucky was reeling tinder the shock of secession victory and torn by the contentions between those whose doctrines were the teachings of Clay and those who were the followers of Calhoun; the city of Washington was menaced by a powerful army, flushed with victory, and infuriated with the lust of conquest, and passion for revenge, and the blockade was far less efficient than it should be to strangle our enemies and command the respect of foreign powers. Now, the safety of Washington has become an old joke. Our lines have been advanced from a defensive to an aggressive position, and the brief but destructive encounter at Drainsville has taught the enemy prudence in their ma
Humphrey Marshall (search for this): article 4
. In no considersble skirmish in that State have the rebels been auccessful, and their centre is broken by a splendid Union victory, which practically annihilates a whole division of their army. The rebels have been entirely foiled in endeavoring to wrest Western Virginia from the United States troops. General Lee retired in despair from Greenbrier, and Gen. Floyd ran away from Cotton Mountain. Two rebel raids into Eastern Kentucky have been met and repulsed, and at last accounts Humphrey Marshall, and his discomfitted followers, utterly demoralized, were running through Pound Gap. An army of near twenty thousand men, under General Lander, looks up the Valley of Virginia toward Winchester. The gun-boat fleet at Cairo is well advanced, and there will be no difficulty, presently, when Gen Halleck pacifies Missouri, in starting the long talked of Mississippi expedition by land and river, in proportions commensurate with the conquests expected of it, On the Western frontier, also,
and well appointed army in Kentucky, and the soil of than State has been a dark and bloody ground indeed to the rebels who have invaded it. In no considersble skirmish in that State have the rebels been auccessful, and their centre is broken by a splendid Union victory, which practically annihilates a whole division of their army. The rebels have been entirely foiled in endeavoring to wrest Western Virginia from the United States troops. General Lee retired in despair from Greenbrier, and Gen. Floyd ran away from Cotton Mountain. Two rebel raids into Eastern Kentucky have been met and repulsed, and at last accounts Humphrey Marshall, and his discomfitted followers, utterly demoralized, were running through Pound Gap. An army of near twenty thousand men, under General Lander, looks up the Valley of Virginia toward Winchester. The gun-boat fleet at Cairo is well advanced, and there will be no difficulty, presently, when Gen Halleck pacifies Missouri, in starting the long talked o
s improvement of our armies; but his has been the highest place, and there is no reasn to doubt that he has performed his duty. Others of our military educators have performed their duty, but not on as wide a field, and not under the pressure of such tremendous responsibilities as have devoived upon him. "Six months ago the three months men were disbanding in the face of the Bull Run disaster; cowardly peace men lifting their voices in the North; the department of Missouri in confusion, Lyon dead, and the guerilas swarming over the State; Kentucky was reeling tinder the shock of secession victory and torn by the contentions between those whose doctrines were the teachings of Clay and those who were the followers of Calhoun; the city of Washington was menaced by a powerful army, flushed with victory, and infuriated with the lust of conquest, and passion for revenge, and the blockade was far less efficient than it should be to strangle our enemies and command the respect of foreign
ped up by our movable columns. We have an immense and well appointed army in Kentucky, and the soil of than State has been a dark and bloody ground indeed to the rebels who have invaded it. In no considersble skirmish in that State have the rebels been auccessful, and their centre is broken by a splendid Union victory, which practically annihilates a whole division of their army. The rebels have been entirely foiled in endeavoring to wrest Western Virginia from the United States troops. General Lee retired in despair from Greenbrier, and Gen. Floyd ran away from Cotton Mountain. Two rebel raids into Eastern Kentucky have been met and repulsed, and at last accounts Humphrey Marshall, and his discomfitted followers, utterly demoralized, were running through Pound Gap. An army of near twenty thousand men, under General Lander, looks up the Valley of Virginia toward Winchester. The gun-boat fleet at Cairo is well advanced, and there will be no difficulty, presently, when Gen Hall
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