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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 608 608 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 21 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 20 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 14 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 9 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
vidence had been obtained by a committee appointed by the Confederate Senate. At the head of this committee was that pure minded, eminent Christian gentleman, Judge J. W. C. Watson, of Holly Springs, Mississippi. The volume of testimony gathered from a large number of returned prisoners, men of undoubted veracity, we were invited, by the kindness of Judge Watson, to inspect. It was in the hands of the printer in Richmond when the memorable fire occured, at the time of its evacuation in April, 1865, and was unfortunately consumed in the great conflagration. But Camp Douglas, Rock Island, Johnson's Island, Elmira, Fort Delaware, and other Federal prisons, could they find a tongue, would tell a tale of horror that should forever silence all clamor about Libby Prison and Belle Isle and Andersonville. At Fort Delaware the misrule and suffering were probable less than at any other; yet whoever wishes to get a glimpse at the Federal prisons in their best estate, and under the control of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Colonel D. T. Chandler, (search)
r from Judge Ould, in the Saint Louis Globe-Democrat, which so ably refutes the charge made against him on the faith of a garbled letter of his, and brings out other points so clearly, that we give it entire except the introductory paragraphs: Richmond, Va., October 5th, 1875. * * * * * * * * I will now give the history and contents of the letter which S. produces as the sole proof of my premeditated complicity in the murder of Federal prisoners. When Richmond was evacuated in April, 1865, this letter was found among the scattered debris of General Winder's office. The first time I ever saw it published in full was in the Washington Chronicle, a well-known Republican paper, of the date of August 25, 1868. It was then and there made the basis of a savage attack upon me. Of course, everything in the letter which could be damaging to me was set forth. The latter part of it was printed in italics. I will give the letter as it appeared in the Chronicle, and beneath it I wil
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
Cavalry, General J. H. Morgan's command. Sworn to before me this third day of March, 1876. will. A. Harris, Notary Public in and for San Bernardino county, State of California. The following statement of Major Robert Stiles of Richmond Virginia, will be received by his large circle of friends and acquaintances as the testimony of a gentleman without fear and without reproach. Statement of Major Robert Stiles. I was a prisoner of war at Johnson's Island and Fort Lafayette from April to October, 1865, having been captured at Sailor's creek. During this time I did not suffer seriously to my own person from bad treatment, but saw and heard no little of the suffering of others. The Southern field officers were released from Johnson's Island in May or June, but I was held a prisoner because I declined to take the somewhat remarkable oath propounded to us, and refused to give in addition my word of honor that I would say nothing against the Government of the United States
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
uly 24, 1861. Secretary of War: Leroy P. Walker (Ala.), Feb. 21, 1861 Secretary of War: Judah P. Benjamin (La.), Sept. 17, 1861. Secretary of the Navy: Stephen R. Mallory (Fla.), Feb. 25, 1861. Secretary of the Treasury: Charles G. Memminger (S. C.), Feb. 21, 1861. Attorney-General: Judah P. Benjamin, Feb. 25, 1861 Attorney-General: Thomas Bragg, (Ala.), Sept. 17, 1861. Postmaster-General: J. H. Reagan (Texas), March 6, 1861. Ii. Reorganization. (Feb. 22, 1862, to April, 1865.) Secretary of State: R. M. T. Hunter, July 24, 1861 Secretary of State: Judah P. Benjamin, March 17, 1862. Secretary of War: Judah P. Benjamin, Sept. 17, 1861 Secretary of War: George W. Randolph, March 17, 1862 Secretary of War: Gustavus W. Smith, acting, Nov. 17, 1862 Secretary of War: James A. Seddon, Nov. 20, 1862 Secretary of War: John C. Breckinridge, Jan. 28, 1865. Secretary of the Navy : Stephen R. Mallory. Secretary of the Treasury: C. G. Memminger Secr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Confederate Government at Montgomery. (search)
, of the crop of 1861, 2,000,000 more bales might be obtained afterward. By using this cotton as security, or shipping it abroad, he maintained the finances of the Confederate States could at once be placed on a solid basis. His plan met with much favor, but was opposed by the administration and was not carried through. Money for the long war was to be raised by loans from Confederate citizens on bonds supplemented by the issue of Treasury notes and by a duty on exported cotton. In April, 1865, after the collapse of the Confederacy, Mr. Barnwell, who had steadfastly supported Mr. Davis in the Confederate Senate, met the writer at Greenville, S. C., where Governor Magrath had summoned the Legislature of the State to assemble. There, in conversation, Mr. Barnwell explicitly expressed his judgment in the following words: Mr. Davis never had any policy; he drifted, from the beginning to the end of the war. For practical regret at the issue of the secession movement, the time ha
