hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 47 47 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 34 34 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 9 9 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 8 8 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 8 8 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 5 5 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 4 4 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 4 4 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. 2 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register. You can also browse the collection for 1728 AD or search for 1728 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 47 results in 16 document sections:

1 2
ibson, being convicted of enterteyneing some of the studts. contrary to law, is sentenced to be admonished and to pay a fine of forty shillings in money. And he stands committed until it be pd. Another tavern, somewhat famous for many years, stood on the southerly side of Mount Auburn Street, about midway between Brighton and Dunster Streets. It seems to have been first opened in 1726, by John Stedman, grandson of Robert Stedman, the former owner of the same estate. He was succeeded, in 1728, by his widow, Sarah Stedman, and she, in 1734, by her son Ebenezer Stedman, who died Sept. 13, 1785, aged 76. Time would fail me should I attempt to enumerate and describe all the inn-holders who have flourished in Cambridge. During the first century after the foundation of the town, licenses were granted to the following named persons (and perhaps others) besides those who have already been mentioned:— Daniel Champney, 1691. William Russell, 1696-1715. Samuel Phipps, 1707-1709.
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 15: ecclesiastical History. (search)
be improved by the town till such time as the scholars have occasion for the same, and no longer. Notwithstanding this enlargement of the seating capacity of the house, the people on the westerly side of Menotomy River desired better accommodation, and as early as May 10, 1725, petitioned the town to consent that they might become a separate precinct. The town withheld its consent, on the ground that near one half of said inhabitants had not signed the petition. The request was renewed in 1728, but was not successful until four years later. The General Court having dismissed the petition of James Cutler and others for incorporation as a religious precinct, Nov. 3, 1732, a new petition, slightly differing in form, was presented soon afterwards; which was granted Dec. 27, 1732, and Menotomy became a precinct, with substantially the same bounds which were assigned to it when it was incorporated as a town in 1807. This separation appears to have been entirely amicable, and a spirit
gs, Joseph Hicks, John Manning, John Peirce, Joseph Smith, Nathaniel Sparhawk, John Squire, Thomas Stacy, John Stedman. In 1707, John Comce was killed, and Benjamin Mussey captived Sergeants William Cheever and Eliazar Parker served in 1722; Zechariah Hicks, clerk, and John Manning, in 1724; Sergeant Simon Holden, in 1725, and John Oldham, in 1740 Next after Colonel Goffe, William Brattle was for many years the most prominent military character. He attained the rank of Major as early as 1728, when he was only twenty-two years old; Colonel, before March, 1739; Adjutant-general in 1758; Brigadier-general, as early as 1760, and Major-general of the militia throughout the Province in 1771. During the French War, which commenced in 1753 (though not formally declared until 1756) and continued until 1763, he was active and energetic in the raising of troops and the general administration of military affairs in the Province; but in the Army Cambridge seems to have had no officer of high
