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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 58 58 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 7 7 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 5 5 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 21-22 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University). You can also browse the collection for 210 BC or search for 210 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 28 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 16 (search)
rals, were scattered, some by desertion, others by flight, among the neighbouring states; no force remained which was notable for its numbers or its strength. So much in general for the manner in which under the command and auspices of Publius Scipio the Carthaginians were driven out of Spain in the fourteenth yearAn error corrected by x. 8 and xxxviii. 12, the 14th year of the war being 205 B.C. from the beginning of the war, the fifthLivy had assigned Scipio's arrival in Spain to the year 211 B.C.; XXVI. xix, 11 ff. Consequently he placed the capture of New Carthage in 210 B.C. See Vol. VII. notes on pp. 68, 230, 296; Scullard, 304 ff. after Publius Scipio received his province and army. Not much later Silanus returned to Scipio at Tarraco, reporting the war at an end.Although his readers would here infer that a campaign has now been completed, the historian goes on to include a seemingly impossible range of operations within what remained of the same year, 206 B.C.
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 28 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 38 (search)
Such were the results in Spain under the command and auspices of Publius Scipio. Turning over the province to Lucius Lentulus and Lucius Manlius Acidinus, the propraetors,Both had been praetors (in 211 and 210 B.C. respectively) but were not technically propraetors, having been sent out as private citizens cum imperio, thus having the rank and authority of proconsuls. Such was Scipio's own status. Cf. XXIX. xii. 2; xiii. 7; XXXI. xx. 4 (Vol. IX. p. 59 and note). Scipio himself returned to Rome with ten ships. And when a session of the senate was granted him in the Temple of BellonaCf. ix. 5 and note. outside the city, he set forth his achievements in Spain; how many times he had fought pitched battles; how many towns he had taken by force from the enemy; what tribes he had subjected to the sway of the Roman people. He had gone to Spain, he said, against four generals-in-command,Cf. xxviii. 9, note. against four victorious armies; he had left not a Carthaginian in that
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 29 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 2 (search)
The Roman commanders on their part, Lucius Lentulus and Lucius Manlius Acidinus,Cornelius Lentulus and Manlius had been praetors in 211 and 210 B.C. respectively; XXV. xli. 12; XXVI. xxiii. 1; sent to Spain cum imperio; cf. XXVIII. xxxviii. 1; styled proconsuls without having held the consulship; below, xiii. 7. for fear the war might grow more serious from neglect of the first hostile acts, likewise united their armies, and leading their soldiers through the Ausetanian territory with restraint on an enemy's soil, as though it were friendly, they reached the place where theirB.C. 205 enemies had concentrated and pitched camp three miles away from their camp. At first a vain effort was made through envoys to make them abandon fighting. Then when an attack was suddenly made upon Roman foragers by Spanish horse and from a Roman outpost horsemen were sent to the rescue, there was a cavalry battle with no success for either side worth mentioning. At sunrise on the fo
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 29 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 16 (search)
In like manner another matter which had been passed over in silence for about the same length of time was broached by Marcus Valerius Laevinus, who said it was proper that the sums contributedCf. XXVI. xxxvi, including Laevinus' speech on that occasion and the generous response (ยงยง 11 f.). It was in 210 B.C., a year before the refusal of the colonies named in xv. 5. when he and Marcus Claudius were consuls should at last be repaid to private citizens; and that no one ought to be astonished that a matter in which the credit of the state-was involved should especially concern himself. For in addition to the responsibility that in a way belonged peculiarly to a consul of the year in which the moneys had been contributed, he had also been the first to suggest such contribution, since the treasury was empty and the common people unable to pay a tax.Cf. XXVI. xxxv. 4 ff., 9. This reminder was welcomed by the senators, and bidding the consuls to introduce the measure, they d