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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
h the date of his sailing was postponed; and, what with two visits to Ireland, the publication of a controversial pamphlet, Right and Wrong among the Abolitionists of the United States: or, the Objects, Principles, and Measures of the Original American A. S. Society Unchanged. By John A. Collins, Representative of the A. A. S. S. Glasgow: Geo. Gallie, 1841 (Lib. 11: 77, 138). This was begun, with the aid of Elizabeth Pease, in the latter part of January, and was out by the third week in March (Mss. Feb. 2, 1841, E. Pease to W. L. G., and Mar. 24, to Collins). and the confirmation of the Scotch alliance with the old organization, summer overtook him before he felt free to rejoin his associates in America. He crossed in the same steamer with the Phillipses, arriving July 4, 1841. July 17, 1841, ten days after the Chapmans had returned Lib. 11.119 III. from Hayti. They had embarked for the island on Dec. 28, 1840 (Lib. 11: 3), for the sake of Mr. Henry G. Chapman's health, w
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
conspiracy for the annexation of Texas began to rear its head anew. Southern State legislatures adopted resolves in favor of Lib. 12.49. it which met with a willing reception in Congress, while those in opposition fell under the ban of anti-slavery Lib. 12.50. petitions until the inconsistency became too glaring. Lib. 12.57. Recruiting for the Texan army (even under clerical Lib. 12.55, 63. auspices) went on openly, at the North as at the South, after the invasion of Texas by Mexico in March. When, Lib. 12.51, 53, 59. on April 13, a Representative from New York moved in Congress to suppress the Mexican mission, as being an instrumentality of annexation, Slade of Vermont Wm. Slade. seconded him, declaring that he would not give a snap of his Lib. 12.66. finger for the Union after the annexation of Texas. To Botts of Virginia, offering a preposterous pledge on the John M. Botts. part of the South, not to annex Texas if the abolitionists would disband, Mr. Garrison replied: T
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
Forrest against his English rival Macready, on May 10, 1849, and the year 1850 opened with his trial for this Lib. 20.24. atrocity and his successful defence by John Van Buren. On February 16 he and his Club broke up an anti-Wilmot Nat. A. S. Standard, 10.20. Proviso meeting in New York—a seeming inconsistency, but it was charged against Rynders that he had offered Lib. 20.86. to give the State of New York to Clay in the election of 1844 for $30,000, and met with a reluctant refusal. In March he was arrested for a brutal assault on a gentleman Lib. 20.43. in a hotel, but the victim and the witnesses found it prudent not to appear against a ruffian who did not hesitate to threaten the district-attorney in open court. Meanwhile, the new Whig Administration quite justifiably discharged Rynders from the Custom-house, leaving him free to pose as a saviour of the Union against traitors—a saviour of society against blasphemers and infidels wherever encountered. There was a manifest d
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 18: the irrepressible Conflict.—1858. (search)
xt to the clergy to blow up a spurious revival of religion, became a Lib. 28.70, 78, 83. greater obstacle than ever. The Massachusetts abolitionists, however, relying upon the new Executive of the State, N. P. Banks. again besieged the Legislature for the removal of Judge Loring from an office which he doggedly clung to, in open E. G. Loring. defiance of the Personal Liberty Law of May 21, 1855— Lib. 28.38; ante, p. 416. an unconstitutional statute, as he insisted. Mr. Garrison went in March before the Joint Special Committee having Mar. 2, 1858; Lib. 28.38. the petitions under consideration, with a paper drawn up by himself, and signed also by Samuel May, Sr. and Jr., by Francis Jackson, Wendell Phillips, Theodore Parker, and others. Both the Committee and the Legislature were favorable; an address for removal was voted, and Lib. 28.42, 46, 50. Governor Banks acceded, but with a request, amounting to a condition, that the law of 1855 should be materially Lib. 28.50, 54. mod