in 1700. Jona. Remington, 1714, 1715, 1717, 1718, 1722-1728. Edmund Goffe, 1716, 1720, 1721. Andrew Bordman, 171929, 1730, 1732, 1735, 1736. Francis Foxcroft, Jr., 1725, 1728, 1734. Ephraim Frost, 1725, 1727, 1730, 1735. Nathaniel Bowman, 1726. Solomon Prentice [2d], 1728. Gershom Davis, 1728, 1729, 1731, 1732. John Cutter, 1728, 1736, 1741.1728, 1729, 1731, 1732. John Cutter, 1728, 1736, 1741. William Brattle, 1729, 1731-1733, 1748-1757, 1766-1772. Joseph Adams, 1729, 1731, 1732, 1737, 1738. Isaac Watson, 1728, 1736, 1741. William Brattle, 1729, 1731-1733, 1748-1757, 1766-1772. Joseph Adams, 1729, 1731, 1732, 1737, 1738. Isaac Watson, 1731, 1737, 1738. Samuel Danforth, 1733, 1734, 1737– 1739. Henry Dunster, 1733, 1734. Samuel Smith, 1733. Benjam Daniel Dana, 1720, 1725. John Cutter, 1721, 1724, 1727, 1728, 1736, 1741. Samuel Bowman, 1722-1724, 1727, 1737-1743, Ephraim Frost, 1725, 1726, 1730, 1735. Samuel Andrew, 1728. Gershom Davis, 1728, 1729, 1731, 1732. Joseph Adams,1728, 1729, 1731, 1732. Joseph Adams, 1729, 1731, 1732, 1737, 1738. Andrew Bordman, Jr., 1730. William Brown, 1730. Isaac Watson, 1731. Henry Dunster
. 1768; Jonathan, b. 23 July 1710, grad. H. C. 1728, Chief Justice and Lieut.-governor of Nova Scotstered; Edmund. b. 5 Mar. 1709-10, grad. H. C. 1728, merchant in Portsmouth N. H.; Thaddeus, b. 2 Sas, b.——, d. unm. between 3 Ap. 1726 and 1 Ap. 1728; Dorothy, b. 1702, m. Solomon Page of Hampton, rchester; Ebenezer, b. 7 Dec. 1710, grad, H. C. 1728, ord. colleague with his father 2 Jan. 1734, an Simon, s. of Stephen (4), was here as early as 1728, and by w. Abigail had Elizabeth, bap. 12 Sept.5. 7. Thaddeus, s. of John (5), grad. H. C. 1728, and was the earliest graduate who survived untncer, by w. Elizabeth, had William, b.——, H. C. 1728, a Captain, d. s. p. before 22 June 1752; Mary,rah d. 4 Oct. 1700, and he m. Abigail——, who d. 1728 at Woburn, a. 71. 7. David, s. of David (5),. Elizabeth Phipps 25 Dec. 1715; she d. 7 Jan. 1728-9, and he m. Mary Whiting 21 Oct. 1731. His ch Locke of Woburn 15 June 1726, and had Joel, b. 1728; Sarah, b. 1732; Ruhama, b. 1733. Ben-Jamin th[8 m
ncil, and d. at Milton 24 Jan. 1771, a. 63; Sarah, b. 22 Ap. 1709, m. Byfield Lyde, Esq., 17 Aug. 1727, and d. 5 Oct. 1768; Jonathan, b. 23 July 1710, grad. H. C. 1728, Chief Justice and Lieut.-governor of Nova Scotia, where he d. 29 Mar. 1776, leaving son Daniel, a merchant in Halifax, d. at Boulogne, France, 17 Nov. 1841, a. 78 5 Nov. 1729, and d. 30 May 1775; Francis, b. 10 June 1705, d. unm. 1750, and his brother William, of Camb., administered; Edmund. b. 5 Mar. 1709-10, grad. H. C. 1728, merchant in Portsmouth N. H.; Thaddeus, b. 2 Sept. 1712; William, b. 2 Sept. 1715; Martha, b. 8 Sept. 1718, m. Samuel Bridge, 27 Ap. 1738. Joseph the f. resided , m. Samuel Belcher 27 Dec. 1726. Martha the m. d. 1 Sep. 1708, and her husb. m. Margaret Odlin 13 Jan. 1708-9 and had Abigail, b. 8 May 1710. Ichabod the f. d. 1728. His w. Margaret and his five children survived. 7. William, m. Deborah, wid. of Thomas Squire, 11 Nov. 1703, and had William, b. 24 Nov. 1704; Josiah, b. 22 O
eb. 1773. His first wife was Elizabeth, dau. of his predecessor, Rev. Thomas Blowers, whom he m. 1 Oct. 1730; she had one son Thomas, and d. 13 Jan. 1731-2, a. 19. He then m. Thankful Pickens of Lynn 1733, and had Richard, a second Richard, Israel, Sarah, Elizabeth, and Thomas. His wid. Thankful d. 31 July 1777, a. 71. (Stone's Beverly.) 10. Daniel, s. of Daniel (7), m. Tabitha Hancock 4 Sept. 1723, and had Daniel, bap. 19 Ap. 1724; Dorcas, bap. 22 Aug. 1725, d. young; Mary, bap. 21 Ap. 1728; Dorcas, bap. 20 Aug. 1732; Nathaniel, bap. 1 Dec. 1734; Tabitha, bap. 5 June 1737, d. young; Ebenezer, bap. 29 Ap. 1739; Tabitha, bap. 19 July 1741, perh. m. Samuel Hancock of Wells, 12 Sept. 1774; Thomas, bap. 24 May 1747. Daniel the f. d., and his wife Tabitha was appointed administratrix 20 Ap. 1747. 11. Solomon, s. of Daniel (7), m. Elizabeth Chamberlin 8 May 1723, who d. suddenly 21 Feb. 1736-7, and he m. Abigail, wid. of Geo. Macsparran, 1738; his chil. were Elizabeth, b. 4 Nov.
