hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 539 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 88 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 58 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 54 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 54 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 44 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 39 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 38 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 38 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 36 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874.. You can also browse the collection for Americans or search for Americans in all documents.

Your search returned 27 results in 16 document sections:

1 2
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section second: European Travels and studies. (search)
Section second: European Travels and studies. Sails for Europe Travels and studies in France, Germany, Italy He sailed for England, with letters of introduction from Judge story and many distinguished Americans, to the most eminent jurists and public men of Europe. Judge story, in particular, had requested Lord Brougham. then Lord Chancellor, to afford him the means of witnessing most advantageously, the proceedings of the Courts of Westminster Hall, and observe the workings of the British Constitution in every department of the Government. It is not surprising that with his high attainments, and with such letters, he was warmly received by the great men of England, and everywhere treated as a companion, and a guest. He was invited to a seat on the bench in every court he entered. There was not a book, manuscript, or authority in a public or private library of England, that was not at his command; everybody was ready to assist him in his more recondite researches;
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Sixth: the interval of illness and repose. (search)
day he was cupped on the spine, and three-quarters of his time was spent on his bed or sofa, sleeping whenever he could, but finding his chief recreation in reading; although he would frequently attend the public lectures at the College, on History and Literature. Ix. No portion of the earth approaches nearer to the ideal of the invalid's paradise, than the south of France. Bordering on the Mediterranean, That tideless sea, Which ceaseless rolls eternally; whose waters vary in temperature only one or two degrees in the year, and whose climate combines all the soft and genial influences so completely embraced in the term mezzo giorno, and far away from the fire-life Americans lead, he was now on the road to substantial recovery. After one more rapid dash through Italy, he reported himself in Paris to Dr. Brown-Sequard, who now pronounced him well. For a month he took the seabaths at Havre, and at the opening of Congress in December, he was once more in his Senatorial seat.
Ix. No portion of the earth approaches nearer to the ideal of the invalid's paradise, than the south of France. Bordering on the Mediterranean, That tideless sea, Which ceaseless rolls eternally; whose waters vary in temperature only one or two degrees in the year, and whose climate combines all the soft and genial influences so completely embraced in the term mezzo giorno, and far away from the fire-life Americans lead, he was now on the road to substantial recovery. After one more rapid dash through Italy, he reported himself in Paris to Dr. Brown-Sequard, who now pronounced him well. For a month he took the seabaths at Havre, and at the opening of Congress in December, he was once more in his Senatorial seat.
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
ulchres,—and she may well do it; for the places where her great ones repose are the greenest spots on her island. We Americans cheated ourselves most egregiously when we thought England—once the head of the slavetrade, and only a few years ago thn things. You know our Republic has never had any fair play from any ministry except the Tories or Conservatives. All Americans involuntarily say of British politicians of your stripe, Save us from our friends, and we will take care of our enemiesThis no longer shall exist. As sons of freedom, you are now called upon to defend our most inestimable blessing. As Americans, your country looks with confidence to her adopted children for a valorous support, as a faithful return for the advant found themselves insensibly participating in the general feeling of sympathy and respect. And so the five millions of Americans of African descent halted suddenly on their dreary and downward road, and with a right about face, they began their for
Xli. How has England looked on this contest? Strange enough has been the course she has taken. She will hardly be able hereafter to explain it to others: it is doubtful if she can do it now even to herself. England lives in America to-day, and is dying at home. England is clinging to her sepulchres,—and she may well do it; for the places where her great ones repose are the greenest spots on her island. We Americans cheated ourselves most egregiously when we thought England—once the head of the slavetrade, and only a few years ago the front of the abolitionism of the world—would turn her slavery-hating back on the only organized band of slavery propagandism on the earth! Poor fools we! Just as though the British aristocracy—the true name for the British Government—meant anything but interference and trouble for us when her Grace the Duchess of Sutherland chaperoned the gifted Harriet Beecher Stowe through the court of her Majesty, simply because Mrs. Stowe, by wr
if an out, you have brawled for Freedom and Free Governments; if an in, you have resorted to the very last trick to keep there. You have, if an out, always paraded your friendship for the United States, and virulently assailed any Tory or Conservative ministry. In again, you first veered, then hesitated, then tacked, and then attacked us, our Government, and all American things. You know our Republic has never had any fair play from any ministry except the Tories or Conservatives. All Americans involuntarily say of British politicians of your stripe, Save us from our friends, and we will take care of our enemies. But you have reserved the meanest and most bare-faced tergiversation of your public life till you were pressing the verge of your mortal existence. After pointing a thousand times with exultation to our great and prosperous nation, and deploring the two wars waged against us, you are now gloating over the prospect (as you deem it) of our speedy disruption and downfall.
