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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 22 22 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 5 5 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 206 BC or search for 206 BC in all documents.

Your search returned 22 results in 21 document sections:

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Acidi'nus 1. L. Manlius Acidinus, praetor urbanus in B. C. 210, was sent by the senate into Sicily to bring back the consul Valerius to Rome to hold the elections. (Liv. 26.23, 27.4.) In B. C. 207 he was with the troops stationed at Narnia to oppose Hasdrubal, and was the first to send to Rome intelligence of the defeat of the latter. (Liv. 27.50.) In B. C. 206 he and L. Cornelius Lentulus had the province of Spain entrusted to them with proconsular power. In the following year he conquered the Ausetani and Hergetes, who had rebelled against the Romans in consequence of the absence of Scipio. He did not return to Rome till B. C. 199, but was prevented by the tribune P. Porcius Laeca from entering the city in an ovation, which the senate had granted him. (Liv. 28.38, 29.1-3, 13, 32.7.)
Adherbal 2. A Carthaginian commander under Mago in the second Punic war, who was defeated in a seafight off Carteia, in Spain, by C. Laelius in B. C. 206. (Liv. 28.30.)
Asellus 2. Ti. Claudius Asellus, tribune of the soldiers in the army of the consul, C. Claudius Nero, B. C. 207, praetor in B. C. 206, when he obtained Sardinia as his province, and plebeian aedile in B. C. 204. (Liv. 27.41, 28.10, 29.11.) Appian (de Bell. Annib. 37) relates an extraordinary adventure of this Claudius Asellus in B. C. 212.
Colchas or CO'LICHAS (*Ko/lxas, *Koli/xas), a petty prince of Spain, who ruled over twentyeight cities, and furnished supplies of troops to Scipio against Mago and Hasdrubal in B. C. 206. (Pol. 11.20; Liv. 28.13.) In reward for his services, the Romans increased his dominions (Pol. 21.9); but in B. C. 197 he revolted, and drew away seventeen towns from their allegiance to Rome. The rebellion spread widely through Spain, but was eventually suppressed by M. Porcius Cato, Q. Minucius Thermus, and various other commanders, in B. C. 195. (Liv. 33.21, 26, 44, 34.8-21.) [E.E]
Corbis and ORSUA, two Spanish chiefs, and cousins-german, fought in the presence of Scipio at New Carthage in Spain, B. C. 206, for the sovereignty of the town of Ibis. (Liv. 28.21; V. Max. 9.11, extern. 1.)
's quaestor extraordinary, had he any official rank or station. (Liv. 30.33.) At the battle of Baecula, in the upper valley of the Guadalquivir, he commanded Scipio's left wing, B. C. 208 (Plb. 10.39; Liv. 27.18; Appian, Hispan. 25, 26); and in B. C. 206, a stormingparty, when Illiturgi, on the right bank of the Baetis, was taken (Liv. 28.19, 20); a detachment of the fleet, when Gades was expected to revolt, with which he defeated the Punic admiral Adherbal in the straits (Liv. 28.23, 30); and s of Spain, the Punic Hasdrubal and the Roman Scipio. (Plb. 11.24; Liv. 28.17, 18; Appian, Hispan. 29.) After the Carthaginians had evacuated Spain, Laelius returned with Scipio to Rome, and was present at his consular comitia, in the autumn of B. C. 206. (Plb. 11.33; Liv. 28.38.) The completion of the second Punic war was naturally assigned to the conqueror of Spain; but while Scipio was assembling his forces in Sicily, Laelius, with a portion of the fleet, was despatched to the African coas
Lucre'tius 3. SP. LUCRETIUS, plebeian aedile, B. C. 206, and praetor B. C. 205, received in the latter year, as his province, Ariminum, which was the name then given to the province of Gallia Cisalpina. His imperium was continued to him for the two following years, B. C. 204-203; in the latter of which he had to rebuild Genua, which had been destroyed by Mago. In B. C. 200 he was sent as ambassador to Africa with C. Terentius Varro. (Liv. 28.38, 29.13, 30.1, 11.)
levied in that country, but to which Hanno, who had just arrived in Spain, had lately joined his new army of Carthaginian and African troops. Their combined forces were, however, attacked by M. Silanus, one of the lieutenants of Scipio, and totally defeated; Hanno himself was taken prisoner, while Mago, with a few thousand men, effected his escape, and joined Hasdrubal, the son of Gisco, in the south of Spain. Here they once more succeeded in assembling a numerous army, but the next year (B. C. 206) their decisive defeat by Scipio at Silpia [HASDRUBAL, p. 358] crushed for ever all hope of re-establishing the Carthaginian power in Spain. (Liv. 28.1, 2, 12-16; Plb. 11.20-24; Appian, App. Hisp. 25-27; Zonar. 9.8.) After this battle Mago retired to (Gades, where he shut himself up with the troops under his command; and here he remained long after Hasdrubal had departed to Africa, still keeping his eye upon the proceedings of the Romans, and not without hope of recovering his footing on t
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Matho, Pompo'nius 3. MATHO. M. POMPONIUS, probably son of No. 2. plebeian aedile B. C. 206. gave, with his colleague in the aedileship, a second celebration of the plebeian games. Next year, B. C. 205, he was one of the ambassadors sent to Delphi to make an offering to the god from the booty obtained by the victory over Hannibal; the following year, B. C. 204, he was elected praetor. He obtained Sicily as his province, and was ordered by the senate to inquire into the complaints made by the inhabitants of Locri against P. Scipio. The province was continued to Matho for another year (B. C. 203), and he was appointed to the command of the fleet, which was to protect Sicily, while P. Scipio was prosecuting the war in Africa. (Liv. 28.10, 45, 29.11, 13, 20-22, 30.2, 31.12.)
v. 23.2], 27.21, 36). In B. C. 207 he served in the army of the consul Claudius Nero, and was one of the legates sent to Rome to convey the joyful news of the defeat and death of Hasdrubal; and it was mainly in consequence of his services in this war that he owed his elevation to the consulship in the following year. On his return to Rome he was appointed magister equitum to M. Livius Salinator, who was nominated dictator for the purpose of holding the comitia, and it was at these comitia (B. C. 206) that he was elected consul with L. Veturius Philo, who had served with him in the campaign against Hasdrubal (Liv. 27.51, 28.9, 10 ; Cic. Brut. 14). The consuls received Bruttii as their province, in order to prosecute the war against Hannibal; but their year of office passed over without anything of importance occurring, and Metellus remained in the same province as proconsul, during the following year. At the end of the year he was recalled to Rome, and nominated dictator for the purpos
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