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Meeting House (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
her bridge until the one from East Cambridge to Charlestown was finished in 1786, soon to be followed by West Boston Bridge in 1793, which wrought a great change in the facing of Cambridge toward Boston. Throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries the true river front of Cambridge was at the Great Bridge. The filling in of Back Bay, the westward expansion of Boston, and the completion of Harvard Bridge in 1890, have been steps toward restoring the ancient frontage. The first Meeting-House stood on the southwest corner of Dunster and Mount Auburn streets. It was soon found too small and flimsy, and in 1650 a better one was built at the southwest corner of the College Yard, nearly on the site of Dane Hall. From 1650 to 1833 that spot was occupied by the Meeting-House of the First Parish. The space between the sites of Church and Garden streets was inclosed as a graveyard or God's Acre in 1636. Of next importance to the church, in a New England town, was the Town-House.
Cambridgeport (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
hatch. Before the end of 1635, there were at least eighty-five houses in the New Town. Eastward from Holyoke (then called Crooked) Street ran Back Lane, while Braintree Street, deflecting southeastward, took the name of Field Lane. These two lanes, meeting near the present junction of Bow and Arrow streets, formed the highway into the Neck, running eastward as far as the site of Washington Square. Under the somewhat vague phrase, The Neck, was comprised the territory now covered by Cambridgeport and East Cambridge. It was divided into arable lots, and parceled among the inhabitants in severalty. The western part was cut up into small portions of from one to three acres, but to the eastward of the site of Hancock Street it was granted in large farms of from twenty to sixty acres. This region of the Neck was marked off and protected by a paling which ran—to use modern names—from Holyoke Place to Gore Hall, and thence to the line between Cambridge and Somerville at Line Street ne
St. Giles's church (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 1
my from whom most was to be feared,—not the Indians, but the war-ships of King Charles. The transfer of the charter, which practically metamorphosed a powerful trading company into a semi-independent republic, was not likely to be regarded with favor by the Crown. In point of fact, we know that by 1635 Charles was intending to suppress the Company. He would very likely have carried out his intention, if affairs in Scotland had not suddenly absorbed his energies. After the tumult at St. Giles's church in Edinburgh in 1637, when the old woman threw her camp-stool at the bishop's head, the charter of Massachusetts was safe for many a year to come; but before that time the settlers had much reason for regarding it as in danger. The situation of Watertown was a little too far inland for convenience, but a position on Charles River somewhat lower than Watertown would be far less accessible to war-ships— either English or foreign—than the peninsulas of Boston and Charlestown, while by <
Watertown (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
s of Charlestown, Boston, Dorchester, Roxbury, and Watertown. Among these places Boston was clearly marked forfor regarding it as in danger. The situation of Watertown was a little too far inland for convenience, but a position on Charles River somewhat lower than Watertown would be far less accessible to war-ships— either Engls forest ran the trail or path from Charlestown to Watertown, nearly coinciding with the crooked line Kirkland-pallysadoe aboute the Newe Towne. Here the men of Watertown protested, and refused to pay their share of the try to have resisted, did these village Hampdens of Watertown utter their memorable protest. In the summer ofartford, while the congregations of Dorchester and Watertown founded Windsor and Wethersfield. The exodus fromon. In 1754, the boundary between Cambridge and Watertown was carried westward about half a mile from its fol, who picked up the child of Goodman Jennison, of Watertown, and kissed and fondled it, and a few hours afterw
Quincy (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ilding of a wooden palisade from Ash Street to Jarvis Field furnished the occasion for the first great assertion of the principles of constitutional law and free government in New England. Two years before the issue of that illegal writ of ship money, which it is John Hampden's glory to have resisted, did these village Hampdens of Watertown utter their memorable protest. In the summer of 1632, a congregation from Braintree in Essex came over to Massachusetts and began to settle near Mount Wollaston, where they left the name of Braintree on the map; but in August they removed to the New Town, where Braintree Street took its name from them. Their pastor, the eminent Thomas Hooker, who had been obliged to flee to Holland, arrived in the course of the next year. This accession raised the population of the New Town to something like 500 persons. But the new-comers were not satisfied with things as they found them, and by 1634 we begin to hear them talk about going elsewhere. Some b
