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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 226 226 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 35 35 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 20 20 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 12 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 4 4 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for 1883 AD or search for 1883 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 14: battle and capture of Fort Henry by the Navy. (search)
on away. Every charge you fire from one of those guns cost the government about eight dollars. If your shots fall short you encourage the enemy. If they reach home you demoralize him, and get the worth of your money. After commending all to the care of Divine Providence he left us, and repaired on board the Cincinnati, which was his flag ship at that time. During the night of the 5th, or morning of the Rear Admiral R. N. Stembel, commander of the Cincinnati. (from a portrait taken in 1883.) 6th, a heavy rain fell, which very much retarded the movements of the army, and made the roads so heavy that they did not succeed in reaching the scene of action until after the fort had surrendered. The naval forces, after waiting until 11 o'clock A. M., got under way and steamed up the river. Arriving at the island chute, the line of battle was formed, the Essex on the extreme right, the Cincinnati, with Flag-officer Foote on board, on our left, the Carondelet on her left, and the