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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 41 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 33 1 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 31 1 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 22 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 20 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 1 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 14 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Bee or search for Bee in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
he resolution inviting Mr. Everett to deliver before the Legislature his oration on Washington; but later, after what he had said at Taunton, Mass., the resolution was taken up again and passed. On May 30, in that city, in a preface to his oration he treated the assault as a grave public calamity. The passage is given in Sumner's Works, vol. IV. p. 323. Two years later further explanations appeared in his published letter (National Intelligencer. May 14, 1858; Boston Advertiser, Atlas and Bee, May 18), in which he said that he declined to attend because he had retired to private life and deprecated additional excitement; but that later, at Taunton, he made remarks to impart a more chastened and sober temper to the fiery indignation which pervaded the community. See also New York Evening Post, May 5, 1858, commenting on Mr. Yeadon's defence of him. Mr. Everett also in the same letter explained his signature, at the time of the assault, to a paper approving Sumner's course, which h
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
g as there was any reasonable prospect of his restoration, and any suggestion that he should give place to another was promptly rebuked by leading journals Worcester Spy, Dec. 29, 1858; Boston Advertiser, Sept. 16 and 18, 1858; Boston Atlas and Bee, Sept. 13, 1858; Springfield Republican, Dec. 21, 1858; New York Tribune, Jan. 24, 1857, June 11, 1858: J. G. Whittier in Boston Advertiser, Sept. 18, 1858. An attempt of the Democratic journal, the Boston Post, to torture the meaning of a resolution of the Republican convention so as to make it reflect Upon his absence from his post, was met by replies in the Atlas and Bee, Sept. 10 and 22, 1858; New York Tribune, September 15 and October 2. and public men. If Massachusetts was fortunate to have such a senator, he too was fortunate in the State which called him to the public service and kept him there. Various testimonies were given during his absence showing how he held the heart of the people,—among them a resolution of the Republ
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
etters to newspapers. Boston Traveller, June 9, by E. L. Pierce; Boston Journal, June 6, by B. P. Poore; Boston Atlas and Bee, June 11, by James Parker; New York Independent, June 14, by D. W. Bartlett; New York Tribune, June 5; New York Evening Po the Saturday before the election he spoke briefly at Salem for the re-election of John B. Alley to Congress; Atlas and Bee, November 6. and on the evening before the election he took the chair at Faneuil Hall, where in a brief speech he recognizl change in our history, making not only a new President, but a new government, Works, vol. v. pp. 338-347; Atlas and Bee, November 6. and commended for support the two candidates for Congress from Boston,—Burlingame and Alexander H. Rice, the alley, and Hillard. Some of these leaders are described in the New York Tribune; September 17, and the Boston Atlas and Bee, September 28. Felton, at this time President of Harvard College, and George Ticknor voted for Bell and Everett. The Whig