ndrew Jackson covers the whole ground, and breathes the magnanimous spirit of that hero-patriot:— Headquarters, 7th Military District. Mobile, September 21, 1814. To the free colored inhabitants of Louisiana. Through a mistaken policy, you have heretofore been deprived of a participation in the glorious struggle for national rights in which our country is engaged. This no longer shall exist. As sons of freedom, you are now called upon to defend our most inestimable blessing. As Americans, your country looks with confidence to her adopted children for a valorous support, as a faithful return for the advantages enjoyed under her mild and equitable government. As fathers, husbands, and brothers, you are summoned to rally around the standard of the eagle, to defend all which is dear in existence. Your country, although calling for your exertions, does not wish you to engage in her cause without amply remunerating you for the services rendered. Your intelligent minds are n
ce perceptibly diminished among them. Habits of industry, sobriety, frugality, and thrift; frequency in attending schools; tidying up of apartments, and their surroundings; better dressing of men, women, and children; a quicker sympathy with all the interests of society; grateful recognition of new kindnesses shown to them, instead of a spirit of assumption, or gratified vanity:— These were some of the fresh aspects which began to be seen wherever the Colored people were found; and it gave good ground for encouragement to assist them. A new responsibility was rolled upon the whole rank and file of the body of White society. Even those who had been the least hopeful, not to say the most provokingly prophetic of evil omen, found themselves insensibly participating in the general feeling of sympathy and respect. And so the five millions of Americans of African descent halted suddenly on their dreary and downward road, and with a right about face, they began their forward march.
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Ninth: Emancipation of the African race. (search)
tter of Counsel to colored men, which met the warm approval of Mr. Lincoln and Senator Sumner. It may not be wholly inappropriate now. Kind words to Africano-Americans. Washington, Jan. 1st, 1863. fellow-men:—The day you have waited for so long has at last come. You are all free now,--or you soon will be. Your charter hahing-floor of God. Let us calculate the debt which America owes to Africa. We can reach something like an approximation to the number of Africans or Africano-Americans who have lived and died on our soil. We do not propose to enumerate any considerable portion of the wrongs we have inflicted on that people,—how many we stole flabor under the lash, the maiming and torture of nerve and muscle, with the endless category of physical suffering, still each one of the mighty host of Africano-Americans—an army of thirteen millions, bond and free, living and dead—appears in solemn judgment against his individual oppressor and against the whole nation. The one
raced from beginning to end by robbery and plunder. But the historic pen which traces the first steps of millions of Freedmen to civilization, will have to record the fact that this Bureau was, what Mr. Sumner had first declared it to be, the Bridge to Freedom. After the Proclamation of Emancipation I addressed the following Letter of Counsel to colored men, which met the warm approval of Mr. Lincoln and Senator Sumner. It may not be wholly inappropriate now. Kind words to Africano-Americans. Washington, Jan. 1st, 1863. fellow-men:—The day you have waited for so long has at last come. You are all free now,--or you soon will be. Your charter has been duly signed by the President of the United States, and that deed is ratified in heaven. God is always on the right side: he is the everlasting friend of freedom. Being free, your earthly salvation is put into your own hands. While you had a master, he gave you bread, clothing, and shelter—such as they were. In escapi
1 2