e as firm as a rock, as immovably rooted as one of the gigantic live-oaks of his native country. When I asked him one day if he expected to be attacked soon, he laughed and said: No; the enemy's cavalry are afraid to show their noses beyond their infantry. Nor did the Federal cavalry ever achieve any results in that region until the ten or fifteen thousand crack cavalry of General Sheridan came to ride over the two thousand men, on starved and broken-down horses, of General Fitz Lee, in April, 1865. From Virginia, in the dark winter of 1864, Hampton was sent to oppose with his cavalry the advance of General Sherman, and the world knows how desperately he fought there on his natale solum. More than ever before it was sabre to sabre, and Hampton was still in front. When the enemy pressed on to Columbia he fell back, fighting from street to street, and so continued fighting until the thunderbolt fell in South Carolina, as it had fallen in Virginia at Appomattox, and the struggle e
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Flight and capture of Jefferson Davis. (search)
. I have read the slip you send me twice carefully over; and if there is a single truth in it, outside of the great historical facts incidentally referred to, of the fall of Richmond and the surrender of General Lee, I have not discovered it. On the contrary, it is made up of statements which are utterly void of truth. I will call attention to some of them. The statement has been made by General Wilson, as it has been made in many other newspaper articles, that On the first Sunday in April, 1865, while seated in St. Paul's church, in Richmond, Jefferson Davis received a telegram from Lee announcing the fall of Petersburg, the partial destruction of his army, and the immediate necessity of flight. On that point I make this statement: On the Sunday referred to, I went by the War Department on my way to church. When at the department I was informed of two dispatches just received from General Lee, stating briefly the circumstances which made it necessary for him to withdraw his a
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. (search)
How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. Major General James Harrison Wilson. On the first Sunday of April, 1865, while seated in St. Paul's Church, in Richmond, Jefferson Davis received a telegram from Lee, announcing the fall of Petersburg, the partial destruction of his army, and the immediate necessity for flight. Although he could not have been entirely unprepared for this intelligence, it appears that he did not receive it with self-possession or dignity; but with tremulous and nervous haste, like a weak man in the hour of misfortune, he left the house of worship and hurried home, where he and his personal staff and servants spent the rest of the day in packing their personal baggage. At nightfall everything was in readiness; even the gold then remaining in the Treasury, not exceeding in all forty thousand dollars, was packed among the baggage, In a recent article Mr. Reagan says: If it is meant by this statement simply that the money in the Treasury (gold and all) was tak
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Stuart in camp and field. (search)
brief campaign of Mine Run-and the furious wrestle between Lee and Grant in the Wilderness, in May, 1864. When General Grant moved toward Spottsylvania Court-House, it was Stuart who, according to Northern historians, so obstructed the roads as to enable General Lee to interpose his army at this important point. Had this not been effected, Richmond, it would seem, must have fallen; Stuart thus having the melancholy glory of prolonging, for an additional year, the contest, ending only in April, 1865. His death speedily followed. General Sheridan turned against him his own system, organized on the Chickahominy, in June, 1862. The Federal horse pushed past Lee's army to surprise Richmond; Stuart followed in haste, with such small force of cavalry as he could collect on the instant. The collision took place at Yellow tavern, near Richmond, and in the engagement Stuart was mortally wounded, and, two or three days afterward, expired. The death of the famous cavalryman produced a
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 15: evacuation of Richmond and the Petersburg lines.--retreat and surrender. (search)
n such manner as shall be mutually approved by the relative authorities: R. E. Lee, General. W. H. Taylor, Lieutenant Colonel and Acting Adjutant General. Charles S. Venable, Lieutenant Colonel and Acting Adjutant General. Charles Marshall, Lieutenant Colonel and Acting Adjutant General. H. E. Peyton, Lieutenant Colonel and Inspector General. Giles Brooke, Major and A. A. Surgeon General. H. S. Young, Acting Adjutant General. Done at Appomattox Court House, Va., the ninth (9th) day of April, 1865. The parole was countersigned as follows: The above-named officers will not be disturbed by United States authorities as long as they observe their parole and the laws in force where they may reside. George H. Sharpe, General and Assistant Provost Marshal. was still loved by his people. It was a demonstration in which men forgot their own sorrow and gave way to the glory and gratitude of the past. They adored him most, not in the glare of his brilliant victories, but in the hour of hi
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