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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 221 221 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 33 33 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 18 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 17 17 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 17 17 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 9 9 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for June 20th or search for June 20th in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 11 document sections:

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June 12. The Second Regiment Missouri Volunteers, Col. Siegel, went up the Pacific Railroad from St. Louis, and occupied the line as far as the Gasconade River in order to prevent further damage by the rebels. They met with no opposition from the traitors in that section.--N. Y. Herald, June 20. The steamer City of Alton, with two companies of Col. Oglesby's Regiment and a squad of artillery-men, with two field-pieces, made an excursion from Cairo, Ill., down the Mississippi, five miles below Columbus, Kentucky, to-day. On returning, when near Columbus, some machinery of the boat broke, and the boat drifted ashore. While the machinery was repairing, the captain of the boat, with three of his crew, went ashore and cut down a secession flag which was flying on the shore, and brought it to Cairo. No attempt was made to prevent their taking the flag. Passengers, who have arrived from Columbus since the City of Alton left, say, that great excitement prevailed among the cit
lroad bridge at Martinsburg and the turnpike bridge over the Potomac at Shepherdstown were also destroyed.--Baltimore American, June 15.--(Doc. 264.) Gov. Jackson, of Missouri, having learned that Gen. Lyon was on the way to attack him at Jefferson city, evacuated that place. Soon after sunrise but few of the rebels were to be found in the town. Orders were given by Governor Jackson for the destruction of the Moreau Bridge, four miles down the Missouri, and Gen. Sterling Price attended to the demolition of the telegraph. All the cars and locomotives that could be used were taken by the rebels in their flight, and as fast as they crossed streams they secured themselves from pursuit by burning the bridges. They were quite cautious in concealing their place of destination from the loyal men of Jefferson, but certain remarks made it pretty certain that they were bound for Booneville, forty miles above, and one of the strongest secession towns in the State.--N. Y. Herald, June 20.
d of Colonel Cowdin, left Boston for the seat of war.--(Doc. 252.) Jefferson City, Mo., was occupied by Gen. Lyon, in command of the Union force, who was warmly welcomed by the mass of the citizens. Gen. Lyon there learned that Gov. Jackson and the whole military and civil government of the State had fled to Booneville, forty miles above, and that they have not far from fifteen hundred men there, the most of them armed with their own rifles and shot-guns, six or eight iron cannon, and are throwing up earthworks to protect the town from attack, both by river and by land.--N. Y. Herald, June 20. An experiment with Sawyer's American rifled cannon was made at the Rip Raps, in Hampton Roads. Seven of eleven 48-pound Map of James River. shells exploded a short distance from the rebel camp, on Sewall's Point, and one of them over their intrenchments. It created a sensation among the secessionists. A house near the secession banner displayed a white flag.--N. Y. Times, June 18.
shed symbol of the Union was hailed with delight by the people of Harper's Ferry, and particularly by the women, who flocked to the opposite bank and saluted it by the waving of handkerchiefs and other manifestations of joy.--Baltimore American, June 20. Geneal Joseph H. Lane, of Kansas, was appointed a Brigadier-General in the army of the United States.--N. Y. Tribune, June 20. A reconnoissance of the London and Hampshire Railroad, in Va., was made under Col. Powers, accompanied by tJune 20. A reconnoissance of the London and Hampshire Railroad, in Va., was made under Col. Powers, accompanied by the First Regiment of Connecticut troops. All the bridges were found safe, and the train returned. When two mileseast of Vienna, a man in ambush fired on the-train, wounding George Busbee, of the Connecticut Life Guards. Gen. Tyler was standing beside the wounded man, on an open car. The shot was evidently intended for him. The train was stopped as soon as possible, and the companies were divided to scour the woods, and search the neighboring farm-houses, etc., to make a circuit of a mile. Tw
th a view to taking possession of the Ferry. The news was brought to Washington by Capt. Gardner's First Lieutenant, who was engaged in the action.--N. Y. Times, June 20. This morning, at St. Louis, Mo., a part of Col. Kallman's Regiment of reserve corps were returning from the North Missouri Railroad, when opposite the Recor40 feet above the shaft, making the height 260 feet from the ground. Gov. Andrew and others made eloquent speeches appropriate to the occasion.--Washington Star, June 20. Gen. Lyon issued a strong proclamation, pointing out the determined efforts of the Governor and Legislature to force the State out of the Union, and the unc, when Captain Prince, with a strong body of troops, attacked and routed the State forces, capturing thirty horses and a large quantity of baggage.--N. Y. Herald, June 20. Gen. Lyon left Jefferson City, Mo., for Booneville. He landed four miles below the town and opened a heavy cannonade against the rebels, who retreated and
