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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 42 42 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 5 5 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 4 4 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 204 BC or search for 204 BC in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Alimentus, M. Ci'ncius tribune of the plebs B. C. 204, proposed in his tribuneship the law known by the name of Cincia Lex de Donis et Muneribus, or Muneralis Lex. (Liv. 34.4 ; Cic. Cato, 4, de Orat. 2.71, ad Att. 1.20; Festus, s. v. Muneralis.) This law was confirmed in the time of Augustus. (Dict. of Ant. s. v. Cincia Lex.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Apollonius RHODIUS (search)
ibe him as a native or, at least, as a citizen of Naucratis. He appears to have been born in the first half of the reign of Ptolemy Euergetes, that is, about B. C. 235, and his most active period falls in the reign of Ptolemy Philopator (B. C. 221-204) and of Ptolemy Epiphanes. (B. C. 204-181.) In his youth he was instructed by Callimachus, but afterwards we find a bitter enmity existing between them. The cause of this hatred has been explained by various suppositions; the most probable of whicB. C. 204-181.) In his youth he was instructed by Callimachus, but afterwards we find a bitter enmity existing between them. The cause of this hatred has been explained by various suppositions; the most probable of which seems to be, that Apollonius, in his love of the simplicity of the ancient poets of Greece and in his endeavour to imitate them, offended Callimachus, or perhaps even expressed contempt for his poetry. The love of Apollonius for the ancient epic poetry was indeed so great, and had such fascinations for him, that even when a youth (e)/fhbos) he began himself an epic poem on the expedition of the Argonauts. When at last the work was completed, he read it in public at Alexandria, but it did not
Asellus 2. Ti. Claudius Asellus, tribune of the soldiers in the army of the consul, C. Claudius Nero, B. C. 207, praetor in B. C. 206, when he obtained Sardinia as his province, and plebeian aedile in B. C. 204. (Liv. 27.41, 28.10, 29.11.) Appian (de Bell. Annib. 37) relates an extraordinary adventure of this Claudius Asellus in B. C. 212.
BOCCHAR 1. A king of the Mauri in the time of MASINISSA, B. C. 204. (Liv. 29.30.)
BOCCHAR 2. A general of Syphax, who sent him against Masinissa, B. C. 204. (Liv. 29.32.) [P.S]
hallenia, which he was indeed obliged to relinquish, in consequence of the treachery of Leontius, but he took advantage of the absence of Dorimachus to make an incursion into Aetolia, advancing to Thermum, the capital city, and plundering it. Dorimachus is mentioned by Livy as one of the chiefs through whom M. Valerius Laevinus, in B. C. 211, concluded a treaty of alliance with Aetolia against Philip, from whom he vainly attempted, in B. C. 210, to save the town of Echinus, in Thessaly. In B. C. 204 he and Scopas were appointed by the Aetolians to draw up new laws to meet the general distress, occasioned by heavy debts, with which the two commissioners themselves were severely burdened. In B. C. 196 Dorimachus was sent to Egypt to negotiate terms of peace with Ptolemy V. (Epiphanes), his mission probably having reference to the conditions of amity between Ptolemy and Antiochus the Great, to whom the Aetolians were now looking for support against Rome. (Plb. 4.3-13, 16-19, 57,58, 67, 7
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), P. Sulpicius Galba (search)
wn of Locris. In the meantime Attalus was driven by Philip out of Phocis, and, on the report that Prusias had invaded his kingdom, he went to Asia. Galba then returned to Aegina, and remained in Greece for several years, without doing any thing worth noticing. The Romans afforded no efficient assistance to the Aetolians, not even after the fall of Hasdrubal, which considerably lessened their care about the safety of Italy. The Aetolians had to act for themselves as well as they could. In B. C. 204 Galba was recalled from Greece, and succeeded by the proconsul, P. Sempronius. In the year following he was appointed dictator for the purpose of holding the comitia, and summoning Cn. Servilius from Sicily. In B. C. 200, the year in which war again broke out, Galba was made consul a second time, and obtained Macedonia as his province. The people at Rome were highly dissatisfied with a fresh war being undertaken, before they had been able to recover from the sufferings of the Carthaginian
Hanno 22. A Carthaginian youth, of noble birth, who was sent out, with a body of 500 horse, to reconnoitre the army of Scipio, when that general first landed in Africa, B. C. 204. Having approached too near the Roman camp he was attacked by their cavalry, and cut to pieces, together with his detachment. (Liv. 29.29.)
asure had the effect of completing the alienation of Masinissa, prince of the Massylians, to whom Sophonisba had been previously promised. Hasdrubal, however, did not regard his enmity in comparison with the friendship of Syphax, whom he not long after instigated to invade the territories of Masinissa, and expel that prince from the whole of his hereditary dominions. (Liv. 29.23, 31; Appian, App. Pun. 10-12; Zonar. 9.11, 12.) Such was the state of affairs when Scipio landed in Africa, in B. C. 204. Hasdrubal, who was at this time regarded as one of the chief citizens in his native state, was immediately placed at the head of the Carthaginian land forces, and succeeded in levying an army of 30,000 foot and 3000 horse, which was quickly joined by Syphax with a force of 50,000 foot and 10,000 horse. The approach of these two powerful armies compelled Scipio to raise the siege of Utica, and establish his camp in a strong position on a projecting headland, while Hasdrubal and Syphax form
He'lvius 1. CN., tribune of the soldiers, was slain, B. C. 204, in battle with the Gauls and Carthaginians, in the territory of Milan. (Liv. 30.18.)
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