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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 18 18 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 3 3 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 3 3 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 3 3 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 2 2 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 1 1 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Boethius, Consolatio Philosophiae 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien). You can also browse the collection for 490 BC or search for 490 BC in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 6 For Xenocrates of Acragas Chariot Race 490 B. C. (search)
Pythian 6 For Xenocrates of Acragas Chariot Race 490 B. C. Listen! for we are again ploughing the field of dark-eyed Aphrodite, or of the Graces, as we approach the sacred navel of the loud-roaring land;where, for the prosperous Emmenids and Acragas on the river, and especially for Xenocrates, a Pythian victor's treasure-house of songs has been built and is ready in the glen of Apollo, rich in gold. It is buffeted by neither the invading onset of winter rain, the loud-roaring cloud's pitiless army, nor the wind that sweeps all kinds of rubble into the depths of the sea. Its facade, shining in pure light,will announce your chariot victory to the speech of men and make it famous—the victory you share with your father and your race, Thrasybulus, won in the vales of Crisa. You keep it on your right hand anduphold the commandment, one of the precepts which they say once in the mountains the son of Philyra enjoined on the powerful son of Peleus, when he was separated from his parents: fir
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 12 For Midas of Acragas Flute-Playing Contest 490 B. C. (search)
Pythian 12 For Midas of Acragas Flute-Playing Contest 490 B. C. I beseech you, splendor-loving city, most beautiful on earth, home of Persephone; you who inhabit the hill of well-built dwellings above the banks of sheep-pasturing Acragas: be propitious, and with the goodwill of gods and men, mistress,receive this victory garland from Pytho in honor of renowned Midas, and receive the victor himself, champion of Hellas in that art which once Pallas Athena discovered when she wove into music the dire dirge of the reckless Gorgons which Perseus heardpouring in slow anguish from beneath the horrible snakey hair of the maidens, when he did away with the third sister and brought death to sea-girt Seriphus and its people. Yes, he brought darkness on the monstrous race of Phorcus, and he repaid Polydectes with a deadly wedding-present for the longslavery of his mother and her forced bridal bed; he stripped off the head of beautiful Medusa, Perseus, the son of Danae, who they say was conceiv