ade of Medford (by his first wife), 5 Ap. 1692; after her death he in. Ruth, wid. of Joshua Eaton of Reading,—marriage contract signed 23 Nov. 1719. His children were (by first wife), Heny, b. 17 July, 1680; Elizabeth, b. 22 Feb. 1681-2, d. young; and by second wife, Jonathan, b. 1695, d. unm. 11 April 1742, aged 47; Elizabeth, b. about 1699, m. Philip Carteret (or De Carteret), and d. 25 Jan. 1787, aged 87, as inscribed on her gravestone; Thomas, b.——, d. unm. between 3 Ap. 1726 and 1 Ap. 1728; Dorothy, b. 1702, m. Solomon Page of Hampton, N. H. (prob. the graduate H. C. 1729), 13 Ap. 1732, and d. 13 Oct. 1741, leaving five children; David, b. 1705. Jonathan the f. d. 1725. his w. Ruth m. Lieut. Amos Marrett 22 Nov. 1732, and after his death, Peter Hayes of Stoneham, pub. 30 Sept. 1742. 3. Henry, s. of Jonathan (2), m. Martha, dau. of Jason Russell, 25 Feb. 1707-8, and had Martha, b. 7 Feb. 1708-9, m. Edward Dickson 18 Mar. 1730-31; Maryb. 7 July, 1712, m. Amos Marrett 21 Sep<
merchant in Boston, a member of the Council, d. of apoplexy 1 Aug. 1763, and bequeathed his fortune to his nephew John, afterwards Governor; Elizabeth, b. 5 Feb. 1704-5, m. Rev. Jonathan Bowman of Dorchester; Ebenezer, b. 7 Dec. 1710, grad, H. C. 1728, ord. colleague with his father 2 Jan. 1734, and d. 28 Jan. 1740; Lucy, b. 20 Ap. 1713, m. Rev. Nicholas Bowes of Concord; after his death she m. Rev. Samuel Cooke of Menot. and d. 21 Sept. 1768; her dau. Lucy m. Rev. Jonas Clark (who succeeded bap. 26 Ap. 1730. Joseph the f. was perhaps the same who m. Elizabeth Russell of Camb. 11 June 1729. He removed to Westminster in 1737, where he was a prominent citizen, and d. 30 Nov. 1768. 11. Simon, s. of Stephen (4), was here as early as 1728, and by w. Abigail had Elizabeth, bap. 12 Sept. 1736, d. young; Simon, b. 6 Jan. 1737-8, d. 7 May 1752; Elizabeth, b. 1739; Nathaniel, bap. 1 Aug. 1742; Abigail, bap. 7 Oct. 1744; Charles, b. 19 June 1746, d. 5 June 1768; Thomas, b. 8 May 1749; Ha
b. 14 June 1721; Elias, b. 24 Ap. 1723, m. Ruth Cheney 7 Nov. 1740; Esther, b. 14 Nov. 1725, m. Jonathan Brown, Jr., 25 Jan. 1749-50, d. 14 July 1802; Lydia, b. 6 Nov. 1727, m. Micah Whitney of Natick 11 Nov. 1747; Susanna, b. 22 Sept. 1729, m. Samuel Soden of Camb. 16 Dec. 1755; Ebenezer, b. 1 Mar. 1731-2; Josiah, b. 3 Oct. 1734. Of this numerous family it is remarkable that all lived to maturity and were married. Joseph the f. d. 6 July 1755. 7. Thaddeus, s. of John (5), grad. H. C. 1728, and was the earliest graduate who survived until the present century commenced. He outlived all his classmates about nine years, and was the eldest living graduate about five years. He taught school at Woodstock a short time after leaving college, but was soon appointed by Gov. Belcher as his private Secretary; he was appointed Deputy Naval Officer 1731, Deputy Secretary of the Province in April 1734, and Clerk of the Middlesex Courts Feb. 1735-1736, which last office, by which he was best
1 2