Hartford (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
t. No other ground of difference between them and their neighbors was nearly so important as this, but both Hooker and Governor Winthrop were great men, and too discreet to indulge in a controversy that would breed schism and bitterness. Some objections were raised to removing a candlestick, but the candlestick would not stay. In the course of the year 1635 began the exodus from the Charles River to the Connecticut. In June, 1636, Mr. Hooker went with most of his congregation and founded Hartford, while the congregations of Dorchester and Watertown founded Windsor and Wethersfield. The exodus from the New Town was so great that of the families dwelling there in January, 1635, not more than eleven are known to have remained until the end of 1636. But the places of those who departed were filled without delay. In the autumn of 1635, Rev. Thomas Shepard arrived from England with his congregation, and forthwith the meeting-house and the dwellings of the old company were occupied b
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
he Charlestown highway (Kirkland Street) and Braintree Street, the name of which was changed to Harvard Street. A fence and gate between the college yard and the graveyard, near the site of the present flagstaff, served to keep out of the village the cattle that grazed on the Common. Across Harvard Street (near Linden) was the east gate of the town; and where the palisade crossed the Watertown highway (Brattle Street) at Ash Street was the west gate. In 1639, the first printing-press in America north of the city of Mexico was set up by Stephen Daye, at the west corner of Dunster Street and Harvard Square. Among its earliest productions were Peirce's New England Almanack, and the Bay Psalm Book, and there was afterward printed that monument of labor, Eliot's Indian Bible. The complaints of insufficient land led to extensive grants of territory, until from 1644 to 1655 Cambridge attained enormous dimensions, including the whole areas of Brighton and Newton on the south side of th
Bedford, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
re. Among its earliest productions were Peirce's New England Almanack, and the Bay Psalm Book, and there was afterward printed that monument of labor, Eliot's Indian Bible. The complaints of insufficient land led to extensive grants of territory, until from 1644 to 1655 Cambridge attained enormous dimensions, including the whole areas of Brighton and Newton on the south side of the river, and on the other hand in a northwesterly direction the whole or large parts of Arlington, Lexington, Bedford, and Billerica. In 1655, this vast area was first curtailed by cutting off the parts beyond Lexington. Then in 1688, Newton, which had been known as Cambridge Village and sometimes as New Cambridge, became an independent township under name of Newtown. The Lexington area was known as Cambridge Farms, but the founding of a church there in 1696 was the preliminary to separation, and in 1713 Cambridge Farms became a distinct town by the name of Lexington. In 1754, the boundary between C
Linden, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
own as Creek Lane, and it was continued in a southeasterly sweep into Boylston Street by Marsh Lane, afterwards called Eliot Street. On the north side of Braintree Street, opposite Dunster, and thence eastward about as far as opposite the site of Linden, stood a row of six houses, and at their back was the ancient forest. Through this forest ran the trail or path from Charlestown to Watertown, nearly coinciding with the crooked line Kirkland-Mason-Brattle-Elmwood-Mount Auburn; this was the firsname of which was changed to Harvard Street. A fence and gate between the college yard and the graveyard, near the site of the present flagstaff, served to keep out of the village the cattle that grazed on the Common. Across Harvard Street (near Linden) was the east gate of the town; and where the palisade crossed the Watertown highway (Brattle Street) at Ash Street was the west gate. In 1639, the first printing-press in America north of the city of Mexico was set up by Stephen Daye, at the
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
likely have begun the literary activity of New England, with some of those ponderous verses of Mrs of the neatest and best compacted towns in New England, having many fair structures, with many hanaker cattle from the wild beasts. Wood's New England's Prospect, p. 45. The common grazing-l36. Of next importance to the church, in a New England town, was the Town-House. In early times tf constitutional law and free government in New England. Two years before the issue of that illegalpublique hand of the state added the rest. New England's First Fruits, p. 12. Most of the clergymen who came to New England were graduates of Cambridge, and as soon as the New Town was designatmong its earliest productions were Peirce's New England Almanack, and the Bay Psalm Book, and there ever receding frontier. The settlers of New England dreaded heresy far more than they dreaded Ion which all the Congregational churches of New England were able to stand for the next four genera
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