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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 18 Browse Search
Plato, Republic 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 3 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 3 3 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. 2 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 2 2 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908 2 2 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 8, April, 1909 - January, 1910 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Plato, Republic. You can also browse the collection for 1908 AD or search for 1908 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Plato, Republic, Book 5, section 468a (search)
“But now what of the conduct of war? What should be the attitude of the soldiers to one another and the enemy? Am I right in my notions or not?” “Tell me what notions,” he said. “Anyone of them who deserts his post, or flings away his weapons,The terms are technical. Cf. Laws 943 D ff., Lipsius, Das attische Recht(1908), ii. pp. 452 ff. or is guilty of any similar act of cowardice, should be reduced to the artisan or farmer class, should he not?” “By all means.” “And anyone who is taken alive by the enemyEI)S TOU\S POLEMI/OUS: technical. Cf. inscription in Bulletin de corr. hellénique, xii. p. 224, n. 1TW=N A(LO/NTWN EI)S TOU\S POLEMI/OUS. we will make a present of to his
Plato, Republic, Book 5, section 473c (search)
nd iv. 27. It was a standardized topic of compliment to princes in Themistius, Julian, the Panegyrici Latini, and many modern imitators. Among the rulers who have been thus compared with Plato's philosophic king are Marcus Aurelius, Constantine, Arcadius, James I., Frederick the Great, and Napoleon. There is a partial history of the commonplace in T. Sinko's Program, Sententiae Platonicae de philophis regnantibus fata quae fuerint, Krakow, 1904, in the supplementary article of Karl Praechter, Byzantinische Zeitschrift, xiv. (1905) pp. 4579-491, and in the dissertation of Emil Wolff, Francis Bacons Verhaltnis zu Platon, Berlin, 1908, pp. 60 ff.
Plato, Republic, Book 6, section 505c (search)
nce of the good they turn about and talk to us as if we knew it? For they say it is the knowledge of the good,There is no “the” in the Greek. Emendations are idle. Plato is supremely indifferent to logical precision when it makes no difference for a reasonably intelligent reader. Cf. my note on Phileb. 11 B-C in Class. Phil. vol. iii. (1908) pp. 343-345. as if we understood their meaning when they utterFQE/GCWNTAI logically of mere physical utterance (Cf. Theaet. 157 B), not, I think, as Adam says, of high-sounding oracular utterance. the word ‘good.'” “Most true,” he said. “Well, are those who define the good as pleasure infected with any less confusionLit.