rce which forded the river at Williamsport were under command of Gen. Thomas, and comprised the two regiments of regulars and about six hundred of the Rhode Islanders. The men waded through the stream generally up to their hips in water, and occasionally up to their arms. Their passage on the occasion is said to have been a very imposing and spirited spectacle. The men dashed into the stream singing Dixie and other popular camp airs with great vim and enthusiasm.--National Intelligencer, June 20. Near Conrad's Ferry, Maryland, the rebels practised upon the Federal troops from the opposite side of the Potomac with three or four 6-pounders. Their fire was returned from the rifle pieces of some twenty picked marksmen, who in the course of their firing brought down one of the enemy's gunners. The distance across is so great, however, that even rifled muskets are of little avail except by chance shots.--N. Y. Evening Post, June 18. The Twenty-Seventh Pennsylvania Regiment, (
less a personage than ex-Governor Joseph Johnson, who was captured in full regimentals. He was brought into Grafton this evening.--Wheeling (Va.) Intelligencer, June 20. The Second Wisconsin Regiment passed through Cleveland, O., for Washington. They were welcomed by a large and enthusiastic crowd of citizens. Before leavi, and in December last. His guilt was fully established, and it was also proved that he had planned the burning of the business part of the town.--N. Y. Express, June 20. Two letters from John Adams, second President of the United States, to Gen. Benjamin Lincoln, of Massachusetts, on the subject of State sovereignty, and thecomposed of 120 carpenters, 70 railroad-track men, 7 railroad and bridge blacksmiths, 6 boat-builders, 2 engineers, and 9 locomotive builders. Boston Transcript, June 20. The Eleventh Anniversary of the Hudson River Baptist Association South, was held with the Mount Olivet Baptist Church, Yonkers. The anniversary sermon was
June 20. To-day Telegraph Engineer Henry I. Rogers, of New York, put in operation, on the western side of the Potomac, his newly invented telegraphic cordage or insulated line, for field operations, and it proved eminently successful, giving entire satisfaction in the manner in which it operated. It is run off reels upon the ground with great rapidity, (as required for instant use,) across streams, through woods, or over any localities. Lines were in extraordinarily short time laid between the Headquarters of General McDowell and two or three of his most advanced camps, and were worked in immediate connection with the telegraph station in the War Depatment. It is worthy of note that the heaviest artillery may run over the Rogers' cordage without damaging its effectiveness in the least. It differs in many respects from the field telegraph used by Louis Napoleon in the Italian war, and embraces many advantages of convenient and certain operation under any possible circumstanc
June 20. A force from Gen. Sherman's command occupied Holly Springs to-day, and destroyed several pieces of trestle-work on the Mississippi Central Railroad. The machinery for repairing and manufacturing arms was removed from Holly Springs to Atlanta, Ga., previous to the evacuation of the place by the rebels. The Paris Constitutionnel, of this date, expressed the opinion that mediation was but a question of time. The cause had gained. More than one hundred provincial journals in France had given in their adhesion to it. The idea had gained ground in England. Such an expression of public opinion in two great countries could not remain without effect, but mediation could not be proposed with the certainty of rejection. It was for the government to seize upon a favorable opportunity. A delegation from the religious society of Progressive Friends appeared before the President, at Washington, for the purpose of presenting a memorial praying him to decree the emancipa
o were under the command of Captain Fletcher, were obliged to fall back to Olathe. H. Pinkney Walker, Her Britannic Majesty's Vice Consul, at Charleston, S. C., having submitted to the Secretary of State satisfactory evidence of his appointment as Acting Consul for the States of North and South-Carolina, is recognized as such by the government of the confederate States.--Lynchburgh Republican, June 18. The rebel ram Atlanta was captured in Warsaw Sound, Ga., by the National monitor Weehawken, under the command of Captain John Rodgers.--(Doc. 18.) Cumberland, Maryland, was occupied during a portion of the day by a party of Imboden's rebel cavalry, who visited the various stores in town, and made large purchases of boots, shoes, and clothing, paying for the same in rebel scrip, at a heavy discount. Several young men belonging to the town joined the rebels and left with them on their departure, which took place at an early hour in the forenoon.--Cumberland Union, June 20.
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